M14 Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,677 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
You have heard the terms "Proofed" or "Proof Fired". These terms indicate the item passed a test procedure. This applies to all US GI firearms, not just the M14.

Each Barrel, Bolt, and assembled rifle/carbine/machine gun is fired with a High Pressure Test Round, also known as a Proof Round. The cartridge has much higher pressure than service ammunition. In the postwar period afterwards the barrel or bolt would be "magafluxed, or magnetic particle tested", to check for cracks.

After firing the Bolt, Barrel, Receiver and in the case of an assembled rifle, the stock, are all marked as an indication of passing the high pressure test.

The marks are as follows:

Stock: P in a circle or square
Bolt: PR!CK punch mark and some can have an M either inscribed in electric pencil (M14, M16) or white paint stamped on the body (Carbine) indicating it was magnetic particle tested.
Receiver: PR!CK Punch Mark
Barrel: P for Proofed, M for Magnafluxed or Magnetic Particle Tested

Do not be surprised if occassionally you see a barrel with two P's or a bolt with two punch marks. If a barrel was destined to be a spare part, it was proofed. Later on if it needed for assembly into a rifle, it was proofed again as a rifle. Sometimes two marks will be present, but not always. Occassionally on a Garand bolt you will see two punch marks, as it went through rebuild and both times it was marked.

Here is a picture of the M1 Carbine being proof fired. Notice the protective cradle. The weapons are fired remotely because occassionally one will detonate due to structural failure. The right side shows a stripped barrel being proof fired.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,677 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Part II:

As shown above this applies to all US GI weapons. Here are the specifics for the M1 and M14. It is descibed in detail in some NM publications.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
329 Posts
Thanks for the info. I have the ***** mark on both my bolts, and also the electro-pen "M". Didn't know what the M was and previous to your post thought that someone had just inscribed an initial. I thought of it in a negative way as if someone had defaced the bolt. Now I know better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
543 Posts
Mr Ricca,
I have a T44E4 barrel that I got from a T44E4 receiver stub. The receiver has 67 marked on it on the right side under the stock line. Is this the rebuild date? Also, the barrel has multiple markings, both Ps and ones I can't make out. Are these from it being proofed multiple times? Also, there is a tiny DAS stamp on the barrel just in front of the receiver. The only other items I have seen this on are some Winchester op rods and M2 bipods. Why was the DAS put on these items? I will try to post pics tonight.
Thanks,
Dustin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
543 Posts
Here is the top of the receiver which has no proof mark


Here is the side of the receiver with a 2?-67 electro penciled on it


Here are some of the barrel markings including a DAS, at least 2 Ps, a T, an H?, and others
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
543 Posts
Bill,
If you enlarge the second pic you can see a tiny DAS just below the right handguard clip groove and right in front of the receiver. It is very hard to see, but I am positive it is a DAS. The drawing number is, of course, F7267002.

Dustin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,677 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I have an SA Ordnance Report on the T44E4 showing each part and drawing number. It is buried. I will have to dig it out to answer your questions.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,876 Posts
Yes that’s the same picture RG posted on the other thread about the early bolt.

Of Pezboy T44 barrel stamped 55.


REN
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
3,779 Posts
Very interesting thread Bill started. I wonder why the armorys put so much effort into proofing weapons during fabrication while today cobbling together weapons in ones garage is common place and acceptable. Do modern manufacturers like Colt, Ruger, S&W, SAI etc. proof fire weapons with a SAMMI specification proof cartridges before they leave the plant? I hope so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
I believe that any Remington rifle with the barrel stamp “REP” in a circle has been proof fired as that stamp stands for “Remington English Proof”. And the “M” circle stamp seen on the M24’s in various locations such as the barrel, bolt handle and floorplate denotes magnaflux inspection.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,257 Posts
HPT and Proof Firing

I know the military still does the Proof Rd testing, and they have the equipment to analyze the metal afterward for defects or issues, but most facilities probably don't have the capability to do the type of metallurgic analysis required after a High Pressure Test round.

FWIW, I have a partial box of 1955 dated HPT rounds that would have been used on the original T44E4s made back in 1955. The cases are made of steel and the box has a huge 'DANGEROUS' label on it - they are indeed dangerous outside of a very controlled environment. Remington might do this testing as perhaps some other major manufactures that supply weapons to the US military.
 

Attachments

·
Read Only
Joined
·
3,779 Posts
I bought a S&W at a Rod and Gun in Germany. The Germans proof tested it after importation by the supplier to R&G. It has nitro proof stamps on the cyl , barrel and frame. I guess they don’t trust the quality of S&W.
 

·
Registered
Extensive M1 Carbine and Rifle collections with current focus on standardized Army rifled arms
Joined
·
45 Posts
German Proof...

The Germans have regulations that go back to before the last century.

No firearm may be sold unless it passes through the BeschussAmt… government proof house or a factory proof house working with approval and processes of the proof house.

You'll find many firearms from other nations and even custom gunsmiths bearing BeschussAmt marks. The funniest one I saw over there was a .45 cal Liberator pistol. It was shown at a government display showing why their proofing was required. The barrel was blown out by the government proof round.

American arms are chambered to SAAMI standards, while Europe uses CIP standards. An arm perfectly chambered to SAAMI can fail the CIP headspace gauges so American firms exporting need to assure their chambers are made at a dimension that works with both standards.

HPT proofing is an artifact from the days of black powder, inferior steels or barrels of wrapped iron/steel. There is great concern that a HPT round can damage a barrel that isn't in fact worthy of rejection. Most small arms firms today... especially AR makers... don't use HPT rounds. No problem.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top