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Bought my 10 year old a Henry youth model lever action 22 for Christmas.

Yesterday was his first time out. We focused mostly on safety and proper technique, not marksmanship, but at 25 yards he managed to do pretty well.

So, my question for you Henry owners is: How the HECK do you clean this thing? I've owned all sorts of rifles and pistols, and each of them have some degree of field stripping for cleaning. The Henry manual does not offer ANY insight into what to clean, but it does state no disassembly is required.

Any advice?
 

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Howdy,

Other than swabbing out the chamber and 'carefully' running cleaning patch through the barrel, I don't do a thing.

Great rifle. Bought the pretty target model for my wife.

Made in USA!

v/r,
Bear
 

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I have owned two Henry's for quite some time, a .22 mag Golden Boy and a .22 lr, both lever actions. Most of the time, all you need to do is clean the barrel just like you would any other rifle and then clean the bolt face, chamber area, and extractor with Q-tips that have been soaked in Hoppe's no.9, followed by dry Q-tips. Make sure you do it in that order, as cleaning the bolt first will cause you to have to clean it again once the barrel has been cleaned due to having to clean the barrel from the muzzle end. Since the barrel must be cleaned this way, I recommend a one-piece cleaning rod so that you won't damage the muzzle crown while cleaning the barrel. After all that is done, I pull the lever all the way down and then wipe off the back of the exposed bolt and rub a little oil on it. I suggest performing the above after every couple hundred rounds or so.
Also, and this doesn't need to be done very often at all unless the gun or ammo gets wet, but every once in a while, run a patch with a very light coat of oil on it down the magazine tube and rub in a couple of oil drops on the magazine tube assy (brass tube with internal spring). I learned this the hard way one time after I must have inserted a wet round. The magazine assy was almost rusted to the magazine tube itself.
A few years after the warranty expired on my Golden Boy, the damn firing pin broke. I had fired several thousand rounds through it and decided to completely dis-assemble the gun and try to order a replacement pin myself and install it. Once the gun was dis-assembled, I was surprised at how remarkably clean it was inside, which is probably why they (the company) tell you that dis-assembly is not necessary. The only area that was really dirty was the receiver area above and closest to the chamber.
To actually take the gun apart, just remove every screw on the receiver and on the tang. The lever and trigger assy will slide out of the bottom and after that is removed, you can pull the bolt out of the back of the receiver.
These guns are remarkably well made with the only flaw, I see, being the firing pin. It's made out of a flat piece of steel that drops into the top of the bolt with a very flimsy looking nipple that extends off of the rest of the pin through the bolt.
As far as fixing the gun yourself, you can't order replacement parts besides magazine tubes, loop levers, etc. I had to send the gun back to the factory after first placing a call to them. Everyone at Henry is family and they are very friendly. I sent my gun out and had it back in 6 days fully repaired at no charge, even though the warranty had expired years ago.

Hope this helps! If you have any other questions, feel free to PM me!

Motown out


ARMY1
 

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I own the Henry Frontier model and it is pretty darn accurate. I use a Bore Snake and clean whatever I can reach with cotton swabs. I apply a little bit of oil to surfaces I don't want to rust and I am done.

I don't get too excited about doing a GI cleaning job on my .22 rifles.
 

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I don't own a henry but I'd suggest the bore snake or one of the cable type flexible rods like Otis. Insert it down the muzzle and out the chamber. Screw on the brush and pull it out in the right direction pulling the crud with it, instead of pushing it into the action with a rod.

Honestly I'm thinking for a .22 the bore snake would be sufficient if used on a semi regular basis but the flexible cable type would allow a more thorough cleaning if heavily leaded up.

ETA- Obviously you'd want to drop the bore snake weight from the chamber to the muzzle and pull that way.
 

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Found this on the web - maybe it will help. Not sure if it applies to the brass framed models...


The Henry .22 is made to look like the classic lever-action weapons of the Old West
The Henry lever-action .22-caliber rifle is a modern-day replica of the old Henry Repeater from the late 1800s. As with all firearms, it is important to know how to take apart your Henry rifle for cleaning and repair purposes.

