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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello All,

I recently decided to go over my garand with a fine tooth comb to see if all was legit and correct as I was told it was when I bought it, ( I was fairly new and dumb about guns in general ). Well as it turns out it is definitely not all correct. I visited the page "usriflecal30m1.com" and typed in my S/N number too see what parts should be on there, and I am happy to say I have acquired most of these parts for a decent price to make it a "parts correct" Garand, and I have located the few parts left to get, just need to make a deal for them. My main issue is my Garand is a SA May 1944 issue, my barrel is dated SA Dec. 1950, it does shoot just fine and appears to be in pretty decent shape over all, I have not been able to locate a May 1944 barrel or even a 1944 barrel at all! So my question is what would be best for my rifles purity/ over all value? Keep the 1950 barrel or go brand new and get either a Criterion or Kriger Barrel?

Any advice at all or if you know a place where I might be able to get the correct barrel would be greatly appreciated.

This thread will include pics when I actually start the full rebuild process.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
ok cool, I could check that out, not a member yet, but I will sign up for sure,

thanks
 

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Any military rifle is only correct ONCE. When it left the factory. Attempts to make a mixmaster 'correct' is, to me a waste of time and money and if not stated up front is fakery. The time and dollars spent in such an endeavor is much better spent enjoying the sport, buying ammo and shooting. JMHO.
 

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+1 on what mercman said.
 

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Correcting a rifle, the older it is, becomes an exercise in financial futility.

For a couple years, Post-War Springfield and HRA were very easy to correct. Parts were everywhere thanks to the CMP mixing up Bolts, Op-Rods, Trigger Groups and Gas Cylinders. Just trading parts was the norm, and cost only shipping.

WW2 is a whole new ballgame. Unless its something you want to do for the sake of doing it (Hobby), it monetarily gains you very little. Just a stock or an op-rod? I'd say do it. Barrels are a waste of money.
 

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You can't correct a rifle.

It's either had parts removed and mixed or it hasnt.
 

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I wouldn't get too worked up about an M1 having a replacement barrel, especially if it was built at SA, and then rebarreled with an SA barrel. There were 6.25 million produced, and not all of them can be "correct and original". Even if you put correct parts on it, it's still not an original rifle.

If it shoots good, i.e. little throat and muzzle erosion, enjoy the rifle.

Life is too short to chase one's tail over small things.
 

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Any military rifle is only correct ONCE. When it left the factory. Attempts to make a mixmaster 'correct' is, to me a waste of time and money and if not stated up front is fakery. The time and dollars spent in such an endeavor is much better spent enjoying the sport, buying ammo and shooting. JMHO.
Not true, the rifle when leaving the factory is a Original rifle. Replacing parts to make it as it was when it left the factory is a Correct built rifle.
There is a huge difference between a Origonal rifle and a Correct rifle
May be a waste of time and money to you but many do it for the hunt of parts and satisfaction of the build.
 

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Amen to that. I got a June 43 I've been working on correcting. I was fortunate enough that I was three parts short. The follower arm, stock, and barrel. I've since found the arm, tracked down a decent EMcF stock, and am now searching for the barrel.

If anything, I've found great joy in searching for these parts in that I find myself asking a lot of questions to Garand gurus and learning a whole lot more if I just shot it. If I just shot it, I don't think I would have been involved as much I should. Just another rifle to shoot.

In any event, be prepared to pay a premium on any WWII parts. Also, depending on when your rifle receiver date is, what I was told is three months before and three months after the date would be a correct barrel to your rifle.
 

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Any advice at all or if you know a place where I might be able to get the correct barrel would be greatly appreciated.
Best place I can think of would be the CMP Forum. It's sort of crazy there right now, with everyone frothing at the mouth like Pavlovian rabid dogs over the recent IHC release. But it's probably the best place to find the Garand parts you need.

http://forums.thecmp.org/

Good shootin.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
This is more of a hobby to me, I will never sell my garand even if i end up homeless in a ditch I will wear it on my back, the hunt for the right parts has been a lot of fun, just as much as I enjoyed shooting it. Most parts I have been able to get for $30 or under with trades, I had WRA, HRA, and IHC parts on it that others were looking for so its a win for both parties, I know the rifle will never be original, but a parts correct rifle is what I aim for.
 

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This is more of a hobby to me, I will never sell my garand even if i end up homeless in a ditch I will wear it on my back, the hunt for the right parts has been a lot of fun, just as much as I enjoyed shooting it. Most parts I have been able to get for $30 or under with trades, I had WRA, HRA, and IHC parts on it that others were looking for so its a win for both parties, I know the rifle will never be original, but a parts correct rifle is what I aim for.
The question is when/if you sell it will you state up front that the rifle was altered to make it 'correct'? Personally I think that making a distinction between 'correct' and 'original' is BS. After the weapon is sold or traded a few times there will now be a perception that the rifle is the 'real deal' and not altered to appear to be original, correct or as from the factory or whatever term is used.

