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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What do you guys think about the Sadlak scope mounts. I want to scope my Springfield M1A and i like their aluminum mount but i would like you opinions on these mounts. thanks for your help.
 

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I have one mounted on my M1A N/M and I like it alot.Here are a couple of pixs of the mount,my reciever is USGI,it fit nice and tight with out any problems.
 

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Sadlak

I have tried several of the mounts mentioned above and have chosen the Sadlak. The Sadlak is very well made and solid as a rock. The customer service at Sadlak is outstanding as well.

Rich
 

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Definitely one of the best. They are well engineered, with good customer support. Be prepared to use up some scope windage to zero - also, there is the possibility of "stovepipe" jams that may require ejector/spring adjustment or replacement .

I personally would recommend the steel "Airborne" model.

AMCYCO78
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I read on their website about mounting problems with some receiver types. Will it fit properly on a Springfield receiver or will it need to be modified. My rifle was built in 2010 if that is any help.
 

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Definitely one of the best. They are well engineered, with good customer support. Be prepared to use up some scope windage to zero -

I personally would recommend the steel "Airborne" model.

AMCYCO78
I had this problem when I first mounted my Sadlak. Used five full mils of windage. Contacted Mike at Sadlak via email and the same day I got a detailed reply back on some minor adjustments to make when mounting. Sure enough I now need less than half a mil to be right on zero.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So can someone tell me if the Springfield receiver is built to Gi spec or will i need to get the Sadlak mount modified to fit properly.
 

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So can someone tell me if the Springfield receiver is built to Gi spec or will i need to get the Sadlak mount modified to fit properly.
My M1A is a 2009 and it fit perfectly. And as already mentioned their customer service is first rate (and that's coming from personal experience). I did a ton of research before buying a mount and I'm glad I went with a Sadlak DI5
 

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Greetings,

I have three M14s; 2 have Sadlak mounts and the other is an LRB M25 or it would have one as well. IMO, can't go wrong there.

Regards, Jim
 

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I use the Sadlak Airborne steel mount and have put it on three M1As; a standard model, a loaded model, and a SOCOM. They covered the years since 1980 and the mount fit them all perfectly, without any special modifications. The trick is to tighten the screws in a Round-Robbin fashion and wiggle the mount as you go. I also use small levels to verify proper alignment with the centerline of the bore as I tighten the mount.

I'm not a gunsmith but since I have installed this particular model mount several times I have noticed that I get the best results by using the following process.

  1. Clean the screw hole that is in the side of the receiver. I chase the threads with a tap and then make sure that the threads are clean and dry.
  2. Make sure that the dove tail where the stripper clip guide used to be is clean and dry and has no burrs.
  3. Install the wedge that goes in to the dove tail, without tightening it.
  4. Install the mount and loosely tighten the side screw.
  5. Make sure that the front screw does not touch the receiver ring.
  6. Tighten the side screw, with the tensioner at 12 O'clock, and the single large allen screw in the wedge slowly by hand until they are all snubbed up but not torqued. At this point you have gotten the mount pretty well aligned with the slots on the side of the receiver and the wedge isn't torquing the mount to either side.
  7. Tighten the small wedge screws that fix the wedge to the receiver.
  8. Torque everything to spec. That tensioner under the side screw will push the mount left or right so it can be used to help align the centerline of the mount.
  9. The last thing to do is tighten the screw up front. Adjust it so that it just barely touches the receiver ring. This screw can help align the mount fore and aft but remember, this screw isn't meant to be a used like a jack screw, it's used as sort of a tension device. You don't want to bend the mount with it so if you use it to adjust that angle of the mount then it would be best to loosen the other screws just a bit and then re-torque everything to ensure that nothing is being twisted or bent by the screw pressure.
I also do all of this while checking the alignment of the mount using two small bubble levels; one level I put on the receiver and the other on the mount. I compare the two and make sure that their bubbles match. Check for level fore to aft and side to side.

My method is a little slow but, knock on wood, I usually only have to fire about two or three rounds at 25 yards, a couple at 50 yards and then one or two at 100 yards and I'm dead on. And I don't have to use all of my adjustment range to get on target, just a few clicks one way or another.
 
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