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Retired in 83 on 20 years service with a 85% bilateral high frequency hearing loss. Having a hard time hearing conversation. Let alone which way the deer run. Am approaching 70 year. Ex-pat US living in Norther interior of B.C. Canada . Any chance for a couple of hearing aids from the VA? I also have a thyroid that went up while I was on active duty.
Probably from my exposure to radiation while stationed on the USS AFDB7 in Holy Loch Scotland from 1964 to l966. We dry docked FBM subs and worked outside the the reactors and got continually sprayed with reactor cooling water while sandblasting and painting the nuke boats. Got a disability for that one.
 

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Hello eaglesnester. I was on the Hunley as a diver (in diving locker) 1964-1966 and the Simon Lake 1966-1968 in the Holy Loch. In my opinion your thyroid problem is not from the FBM's as the radiation discharge known as CD29 always had a temporary drydock flange installed by our divers before the AFDB-7 would raise the sub out of the water. We also hooked up fire hoses to those temporary flanges prior to sub coming out of water.On the Hunley my Radiation Accumulated dose was slightly less than 6 Rem. The Navy lost my Simon Lake Dose but I estimate it to be at least 6 Rem as I did the same functions. As a diver we also done all the rigging inside the subs. Anytime we were diving or rigging we were required to wear a "film badge" that measured our radiation dose. Anyway after the Navy I went to work and retired from Nuclear commercial power plants. My lifetime accumulated radiation dose is around 15Rem. What I'm saying is I seriously doubt your having thyroid problems is due to the FBM's....I'm not saying its impossible. Also under normal conditions you should have never been sprayed with radioactive water. If you were you should have known it because you would have been scrubbed down thoroughly to remove it by "Decon-Techs from Chem-Rad. Maybe you knew my Diving corpsman "Cerny", he was also there 64 thru 68. Take care.
 

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I think I've seen this post before, but let's take a crack at it...

You are not covered under current law for conditions secondary to radiation exposure in your particular situation. Exposure is not ratable, and the law is for veterans from the Pacific test site series, Hiroshima/Nagasaki POWs and cleanup, not occupational exposure from power plants.

To determine whether hearing loss would be ratable by the VA you would need to file a claim. Then the question arises is the hearing loss due to your time in the military or just because you are getting older. You can file but you would be best off to order a copy of your service treatment records (unless you already have a copy) from the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis. Go to archives dot gov to get that started. You can do it snail mail or electronically. Just follow the directions.

Your service medical records would have to show a 40 db shift in the 1k to 4k ranges or <94% in speech recognition. They subtract your entry physical numbers from your retirement physical numbers to get the result. If you meet those standards, get an opinion (medical nexus) from your ear doctor that in their opinion, based on a review of your records (old & new) that "more likely than not" your hearing loss was due to the military (then they give a sound medical opinion as to why).

You can also enroll with the VA in the states (VA Form 10-10EZ) and see if the VA Medical Center near you has funding for hearing aids for non-service connected vets. Some may have a budget, some may not. Usually you have to be rated to get them issued.

If you file and get rated, they will take care of you.

Note...right now the VA & National Archives are going to digital records. All claims or paperwork submitted is automatically sent off for scanning which is creating another 30-60 days of delays for now. They'll catch up but it will take a while. As the National Archives and the VA digitize claim files, they will be shredded. If you have an eBenefits account and need to submit address changes, dependency forms, even claims you can submit directly to eBenefits - files can be no greater than 5 meg when uploaded. I do recommend that you always use a service organization when filing to ensure your file is complete.

HTH

Bruce
 
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