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Halfway through a JCG match this past weekend, my shots started stringing vertically down towards the six ring. I realized that the screw in the elevation knob was loose and the aperature had slipped down. I took a dime and tightened the screw. Ensuring the aperature was bottomed out, I then raised it 13 clicks and continued the slowfire string. All subsequent shots were in the black. Other than blue loctite, is there a remedy to preclude any futher problems?
 

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Halfway through a JCG match this past weekend, my shots started stringing vertically down towards the six ring. I realized that the screw in the elevation knob was loose and the aperature had slipped down. I took a dime and tightened the screw. Ensuring the aperature was bottomed out, I then raised it 13 clicks and continued the slowfire string. All subsequent shots were in the black. Other than blue loctite, is there a remedy to preclude any futher problems?
I'm glad you got through the rest of your match. If you could tighten that screw with a dime it still isn't very tight. Wrap a leather sling keeper around the elevation knob and grip it with your pliers, tighten the screw with a screwdriver that'll put some purchase to it. Could be your windage knob is a half-turn loose at the center nut. Test it and see if the knobs still turn on each side but hold tighter where you set them.
 

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To tighten the screw in the elev knob I just let the aperture run all the way up, and then snug the screw firmly.
(this works unless the aperture ramp has been ground to allow it to come all the way off....)

The 'nut' in the wind knob should be tightened enough so the the aperture ramp will not go down when pushed with firm thumb pressure, AND so that the elev and wind knobs can be moved without undue pressure.

Pressing 'in' on the screw in the elev knob makes it easier to adjust the wind knob 'nut'.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
 

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I have the same issue.

I am trying some of the suggestions here but have yet to make it through a match without the score killing drop..
 

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If you 'count down' your clicks after a stage, be SURE to immediately reset them for the next stage ...

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
 

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Would also like to add that when the triangular shaped projection on the elevation pinion wears down, it can cause all but the tightest pinions to slip.

If the spring in the elevation pinion is worn and the elevation screw is tight, the aperture may still slip unless you tighten the windage knob nut so much you can't use it. Sometimes you can put a tighter fitting rear sight cover (spring) on and get enough tension that way, that you can back off the nut tightness.

Since so many commercial M14 receivers are not up to G.I. specs, fitting even standard sights so they work properly can take a lot of fitting, time and parts swapping to get some RS assemblies right.

Finally, if you put your face real close to the aperture as I do, the aperture hitting your shooting glasses in recoil can cause it to be knocked down a click or two each time the aperture hits your shooting glasses. We found that out by the nicks in the shooting glasses of some of our shooters.
 

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For what its worth...Purple Loctite...it is made for really fine/small screws like scope bases/rings. I don't remember the product number, but Brownells sells it...and I bought some from Wally World once about ten yers ago and didn't have any issues removing scope base screws. If you decide to use it, it shouldn't strip off threads, screw slots, or screw heads when you have to remove or change parts. I had that RS slippage problem as well on my SA Garand I bought late last year. I had some free time to PMCS the RS; clean the parts; re-Lubriplate them and re-assemble. I, sadly, haven't had time to see if things hold together though. I don't have a TM for this rifle, but followed the procedure in the Jerry Kuhnhausen book.
 
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