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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Financially times are tough for alot of people right now. Consider going to a dollar store & stocking up on some Ramen noodles. They are quite cheap to purchase.
Another cheap thing to buy is mac & cheese. Canned tuna fish can be added to it.

I know alot of people say to stock up on rice but rice will get boring real quick by itself.

HH
 

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I like ramen noodles just as much as anybody else. However, they don't offer that much nutritional value, especially when compared to beans and rice as suggested prior. Also, the flavor packets are loaded with salt. If you want to eat healthy on the cheap, then beans are the way to go. The one disadvantage with beans is that they require a lot of water to prepare.

That being said, I eat ramen noodles all the time. They are just too easy to cook not to keep on hand.
 

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I love beans but if someone in the family has kidney problems you must remember that beans are very high in Protein. High amounts of Protein can be hard for the body to handle. Put some fat back in the beans and it comes closer to something you might be able to live on, plus some tabasco sauce.
 

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Avoid Ramen Noodles, they provide so little nutrition, if any, that you will get scurvy if you try to live off them. I personnally know someone who was on hard times and tried to live off Ramen Noodles, when he got scurvy he did not know what it was, and so he went to see a doctor. The doctor did not recognize it, as it is rarely seen these days. After some research, he was diagnosed, and told to eat some fruit and vegetables. He made a full recovery.

Beans and rice are cheaper in bulk, provide nutrition as well as a complete protien when eaten together. Other grains such oats and wheat are also good to have in bulk.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes, Ramen noodles have 0% vitamin C. But I suspect rice & beans would be 0% also.

But that is part of needing to eat a variety of foods.

My point on the Ramen noodles is you can spend little money & put some food stores up.

HH
 

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Whenever I eat Ramen Noodles, there's no way I can stomach using the entire flavor packet...yuk! I might use half of it at the MOST. It takes very little salt to make me happy.

I find it easy to get burnt out on the things, but then again I find it easy to get burnt out even on things I really really love (A1 Steakhouse Burger from Burger King, anyone?)...
 

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Yes, Ramen noodles have 0% vitamin C. But I suspect rice & beans would be 0% also.

But that is part of needing to eat a variety of foods.

My point on the Ramen noodles is you can spend little money & put some food stores up.

HH
One serving of kidney beans has 119% of your daily requirement of vitiman C. I have not researched all beans, but they are better for you than most people realize.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yes, but then too, kidney beans have 0% vitamin A. So again, it comes down to having a variety of foods.

HH
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Here's the top foods with vitamin C:
•Sweet red bell peppers
•Parsley
•Broccoli
•Cauliflower
•Strawberries
•Mustard greens
•Papaya
•Grapefruit
•Kiwi
•Oranges
•Cantaloupe
•Cabbage
•Tomatoes
•Raspberries
•Celery
•Spinach
•Pineapple
•Watermelon
•Tangerines
•Limes
•Cranberries
•Guava
 

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im not much into the survivalist thing, but a few packages of ramen noodle, and a bottle of vitamins well keep you going for a few days. both store for a long time.
 

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True Ramen Noodles offer little in the way of vitamins/minerals, but they are a good base to start out with. Adding a little real onions/chives/meat/vegetables etc., will add some nutrients to the mix. Even using some friezed dried meat will give a little more change to the meal. I've known people that lived on these for awhile w/o having the proplems explained above. One thing, they are cheap portable meal, and can be stored for awhile if kept dry. If you want vitamins/minerals crush up a "One-a-Day" Vitamin tablet, and throw it in the mix. One of my priorities for SHTF, is having a 2yr supply of multi-vitamins on hand. There is going to be a lot of eating habits change, if/when SHTF. dozier
 

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im not much into the survivalist thing, but a few packages of ramen noodle, and a bottle of vitamins well keep you going for a few days. both store for a long time.
Good point, vacuum pack some vitimans for long term storage, a good multi vitiman as well as vitiman D & C.
 

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Good point, vacuum pack some vitimans for long term storage, a good multi vitiman as well as vitiman D & C.
I wouldn't even open the original containers of Vitamins until you are ready to use them, as all come sealed to begin with. Some even have oxygen absorbant in the bottles. Expiration dates vary from 2-4 yrs on different vitamins. Meaning that if they are unopened, probably longer. Rotate out by using the oldest first. Big bottles have like 250 one-a-day tabs. If you had 3-4 of these, you would still use them up before the expiration date. dozier
 

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Commonly held understanding in the Army these days is that the expiration date on drugs is put there by the manufacturer to bolster sales. See the article below to get a better understanding of the situation, and as always, make your own informed decisions.

I routinely use expired meds that I've kept clean, dry, cool, and dark.

Link to article

Expired Medications: Are They Safe to Use?
The expiration dates on some drugs may have little scientific meaning
Marc Lallanilla
March 04, 2009

If you're like most consumers, the drugs in your medicine cabinet have been there long past the expiration dates on their labels. But is it necessary to throw them all out when the ``Do Not Use After'' date has passed? The answer, quite often, is no.

Many drugs are still safe and effective as much as 15 years after their expiration date, according to research conducted since the 1980s by the Food and Drug Administration and the military, which has immense stockpiles of drugs to purchase, maintain and replace. Of the more than 100 drugs tested years after their expiration dates, 90% were found to have full potency.

American drug makers have been required since 1979 to label their products with a date up to which they will guarantee the drug's potency; this date is generally 2 to 3 years after it was manufactured. But the American Medical Association has determined that there is "little scientific basis" for these dates.

So are all medicines still good years after their expiration dates? No, some drugs, such as insulin, nitroglycerin and certain antibiotics need to be used by their expiration date or safely discarded. The epinephrine in EpiPen injections -- used to treat severe allergic reactions -- should also not be used after its expiration date.

Proper storage of drugs is probably the most critical factor in long-term drug safety and potency. It's important to remember that the aforementioned drugs tested by the FDA and the military were stored under exacting laboratory conditions. Ironically, your bathroom's medicine chest may be one of the worst places in your home to store drugs, as temperature changes and humidity from showers can quickly degrade drugs. The same holds true for storing drugs in kitchen cabinets, where dishwasher steam and hot air from cooking appliances may diminish potency.

Store your drugs away from children and pets in a dark area where the temperatures are cool and stable, such as a dresser drawer. Your refrigerator might be an ideal storage environment if dampness is not a factor. Don't mix different drugs in one container, and make sure all caps and lids are securely sealed.

In general, pills and capsules are more stable than drugs in liquid form, but if pills have turned powdery, are discolored or have a strong smell, they should be discarded. Similarly, avoid using any medicated liquids that are cloudy or filmy, or creams that are cracked or hardened.

And if you're unsure whether a particular drug is safe to use after its expiration date, your best source for information is your doctor or pharmacist.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
For a few days of hard times you can get by without food but you'll need water. Power outage, snowed in, trees down on the roads, etc something in the belly is better then nothing & anyone can afford to put up some Ramen noodles. I think 8 in a big pack for $1.

HH
 
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