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Range Report/Lessons Learned – RWVA First Anniversary Shoot
RWVA Website

The 3/5 RWVA First Anniversary shoot was a real winner, as each of us continued to improve our practical marksmanship skills. For me, it was the first time combining accurate rifle shooting and movement, while carrying a full load.

We began the day, per standard practice, with the AQT. Then, each participant brought not only their rifles to the firing line, but also whatever gear he or she would use to carry at least 300 rounds of ammo in the field. Some folks had small packs or waist packs, others had web gear, and still other used ditty bags or bandoleers slung a la Pancho Villa over their shoulders. Just figuring out how to carry and use my mags, ammo and canteens was a valuable learning experience (memo to file: I need to get a USGI butt pack).

We then slung our rifles (mags out, bolts locked open, safeties on), formed into a line, and quickly moved up the hill to the 500 yard berm and back. As we returned, one of the RWVA members fired a star shell, indicating that the pop-ups were exposed. Taking “cover” behind the 100 yard berm, we loaded our rifles, charged up the berm, and blasted the pop-ups at the 200 and 300 yard lines. Even from a supported, semi-prone position on the berm, it was really tough to overcome the huffing and puffing to get a decent sight picture, at least at first. More aerobic exercise, less bacon for this fat boy!

The day continued with the standard pop-up speed shoot and sniper events, each of which brought rewards and challenges. Those head/shoulder targets are mighty small at 500 yards, but lots of folks knocked them down! We also ran several laps of the super-fun “Counterattack” game, where the two-man teams clear the pop-ups from prone, then run downrange towards the 100 yard berm. Along the way, the pop-ups come back up several times, and the team has to drop and clear the targets before proceeding further downrange. Final stage comes by charging up the 100 yard berm, and clearing the 200 and 300 yard targets. Great fun, and because you’re working against the clock, a real challenge to one’s precision rifle skills.

We ended the day with the new “Battleground” event, designed to push shooters to the limit of their practical rifle skills. You begin with a full field load of gear and ammo. Stage 1 consists of another run through Counterattack, but this time, you don’t get to catch your breath after the 100 yard berm. Instead, with the clock still running, you safe your rifle (mags out, bolts locked open, safeties on) and move as fast as you can across about 75 yards of broken ground to the next range.

Once there, you shoot Stage 2 of Battleground by loading your rifle and firing the “really quick and dirty” AQT. That means that after all of that movement in full gear, you have to fire ten rounds standing at the standard 25M Quick and Dirty single-sheet AQT target, ten rounds from the sitting position, and then 20 more rounds at the prone rapid and slow-fire targets. The only concession from the standard QD AQT is that shooters are allowed to fire each stage with loaded mags, changing them as needed.

By this time, my rifle barrel was smoking, I was wheezing and panting, and I was down to my last loaded mag. But the fun wasn’t over yet, as we moved with the clock still running to the other end of the firing line. Stage 3 is the popular “Bunker” drill, designed to test a team’s ability to deliver accurate fire against multiple targets. To emphasize accurate fire, each target is scored for points.

Our three-man team had to engage five of the 25M standing targets at 100 yards, with each shooter being limited to a single 20-round mag. We assigned targets on the run, dropped into prone, and cut loose. When the last shot was fired, the clock stopped.

Battleground is scored by counting the team point totals from Stages 2 and 3, and dividing that amount by the total elapsed time in seconds. Our team score totaled 598 points and the elapsed time was 570 seconds (9.5 minutes), which makes a score of 1.05 points per second. Come on down for our March 19th Rapid-Fire Clinic and see if you can beat it!

Lessons Learned:
1. 300 rounds of ammo (five mags and 200 rounds in strippers), plus 2 canteens, weighs a lot! Until I put my gear through the test of actual use, I didn’t know what worked and what didn’t.

2. Walking briskly with rifle and gear up a decent hill is a whole lot different than sauntering casually across to the firing line. The impact of my thudding heart and my wheezing lungs made a HUGE difference in my ability even to form a sight picture, let alone maintain it to fire a good shot. Experiencing that difference just once is worth more than a thousand lectures about losing weight and getting fit. Bottom line -- aerobic training is just as important as marksmanship training.

3. There’s a huge practical difference between 5 mags (rifle plus 4 spares) and 4 mags. Make sure you have enough reliable mags for your rifle, plus a good way to carry them.

4. It was almost impossible for me to reload mags under the time pressure. My drills going forward will include figuring out how to do so; any suggestions will be VERY welcome!

See ya on March 19th!
 

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Man that sounds like a blast and test of human ability I'm going to have find time to make it up there to one Fred's shoot's.
 

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Fred's RWVA Road Show??

cabinboy95,

Is there any outside chance that Fred would consider providing some of this invaluable training on the other side of the Mississippi? I think if a place in Arizona could be utilized, then a whole lot of us California, AZ, New Mexico residents would make the drive.

Dude
 

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Re: Fred's RWVA Road Show??

Dude said:
cabinboy95,

Is there any outside chance that Fred would consider providing some of this invaluable training on the other side of the Mississippi? I think if a place in Arizona could be utilized, then a whole lot of us California, AZ, New Mexico residents would make the drive.

