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1st time reloading for the M1A I have a large quantity of LC brass with primer pocket reamed. Do I just follow medium pressure load date for the 308? Any other special concerns ie taper crimp etc?

ThanksNAV1
 

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I personally use the Hornady Service rifle info. I do use lee dies and finish with a factory crimp some do some do not. I have found better accuracy with the crimp. I have used H4895, AA2520, and Varget. good results with all. Go slow and have fun, and ask if in doubt.DI5
Bob K MC1
 

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If you can get service rifle loading data, get it. LC brass is one fo the best brass for the M-14/M1A rifles. This brass has thicker case walls and web. This causes more pressure than commercial brass. Just adjust your loads down at least one full grain from standard loading manuals.(some recommend 10%) It is always better to start at minimum loads and work your way up.
IMR 4895 and H 4895 are the base powders for our rifles. Some use faster or slower depending on use and barrel length. Some of us crimp, (I give my bullets a gentile kiss with a tapered crimp die.) some of us don't. It depends on your personal preference.
Take it slow, enjoy, and be safe.

Glenn
 

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I had bought the Redding match die set and it came w/ a taper crimp die. After reading many opinions on crimping, I came across a statement mentioning the fact that M1A ammo takes a lot of abuse getting slammed around between recoil and being stripped from the mag and pushed up the feed ramp. Kind of an " oh yea" moment. After all, there is a lot of effort generated to make sure seating depth, along with other settings are consistent. So I do crimp.
I raise the round all the way up in the press then screw the die down until I make contact. Then lower the round and screw the die in more and bring the round back up to feel it "stick" a little, a.k.a., a kiss. This setting will vary with different brass and trim length. Taper crimping also takes out irregularities in the neck

As far as load data, if you are tight on cash, Sierra or Hornady are fine for now, although I do not like the binder format of the Sierra. All the other manuals kind of run within the same numbers as far as charge is concerned, but other general info will be mentioned that may not be in another. Start with the minimum charge just so you have a feel for what is going on, then you will know how high to take it from there.

Just remember to pay attention, stay organized .
Happy New Year! dance2
 

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Free download on reloading for the M1A: http://www.zediker.com/downloads/m14.html

I had a bad experience applying taper crimp 30 years ago and haven't crimped a bottleneck shell since for any gun. I was just 'kissing' the brass with the crimp, but it was enough pressure to swell the base of the shoulder - not enough to see without a caliper but enough to keep the round from chambering. The problem is I had made 400 rounds before I discovered my boo-boo.BRSTBOMB Other guys I know have admitted running into the same problem.

Another thing about taper crimping - if your cases are not exactly the same length, you will get a different amount of crimp on each round. With commercial reloads like you used to find lots of places, I've run into the occasional round that wouldn't chamber for the same reason mentioned above.

It is true that you need more neck tension with a semi-auto than with a bolt gun or single shot, but the typical sizing dies take that all into account. They err on the side of the semi-auto - so much so that the finicky bolt guys use special dies to lower the neck tension for their guns. They don't need near what the typical dies give you. The neck tension created by most standard resizing dies with anything but the thinnest brass ever made will be plenty to prevent setback, even in the M1A. If you're using something like LC, you've got nothing to worry about.
 

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When I load for my Springer I size the brass approx .003"-.004" back from where the rifle is HS and I trim to 2.007" +/- .001" using a power trimmer as far as loading LC Milsurp cases I started off low and worked my way up and surprisingly found (2) loads that worked identically but were 2gns apart, you have to realize that the internal volumes are different due to wall thickness so unless you have a manual that lists Service Rifle load data go with 10% under.
I personally use a 168 SMK or Nosler CC 168 and have had no issues with a kiss taper crimp, I know most don't crimp a non-cannelured bullet but I feel it give me alittle better neck tension if I do it.
 

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Thinking about reloading for the M14. For those with a Dillon 550 how much if any crimp do you use? Just a slight kiss to get rid of the belling?

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The Hornady service rifle load data uses commercial cases and is based on gas port pressure. The Hornady A-max bullets may be a bit pointier or longer than Sierra Match Kings and may be more case filling when seated to the same length. With military cases often the starting loads for 308 Winchester are at or near max, especially when using IMR / Hodgdon load data. The mid range 308 loads may be too hot for military cases in the M-14.
 
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