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You'll hit the ground running and not have the time to look back. I retired in 96 and never regretted it other than the folks I left behind. Business community will love that you served and should help you get your foot in the door and the monthly check sure helps (if they still do that). Make some money and get ready for the next adventure called old age retirement. CWO
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Yeah, right. Businesses won't really try to beat your door down for having served. That's old school propaganda that doesn't really happen in today's world.

I assume you are an officer and that's the only advantage that you will have. A combination of education and administrative management is similar to the experiences of business management personnel, so they will feel that they understand your skill set and be more prone to hire you for those reasons, not because you were in the military. Other than that, your military experience is considered more of a problem for the average business person, especially if you had ground combat experience. HR feels that prior service personnel that have had ground combat time are just time bombs waiting to slaughter every employee in the building.

Build a resume that stresses your education, service schools that relate to personnel management and HR skills are good. Also stress the jobs that you've had that put you in direct management positions, people management is a strong benefit. Don't forget to point out your interpersonal communication with higher authorities, civilians like to know that you understand office politics and are OK with it.
 

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馃ぃ馃お
Yeah, right. Businesses won't really try to beat your door down for having served. That's old school propaganda that doesn't really happen in today's world.

I assume you are an officer and that's the only advantage that you will have. A combination of education and administrative management is similar to the experiences of business management personnel, so they will feel that they understand your skill set and be more prone to hire you for those reasons, not because you were in the military. Other than that, your military experience is considered more of a problem for the average business person, especially if you had ground combat experience. HR feels that prior service personnel that have had ground combat time are just time bombs waiting to slaughter every employee in the building.

Build a resume that stresses your education, service schools that relate to personnel management and HR skills are good. Also stress the jobs that you've had that put you in direct management positions, people management is a strong benefit. Don't forget to point out your interpersonal communication with higher authorities, civilians like to know that you understand office politics and are OK with it.
I reccomend anyone doing skill bridge. Best job offers I have seen lately have come out of skill bridge. In a few years when I retire, I 100% plan to do it.
 

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馃ぃ馃お
Yeah, right. Businesses won't really try to beat your door down for having served. That's old school propaganda that doesn't really happen in today's world.

I assume you are an officer and that's the only advantage that you will have. A combination of education and administrative management is similar to the experiences of business management personnel, so they will feel that they understand your skill set and be more prone to hire you for those reasons, not because you were in the military. Other than that, your military experience is considered more of a problem for the average business person, especially if you had ground combat experience. HR feels that prior service personnel that have had ground combat time are just time bombs waiting to slaughter every employee in the building.

Build a resume that stresses your education, service schools that relate to personnel management and HR skills are good. Also stress the jobs that you've had that put you in direct management positions, people management is a strong benefit. Don't forget to point out your interpersonal communication with higher authorities, civilians like to know that you understand office politics and are OK with it.
Such a negative nanny. CWO
 

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Congrats on finally hanging up the blues. Retired from the Air Force back in 1986. I'm one of those odd ducks that had split service, 4 years, 3 mos, 5 days in the Navy (not that I was keeping track) and 16 years in the Air Force, with 4 years separation between branches. Retirement highlights to look forward to are being retired longer than your active service. For me, it's been 36 years.

Going forth on the medical scene, the wife and I've REALLY benefited being in the Tricare system (currently Tricare for Life) and it's vastly superior to what the VA has been offering for fellow retirees further south of me. I live in an area that is outside the VA mandatory enrollment.
 

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LRB M14 SA, Criterion Med Wt CL Barrel, all GI parts with basic upgrades.
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I just wanted to share the news and ask for some well wishes and prayers.

I鈥檒l be retiring soon, 20 years and some days as Active Duty Air Force. My last day on duty and in uniform will be 28 December, except for my final out appointment later on.

