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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Set out my 8" diameter AR500 steel round target that is 1/2" thick steel at 100 yards away from my bench. The steel definitely takes the hits without a problem. No dimpling of the steel from the SA ammo. The support stick I have is regular mild steel box with a angle iron welded on the front to deflect bullets. I use this for my 1911 shooting but decided to shoot my EBR.

So my quiz question for you is what do you think happen to the angle iron hits at 100 yds away? Pics below so guess first.....



Pic of two rounds straight on.


Bullet entering right to left. It is the left hole from pic above.


Right side hole, bullet entering from left to right stripping off metal jacket.


I thought the angle iron would of deflected the round at 100 yards away, but the bullet hit the 45 degree iron and drilled straight thru as if it was flat. Surprised me what it can do even after losing energy at 100 yds away.
 

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very cool indeed
 

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I have a heavy 6" round regular carbon steel target that I made from a thick piece of plate. 7.62 fmjs and the 308 soft pt hunting ammo out of my 18.5" barrel puts big 1/8" deep crators in it that the end of my thumb fits in at 150 yds. the 45-70 400 gr. hard cast just splatters on the face but it knocks the mess out of it (impressively violent reaction) they broke the chain that I had welded to it to make it hang off the rebar stand. I also found out that if you hit the same spot twice on the rebar stand with the M14 it just cuts the rebar in two. That is why it is just outside my door waiting for me to haul it back to the welding shop!
 

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In my view, this is part of the rationale for 7.62 vs. smaller caliber, lighter bullets. A lot of "cover" becomes merely "concealment."
 

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Ive seen '06 hunting rounds cut through 1" mild steel plates like butter. I have a bunch of 3/8" high hard plates set up where I shoot and they dont even dimple or dent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That is the great thing about this AR500 steel. I don't even have any dimples in the 1/2" thick plate. I found a local guy that makes these targets. He builds them to take 300 Win Mag hits. http://www.lvsteeltargets.com/



I find all sorts of flatten bullets and shrapnel on the ground after they hit the steel. My 8" round target weighs 10lbs by itself. I just have to do my part and hit the target instead of the support stick. Once I dialed in the iron sights it was no problem hearing the thud of the bullet at 100 yds.

I thought the rounds would have been deflected hitting the angle iron but it did not seem to matter too much, the bullet stayed the course and drilled right thru. I was impressed.
 

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That AR500 plate will eventually crack, but holds up very well to all sorts of ammo. I've shot old WWII AP rounds at it and it has trouble going through 1/2 inch stuff. Some go through, some don't. Will post pics later.
 

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In case anybody cares about that old workhorse 30-06:

J Hatcher shows a 150 gr bullet penetrating 32 inches (ALMOST 3 FEET, if you went to public schools) of Oak boards, after the bullet had stabilized (maybe 75 yards). MV = 2700 fps. Damn impressive!

Page 406 in 1966 printing.
 

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Safety issue

While it is fun to blow holes in steel, hardened steel AR400-500 should not be shot with a rifle at less than 200 yards and mild steel less than 100 yards. If the steel is allowed to move (hung with a chain) it lessens the chance of shrapnel coming back but not a habit to get into. If the plate is fixed (no movement) it just a matter of time before something bad happens. I say this from years of experience of shooting steel targets in the Army and then testing and making steel targets for Range Control after retirement. Just don't want to see some young guy ending their shooting career early because of lack of information.
Like they say "It's all fun and games until someone shoots an eye out"
 

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the manufacturers i purchase my AR500 from have told me that 100 yards was min safe distance - they are 4" popper targets.

i thought shooting soft steel at any distance was unsafe as after multiple "crater" hits its very possible a round can hit the edge of a "crater" and do a "u-turn"

thoughts?
 

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It's a lot better to hang your steel targets with nylon tow strap, conveyor belt, or old fire hose. They take a LOT more hits than chain does.
 

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If you've seen a bullet hit armor steel on the slowmotion video, you can see that a ricochet is very unlikely. The bullet explodes on impact. I've shot my plate at 50 yards and have had absolutely no ricochets. The manufacturers recommend the 100 yard minimum distance for liability reasons. For example, The major manufacturer of auto lifts tests them with three times the weight. So a 9,000 lb lift can really lift 27,000 lbs. But for liability reasons, the lift is rated at 9,000 lbs.

Her is a video link of bullets impacting all sorts of steel. Specifically at 1:45 a bullet hits armor steel

[ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QfDoQwIAaXg[/ame]








the cylinder welded to the plate is chrome moly steel.
 

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I eyewitnessed a guy get a u-turn ricochet off a steel plate, with .45 ACP FMJ, range was 25 yards IIRC. Luckily it was just a piece of bullet jacket, but it hit him EXACTLY between the running lights and drew blood. GI8
 

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I've seen the .45ACP ricochet from time to time. It happens and is usually just a cut or a bruise. I shoot at steel regularly at the defensive pistol matches and have yet to catch a ricochet. Safety glasses are a must.
 

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i popped two cherries in one day this weekend:

my brand spanking new sa m1a

and a brand new ar500 plate on two hooks hanging target

i was out about 75 yards....was more testing for function than
anything else, since it was new out of the box

i found that i needed to zero my sights, which i will do next time
out, but did hit that plate a few times, without any problem

i was leery of shooting at iron, as it was my first time, but it
went well...i like that ping when you get a hit...i am way more
leery of shooting at a bowling pin, which i have only done a few times and have since chickened out, as those things can
really bounce stuff off of them if you dont hit them dead on

the m1a worked great and i am going to go out and zero
my sights hopefully this weekend

i now know why all you guys are such fans....consider
me converted!
 

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YES. I agree. Shooting steel under 100 with rifles makes me nervious. For short work we frequently practiced on steel E types @ 25, 50, 75 and 100, and there is nothing worse than hearing that round whizzing past your head back at you. You can seem those buggers sometimes. No bueno.

Also, on my own time one day, a few years back, I thought it would be a *GREAT* idea to shoot this old rusty 57' chevy wheel that was out back with FMJ .45 ACP... im very lucky I didnt rip my face off. Never again.

-DS K.CIB3



While it is fun to blow holes in steel, hardened steel AR400-500 should not be shot with a rifle at less than 200 yards and mild steel less than 100 yards. If the steel is allowed to move (hung with a chain) it lessens the chance of shrapnel coming back but not a habit to get into. If the plate is fixed (no movement) it just a matter of time before something bad happens. I say this from years of experience of shooting steel targets in the Army and then testing and making steel targets for Range Control after retirement. Just don't want to see some young guy ending their shooting career early because of lack of information.
Like they say "It's all fun and games until someone shoots an eye out"
 
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