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I've noticed that sometimes my support hand (left hand) naturally comes up with my fingers at rest on the oprod. If I use this grip and tighten my fingers down on the oprod, can this cause the rifle to fail to lock into battery since the pressure might slow down the oprod (eg: round is picked up by oprod but bolt does not rotate completely closed in the chamber) ? Is there a "correct" way to support the rifle with my non-trigger hand?
 

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When shooting from positions other than prone (sitting or standing) it is common for the supporting hand to come as far back as the op rod. It's a good idea to make sure your fingers do not contact the op rod. Not because of the possibility of slow bolt movement from the drag on the op rod, but because it may effect accuracy. That and you wouldn't want your fingers to be impacted by the op rod handle. Take care to keep your fingers open enough to avoid contact.
 

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When shooting from positions other than prone (sitting or standing) it is common for the supporting hand to come as far back as the op rod. It's a good idea to make sure your fingers do not contact the op rod. Not because of the possibility of slow bolt movement from the drag on the op rod, but because it may effect accuracy. That and you wouldn't want your fingers to be impacted by the op rod handle. Take care to keep your fingers open enough to avoid contact.[/QUOTE]

Could not have said it better, myself. Great post.
 

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Weakhand support

jcl89, When we run our Garand clinics we teach that the weak hand should not "grip" the forearm of the rifle but rather support the rifle. I think of the weak hand as I would a front shooting rest off a bench, ie. support the rifle don't hold it. I believe this applies to all rifles in position shooting. This technique prevents contact with the op-rod and prevents muscle input being applied to the fore part of the rifle when shooting if you change your grip pressure.

Generally, most shooters move the left hand as far forward as possible when using the sling in prone or sitting.

In the off-hand position there are many different ways to support the rifle; left hand cupped rearward around the magazine, left hand reversed with the thumb on the right in front of the magazine, thumb on the left in front of the magazine etc.

You may want to look at some of the USAMU videos on the CMP website.

I hope I have helped some. Good shooting. "T"
 
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