It鈥檚 been a heck of a ride, I鈥檒l say that much. Three different uniform versions, three different Performance Report/Promotion Systems, and several manning cuts and retention programs, I鈥檝e survived lol. I take my hat off to anyone that enlists, was enlisted, has enlisted or let alone made any type of career out of it. You can experience the single worst and best day within the same 24-hour period鈥 however, I have what I have and am who I am today because of the Air Force. And more than anything else, I will miss my team of Airmen, NCOs, and SNCOs.

The military is a second spouse; sometimes one that takes precedence and more time then anything else. But through it all I鈥檝e been blessed throughout my career; most of all with my family. Now it鈥檚 time to close this chapter and move onto focusing on them.
Lucky guy! I still got 5 years left in Uncle Sams Army
 

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Thanks for your service, and good luck on your next endeavor. My last day was May 31, 1997 after 24 yrs in the Seabees.
 

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Congratulations on your upcoming retirement! It would be beneficial for you to learn how to "tailor" your resume for a specific job you are applying for. Many employers know a lot more about the military, number of years served. You've done your 20 and employers know that means you retired. If you said 7 years and 3 months or 16 years they will inquisitive about why you got out with an odd number of years of service. The NCOA has a Career link on their website; if not a member I would suggest joining them.

I retired as a CWO4 (sadly a career path that the Air Force doesn't have) so I joined MOA (Military Officer's Association). Through MOA I used their job center to find my first job after retirement. I sent a e-mail to a MOA Network Member, who read my resume, and told the company CEO about how I would be a perfect fit for a Logistic's Analysist; flew to Ohio for the interview, and started working for them while on terminal leave. Although half the company was laid off after I'd been there 13 months (me included) they gave me a nice letter of introduction. I applied for a Customs Inspector position and on 4 February I started out as a GS-7 and retired as a GS-11 (heart attack) in 2014.

Don't sell a government job or your self short; my military service helped me get that first job!

Service and employment summary:

US NAVY from July 1970 - July 1974
US COAST GUARD from June 1975 - June 2001
Civilian Logistics Analysist May 1974 - May 1975
CBP Officer February 2004 - August 2014
Retired!

In addition to the Coast Guard Retirement check I also am drawing social security, CBP Retirement, and am a 100% Disabled Vet.
 

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Congratulations on surviving the long journey to your retirement! My father retired from the Air Force in 1967, with 22 years (two years in Army in WWII; 2nd wave ashore at Normandy). My own retirement from the Marines came in 1991 with 20 years. I'd had enough by then, I'll admit. I think each and every one of us has a good deal of trepidation with our upcoming return to "normal" society. I was warned that one of the most difficult things to acclimate to was all those people running around with no one in charge! There was truth in that, I found. You'll do more than survive, you'll land on your feet and be off and running before you know it. Relax and enjoy the transition, you'll be fine. I'm sure all of us wish you the very best in your future. Retired military is a "brotherhood" (and "sisterhood") that will be glad to see you join. Welcome aboard!
 

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Congratulations! Thank you for serving.

I retired in 1985 with twenty-two years. I joined the Navy Reserves when I turned seventeen and spent my senior year of high school in the reserves. I graduated high school on a Friday and went on active duty the following Monday.

I spent twelve years on active duty in the Navy including tours in Viet Nam. I got out as a Chief Petty Officer (E-7). I joined the Army National Guard and retired as a Warrant Officer.

I took an early retirement and severance package as a staff engineer from a corporation merging with another corporation.

I took a severance package and retired as the manager of Credit & Collections, a service center, and a call center from a corporation during a downsizing.

I got my real estate license in Southwest Florida and sold homes during the boom years. When I decided to retire, I voted for a live-aboard sailboat. My wife voted to move home the Oregon. We compromised and moved to Oregon.

I got bored and sold luxury brand European vehicles and retired.

A law enforcement agency hired me as a consultant. I retired after five years.

I have retired six times so far.
 

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Congratulations... Believe it or not, you are going to miss it. The biggest difference I found between the military and civilian work sector is how most military folks know their job, are highly trained, and accept the responsibilities that go with their occupations. They also know exactly what their authority is. Most civilians wing it. It's a distinction you will come to appreciate. MSG, USAF/RET.
 
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