M14 Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi, two have two questions one of which has kind of been addressed in other posts, but not fully as far as I can tell. I just picked up an M1A scout squad, and I'm planning on dropping it into an Sage stock as soon as I get a Sadlak op rod spring guide that's in the mail.

So, question one- What is the purpose of the small holes parallel to the op rod and barrel holes in the block? At first I thought they were for a tapered drift punch, like to avoid slipping since there is nothing to align them with in the stock(am I missing something here?) but the amount of force I've read that most people require when taking them on and off, coupled with their irregular and asymmetric placement, and the block itself's asymmetry makes makes this seem unlikely.

Question two- How sensitive is the alignment of the Guide around the barrel and how difficult is it to do correctly.? I've read several posts highlighting misaligned op rods after replacing op rod guides, but they seem pretty rare. The responses in them also seem to suggest that the bigger issue than piston alignment(which I would think would be fairly obvious and easy to correct for, and apparently only needs to be pretty good not perfect) is tension on the charging handle portion of the rod and barrel rub. These don't seem like they would be very apparent until the rifle was fully assembled again. I'd like to do the install myself(for experience/cool points as well as cost) but if there is a very high chance of me needing to have someone else do it anyway I figure I should just save my self some time and effort, and get the ball rolling on that right away.

Thoughts, answers, replies appreciated, and thanks for reading!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
628 Posts
1) I expect the holes are for weight savings, stress relief, or thermal expansion. I'm shooting in the dark on this one, but I would expect it to be related to one of those three things.

2) I've always had a gunsmith install the op-rod guide block as both of mine required lapping due to the barrel finish increasing dimension. Can't really comment beyond that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Man I had a bit of a time putting my oprod guide block on. What I ended up doing was getting it pretty close to how it SHOULD have been and then put the op rod in. I used it as a guide pretty much with no spring. Be advised you MAY want to run some VERY VERY fine grit sandpaper down the op rod itself. The reason why is the fit between the op rod and the block itself is VERY tight. If you test fit the block before you will notice how tight it is. I just did a couple passes on the op rod with the sand paper and then greased the op rod itself with a very light coat of grease.

From there I put the op rod on the barrel and got it as close as I could, and then put the op rod in as stated above, but without the spring so it would slide freely. From there I would give light taps to the right or left side of the op rod block until the op rod was sliding back and forth freely (USE A BRASS HAMMER NOTHING HARDER!!!) I actually used a combo of a 2x4 and my brass hammer, but stopped using the wood block when tiny splinters of it got into the space between the barrel and oprod guide. After that just continue with the rest of the stock assembly.

As for the holes you are talking about on the SIDE of the op rod guide block, are you sure those arent the screw holes that are used to secure the op rod guide block to the chassis itself?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
No I'm talking about the holes running parallel to the guide holes not the mounts. There are four of them. One between the 7 and 8 o'clock of the barrel hole, one each between the 7&8, the 4&5, and at the 9 o'clock of the op rod guide hole.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
628 Posts
From there I would give light taps to the right or left side of the op rod block until the op rod was sliding back and forth freely (USE A BRASS HAMMER NOTHING HARDER!!!) I actually used a combo of a 2x4 and my brass hammer, but stopped using the wood block when tiny splinters of it got into the space between the barrel and oprod guide.
A better way is slipping a piece of PVC pipe over the barrel so it evenly contacts the op-rod guide while you tap it into place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the responses. I already had both those installation instructions and the most current one from Sage, and they make no mention of alignment around the barrel only placement along it. Since there is no warning in the instructions and I can't find too many threads about it on the forums I'm going to assume that the tolerance is high enough that I'm not worried about it. Further advice, opinions or insights are always welcome.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top