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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I just received a TRW complete bolt that has very little wear to speak of. The roller which appears to be about new with no lube on it or under it is a plum red. Has anyone seen anything like this before?
 

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I received a TRW bolt with synthetic grease on the roller and it was a plum red. But you could tell it was grease, it was clumped under and around the roller. Have you tried wiping the roller down to see if the color comes off or changes?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The color doesn't come off. It was soaked in acetone for about an hour and the red color is there to stay.
 

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Could this be a "plum" coloring from the heat treat process, like the Mauser 98K extractors? Certain steel parts on certain guns show anything from a plum-red to a "straw" color. Perhaps one of our resident ex-military armorers can shed some light on this. CC
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Could this be a "plum" coloring from the heat treat process, like the Mauser 98K extractors? Certain steel parts on certain guns show anything from a plum-red to a "straw" color. Perhaps one of our resident ex-military armorers can shed some light on this. CC
Well that could be, IF rollers were Blued..which is what causes the plum color on certain parts like Mauser extractors. Those cases the heat treat is causing the red color because the part is left in the bluing tanks too long. The straw color is different as that is caused by drawing the heat treat hardness to prevent a brittle condition and is usually found on parts made of a spring steel. I am very familiar with both processes and why that occurs. This is totally different.
Rollers on M14 bolts are tool steel and are normally unfinished unless the entire bolt has been refinished with the roller on.

However, Jeff (Hueygunner) tells me that the red color is caused by a red dye that is put on the part when it is first fitted so that it can be clearance checked and that if left on long enough it will take some cycling and some grease loading to remove it rather than just trying to wash it off with acetone as has been there too long to just wash off. He says it's normal in the cases of new bolts.
 

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If it is the red dye called dycam try using nail polish remover it comes right off. My wife supply ways seems to run out when I lapp in a bolt. I will never tell so please keep it our secret.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It may be dye. That's what Hueygunner told me in a PM. However nail polish remover, doesn't even begin to touch it. The main ingredient that is in nail polish remover in very small guantities is acetone. I soaked it in pure acetone for over an hour and it didn't even begin to touch it. The rest of the ingredients in nail polish remover are to keep the acetone from drying out the nails and make it smell good but the acetone which is not as strong as pure acetone is the exact same thing only more concentrated and can be bought at the Hardware store by the gallon to use as a solvent. Hueygunner told me that it would wear off once I greased it and started to use it over time.
 

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If it functions don't let it bother you. Nobody will see it. If it bugs you to no end the roller can be changed. Slap some grease on it and get to shooting. I personally never saw a red one, I have seen the black because people don't remove them when they reparked the bolts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If it functions don't let it bother you. Nobody will see it. If it bugs you to no end the roller can be changed. Slap some grease on it and get to shooting. I personally never saw a red one, I have seen the black because people don't remove them when they reparked the bolts.
I bought it for a spare and was just wondering about the red roller. Before I follow your suggestion I think I'll check the headspace and function. If it still bugs me I'll have hueygunner change out the roller for me.
 

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Just call it Rudolf and be happy you've got a spare DI5
 

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Just a point. You do realize bolts are not just drop in for a couple of reasons one you mentioned headspace the second lug contact. Bolt lugs and receiver lugs need a certian amount of contact to remain safe.
 

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Well that could be, IF rollers were Blued..which is what causes the plum color on certain parts like Mauser extractors. Those cases the heat treat is causing the red color because the part is left in the bluing tanks too long. The straw color is different as that is caused by drawing the heat treat hardness to prevent a brittle condition and is usually found on parts made of a spring steel. I am very familiar with both processes and why that occurs. This is totally different.
Rollers on M14 bolts are tool steel and are normally unfinished unless the entire bolt has been refinished with the roller on.

However, Jeff (Hueygunner) tells me that the red color is caused by a red dye that is put on the part when it is first fitted so that it can be clearance checked and that if left on long enough it will take some cycling and some grease loading to remove it rather than just trying to wash it off with acetone as has been there too long to just wash off. He says it's normal in the cases of new bolts.
Steel with a high Nickel content will turn a plum color when hot blued. A good example of this is a Finnish M39 ''B'' Barrel or some of the early H&K P7 Slides.
 

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I have seen hundreds of complete bolts and many hundreds of new rollers over the years and the rollers were always either bright, or refinished gray/black.

Red, to me, indicates somebody did something to it. Not a GI process.
 
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