Dude
Dude,

I spoke too Jack at Fred's last week while ordering some stocks and catching up on chit chat. He has a plan too try too work something out in the Las Vegas Area for a central location for AZ, PRK and surrounding states.

I sent Different Email but if someone else would like too help put something together let me know and I will get you in touch with Jack.

Karsten
 

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I'm curious of the legalities crossing state lines with a whole lot of ammo n rifle(s).....any concerns if i was pulled over?..thinking of driving down east coast for this sometime

RED DOT
 

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reloadingtips

Cabinboy95, GET THE MAGPULLS!! They're those rubber deals that fit on the end of your mags with the loop protruding for your finger. Put your mags in upside down facing backwards so when you pull em out they're facing forward and rightside up ready to insert. Practice, practice, practice! I also have a slice of the GI sleeping mat cut to fit in the bottom of my mag pouches to prevent damaging my feed lips. Keep a carabiner on your non shooting shoulder to clip empty mags to quick when "they're in the wire!!!" I love shooting the AQT and hope to meet all the RWVA folks and show up for one of their shoots.
 

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RED DOT said:
I'm curious of the legalities crossing state lines with a whole lot of ammo n rifle(s).....any concerns if i was pulled over?..thinking of driving down east coast for this sometime

RED DOT
as long as they're unloaded and secured (ie: locked in the trunk) as long as the guns are legal where you live, and legal where you're going, you're fine. theoretically.

i forget the law's number, but it is a fed law on the books. doesn't mean Deputy Billy Bob in BFE, TX will know it tho.

chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
A few thoughts:

1) Re magpulls, they would take some of the hassle out of pulling the mags out of my scrounged M16 mag pouches. My real headache came after I shot dry all my mags and was trying to reload a mag while the clock was running. Ugly.

I asked a vet who was also shooting Battleground for thoughts on what GI procedure was and he said, "Grab the nearest rifle and mags from a guy who isn't going to need 'em anymore."

Any ideas on speedloading mags (w/ or w/o the mag "spoon") under field conditions will be appreciated.

2) No videos or pics this time; we'll try to have something set up for the 3/19 event. You'll see 'em here and across the street asap.

3) The RWVA crowd is planning to do a Western event this summer; dates/location TBD. You Western guys -- any thoughts on suitability of this place?

Boulder City

Vegas would work as we would have decent, fairly gun-friendly air transport nearby, plus it's a doable drive from Kali and elsewhere in the SW.

We need input and volunteers to handle a lot of things associated with such an event, so pls drop me a note at [email protected] if you want to help out.

4) Re travel with ammo and battle rifles, safest is to have both gun cases and ammo cases locked in your trunk, while driving at or near the speed limit with your vehicle's paperwork and lights, etc. all OK. Anybody coming from the NE is wise to avoid the DC/Capitol area for obvious reasons. I-81 to US 220 South at Roanoke, VA will get you to the Greensboro, NC area, from which getting to the RWVA range is a breeze. Drop me a line or go to www.rwva.com if you need directions.
 

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"Any ideas on speedloading mags (w/ or w/o the mag "spoon") under field conditions will be appreciated. "

Poor man's mag-pulls: paracord with the core stripped out, sheath only, tied into a loop big enough to be of use and hide the knot underneath the floorplate. Or make some duct tape tabs.

Speedloading mags: if you still have your stripper clip guide on the rifle, loading through the top of the rifle seems to be easier than trying to hold onto a loose mag and attached charger. The end of the cleaning rod handle/combo tool has a couple of indented arcs across it. The end of the tool is intended to be used as a driver in your fist, a more powerful thing than a thumb, to push the rounds through the stripper and into the magazine. Or with mags out of the rifle, the stripper clip can be put into the charger lips, then hold the mag/charger/loaded clip up against a stable object (rifle buttplate?) and push hard.
 

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Fancy Poor Man's Mag Pulls

I wrote this for another board a while back, Note original idea wasn't mine....I read it somewhere. Just use larger Zip Ties and a long lenght of Para Cord.

*************************************************************

*Making a Zip Tie MagPul*
By Karsten
November 2003
This is not intended to belittle the MagPul in any way......Just another "You too can do it Cheap" article.

Gut the 550 cord, if you are planning to do say 20-30 mags....cut off one big length of cord. Next is gut the cord and save the guts for later use.

Get mags, Zip Ties and Para Cord ready as we are going to town.

Remove the floor plate, spring and follower. Note, this would be a good time to wash all the grime out of the inside of the mag.

For USGI 30's you might want to also upgrade to the green followers as well.

http://www.imagestation.com/album/pictures.html?id=4290765917&idx=29

With the length of 550 Cord slipped over the Zip Tie, remove the excess and lightly melt the ends of the cord.

http://www.imagestation.com/album/pictures.html?id=4290765917&idx=30

Put the mag back together and some tweaking of the floor plate may be required, but should not hamper the function in any way.

http://www.imagestation.com/album/pictures.html?id=4290765917&idx=28

For what 1 MagPul costs you can do a dozen mags and not worry about the fact you might have drop a few and leave them behind.

Karsten
 
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