Instructions
Things You'll Need:
 Flat head screwdriver
1. 1
Rack the lever action several times to remove any live ammunition that may be chambered in the weapon or stored in the magazine. Clearing your firearm of all live ammo should always be your first step when working on a rifle.
2. 2
Loosen and remove the four screws on the left and right faces of the receiver with your screwdriver.
3. 3
Loosen and remove the single screw on the top of the stock, just behind the receiver assembly.
4. 4
Pull the stock backwards and off the main receiver assembly.
5. 5
Lift the receiver cover up and off the main assembly and set it aside. This will expose the bolt.
6. 6
Pull the lever forward to push the bolt backwards far enough so that you can grip it and remove it from the assembly.
 

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I have a standard Henry and honestly haven't cleaned it much at all. I usually shoot copper coated rounds and they still go predictably straight. I have used a bore snake with good success a couple times...
Awesome, accurate guns.
 

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Here's A Video

Bought my 10 year old a Henry youth model lever action 22 for Christmas.

Yesterday was his first time out. We focused mostly on safety and proper technique, not marksmanship, but at 25 yards he managed to do pretty well.

So, my question for you Henry owners is: How the HECK do you clean this thing? I've owned all sorts of rifles and pistols, and each of them have some degree of field stripping for cleaning. The Henry manual does not offer ANY insight into what to clean, but it does state no disassembly is required.

Any advice?
PSub,

Here's a video showing how to take the cover off over at Rimfire Central:

http://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums/showpost.php?p=2997814&postcount=20

I've had a Henry H001T Frontier for about a year now,, and taken the cover off a couple time's to clean and lubricate it.

Not necessary for every cleaning though. Henry suggested to me to clean the Bore, front of Bolt, and Chamber area after about 2 to 300 rounds useing rods from the muzzle, and the Dewey Muzzle Bore Guide. The manual says ok to use Hoppes #9,, that's good cause thats what I use on all my guns.

JoeUSA2
 

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I just got my henry 44 mares leg and wanted to know what to use on the brass. It gets pretty dirty pretty quick since I'm shooting on the Florida Gulf Coast and I sweat like a pig. Also I noticed the shooting gloves I wore left small polka dots on the brass. What should I use.
 

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Otis Cleaning System

I use the Otis System on all of my semi auto and lever action rifles. Insert it at the chamber end and pull it through to the muzzle, that eliminates any damage to the crown. The Otis kit contains everything needed to clean all your guns from .22 cal. up to 12 Ga. shotgun.

Rich
 

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I use a bore snake on mine occasionally, .22 bores don't need cleaning very often in my opinion. Take the cover off once year, see the video above, and clean with #9 and q-tips to get the crud off and blow it dry with shop air and lubricate with an oil of your choice. I shoot mine about 2000 rounds a year and this seems to work. If you have any problems with it just call Henry and they will take care of it. Best customer service I have ever seen.
 

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I just got my henry 44 mares leg and wanted to know what to use on the brass. It gets pretty dirty pretty quick since I'm shooting on the Florida Gulf Coast and I sweat like a pig. Also I noticed the shooting gloves I wore left small polka dots on the brass. What should I use.
Clean the oils and loose gunk off the brass with 90% rubbing alcohol and soft clean terry cloth. Then get some Simichrome polish and some clean soft cotton scraps (underwears and t shirt pieces), and gently polish away any oxidation. If you follow the directions on the tube, you will end up with a mirror shine.
 

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I just got my henry 44 mares leg and wanted to know what to use on the brass. It gets pretty dirty pretty quick since I'm shooting on the Florida Gulf Coast and I sweat like a pig. Also I noticed the shooting gloves I wore left small polka dots on the brass. What should I use.
Get yourself some Flitz polish and wax. They sell it as a kit or individually. The Flitz polish works better than barrasso and your cloth with turn blue/purple as it removes the oxidation. The wax will help keep the fingerprints off and also great for the stock. Stay away from oily or waxy chemicals on the receiver as they seem to smear and hold fingerprints. I have the Big Boy with the brass receiver in .44 mag and the Flitz seems to work the best with a follow up with a microfiber cloth!
 
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