The CMP description of a Correct Grade M1 Garand:

CORRECT GRADE: (Very Good to Excellent)
AVAILABLE ON THE CMP AUCTION SITE ONLY
Correct Grade Rifles are similar to the Service Grade (above), but will show less wear and use. Correct Grade rifles will have all correct parts for the date of manufacture with 80% or better overall original metal finish. The stock and handguards will be of walnut and correct for the rifle but will have some dings, dents, scratches and marring of the wood finish. Stocks will have the appropriate original inspector's cartouche. The rifle bore will be very good with no significant defects and with a throat erosion of less than 4 and a muzzle wear of 2 or less. Very good to excellent condition. This grade is rare and is only available occasionally in limited quantities. Because of the scarcity of these rifles, they will only be sold on the CMP auction site at cmpauction.thecmp.org. My emphasis.
 

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if the barrel you have shoots to your satisfaction, dont mess with it. as far as correct rifles, there are very very few all original correct rifles out there. virtually all of them you encounter have been pieced together, including the ones the CMP sells as correct grade rifles now days.
 

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You can probably, maybe, find a correct barrel. Chances are very high that it will be a shot out piece of-o-crap. Ya wanna shoot it or look at it?
Tread lightly on the CMP forum. They are a twitchy bunch.
 

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correct rifle

I have over 30 Garands in my personal collection and my advice is keep looking for the correct barrel. They are out there and it may take some time and unfortunately, money. Be patient, just keep gathering all the parts you need and sooner or later you'll find them all. Your rifle will be more valuable to your collection and you'll be restoring a real piece of history. I'd rather have the correct barrel on my rifle and maybe not have it shoot as good as a better/newer barrel but if you want a real shooter, then buy or build one.
 

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Another thing to consider is that there can be interesting history in the rifle in its current configuration. A friend in town had a 1944 receiver with a 12/46 barrel on it, the stock had an SHM cartouche and a DAS stamp. Looking at the parts as a whole, instead of individual pieces, indicated pretty strongly that the rifle was fixed up during the post WWII clean and repair period (thus the 1946 barrel and SHM cartouche) and then went back through at a later point in the 50's or 60's before they started marking the receiver legs with electro-pencil engravings during overhaul.

While you can't ever prove it, everything I saw about that rifle indicated that it was exactly as it had been when it left Springfield Armory in 1946 during the clean and repair program. I think that rifle, in its configuration was much more interesting than if it had been corrected to 1944 configuration.
 

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Everybody has their own opinions and they are more than happy to call the other camp idiots. Think of it as a religious discussion. Decide what you want to do and who really cares what the people who don't agree with think.

Many people don't understand the difference between original (the actual parts that left the factory together) and correct (parts correct for the point of manufacture of the serial number of the receiver).

My personal preference for correcting a rifle is to start with at least what appear to be the original barrel/receiver combination. As far as value goes, you will probably be hard pressed to get more $$$ for your gun than you have in it after correcting it unless you got great deals on the parts and did a great job of wear matching.

If your are really wanting a gun that shoots as well as possible, abandon correct and go with the best parts you can find and read up on accurizing the Garand.

Do what makes you happy and satisfied.
 

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The question is when/if you sell it will you state up front that the rifle was altered to make it 'correct'? Personally I think that making a distinction between 'correct' and 'original' is BS. After the weapon is sold or traded a few times there will now be a perception that the rifle is the 'real deal' and not altered to appear to be original, correct or as from the factory or whatever term is used.

The CMP description of a Correct Grade M1 Garand:

CORRECT GRADE: (Very Good to Excellent)
AVAILABLE ON THE CMP AUCTION SITE ONLY
Correct Grade Rifles are similar to the Service Grade (above), but will show less wear and use. Correct Grade rifles will have all correct parts for the date of manufacture with 80% or better overall original metal finish. The stock and handguards will be of walnut and correct for the rifle but will have some dings, dents, scratches and marring of the wood finish. Stocks will have the appropriate original inspector's cartouche. The rifle bore will be very good with no significant defects and with a throat erosion of less than 4 and a muzzle wear of 2 or less. Very good to excellent condition. This grade is rare and is only available occasionally in limited quantities. Because of the scarcity of these rifles, they will only be sold on the CMP auction site at cmpauction.thecmp.org. My emphasis.
You do know that CMP Correct Grades may have repalced parts so rifle can be sold as Correct???
Orest has stated several times they do not build Correct Grades but if they see a rifle that is missing a few small parts to be Correct they will change them .
Bottom line , any collector knows that any rifle with all Correct parts is more than likely not a Original rifle. Only with very close inspection or provinance can you make a assumption with any degree of accuracy that a rifle may be Original
 

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About barrel date , barrels were made and stockpiled, highly unlikely that a original May rifle would have a May barrel. Most M1's had barrels that predated the reveiver up to about 3 months so a correct barrel would be Feb-April.
 
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