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Hey everyone,

I have a polytech m14s that I am in the process of scoping. I need to take off the stripper clip guide, but it does not want to come off. I am using a 3/32 punch and hammering from underneath the receiver but the roll pin won't come out. What am I doing wrong? Advice would be much appreciated.
 

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Try a little penetrating oil such as kroil and let it set overnight. Make sure you have a nice flat tipped punch so you don't mushroom the pin into the receiver. When all else fails get out the drill and " gently" take the pin out in pieces.
 

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I have a M305. I have mine scoped and so had to remove the clip guide too. Some of these parts are friction fit, so try using a little heat, I recommend a soldering iron touching the clip guide for about ten minutes, if you don't have a soldering iron try using a naked flame on the clip guide and then "drifting" out the guide from either side of the receiver with a punch and mallet.
I also recommend tapping the pin from the top - using a roll pin punch, they are slightly better than a plain pin punch as they center themselves on the roll pin.
Hope I helped!
 

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3/32 same as the pin. And no CLP or WD-40 will not work as well as Kroil Oil. A close mix to Kroil Oil is Automatic Transmission Fluid and Acetone IIRC. Do not remember the mixture ratio, but can be Googled. You want something to get in there and reduce your coefficient of static friction so you can get the pin moving. Sometimes pins can be forced in when the holes are not perfectly aligned, shaving a bit from one side. Makes them more difficult to get out. Make sure the receiver is vised down and secured so the force of your strikes is translated into the pin rather than movement of the entire receiver. And use quality roll pin punches from Snap On. The others, Grace and such, are junk. Soak it in Kroil or a replacement overnight, even a very light oil, like that used to sharpen knives and such can be used. Good luck and secure that bad boy. It makes all the difference.

One more thing. Have you tried the other direction??? Driving it out from the top???? Couldn't hurt to try.
 

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Is your punch getting stuck inside the roll pin???? If not then you're good with 3/32.
 

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You could try and see if it moves. Troubleshooting requires experimenting. Experience is the one thing that cannot be hastened generally. Not for us hobbyists anyhow. I often struggled with roll pins myself. Never used them for anything before. Folks here helped me out. How to close them some and dress the end prior to installation. Use of roll pin holders to get them started is a plus, but not required.

Don't get frustrated and tape off areas with painters tape, not duct tape or anything with a strong adhesive or it will take the finish with it, don't ask me how I know, so you do not mar the surfaces. If you do get frustrated then stop and ask further questions. It is conceivable that adhesives could have been employed, but doubtful. Acetone would help to weaken them. That's where the Kroil Oil comes into play if indeed it contains Acetone. Wife may have some acetone solutions to remove nail polish.

But vise the receiver down so it does not move. I cannot stress this enough and use a heavy hammer. This is where heat treated roll pin punches, like those from Snap On come into play. Cheap ones will just bend quickly under those forces if any lateral force is in play which is largely unavoidable when striking at any other angle than dead on.
 

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I have removed dozens and dozens of these roll pins without any problems. However, ALL of the METRIC sized roll pins that come with the Chinese M14 can vary considerably in quality. I have found some of these pins to be too hard, too brittle, and broken. If broken at an angle, the two pieces effectively act as an internal locking mechanism as they wedge against each other inside the hole when pushed together.

Sort of like the infernal "Chinese finger puzzle" we remember from our childhood.

NOTE: I have also found broken/too brittle roll pins in Chinese M14 rifles at the op rod guide, the bolt catch, and the magazine release. Replacing these pins with better quality pins is one of the little details I do for a better Chinese M14 build or tweak.

I also usually replace the Chinese trigger pin as these may be TOO SOFT, and if bent or worn can cause the trigger pull to feel erratic as the pin rotates.


While the Chinese M14 rifles are usually a great VALUE, and most ( as in over 50%) may be completely functional and durable and reliable right out of the box, they do have their idiosynchracys and foibles that may require sone attention. Usually these issues are minor and inexpensive and easy to fix.

BUT
be aware the bolt hold open shaft holes on a Chinese receiver are METRIC, AND SLIGHTLY SMALLER THAN THE GI HOLES. ATTEMPTING TO FORCE A TOO LARGE ROLL PIN INTO THESE HOLES CAN BREAK OFF A WING FROM THE RECEIVER.

And then you are REALLY REALLY SCREWED!!
 

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Drove mine through from top to bottom. I had a heck of a time getting that pin out. The guide itself is a chore as well. Make sure to oil it up too.
 
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