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Next door to me lived a LAFD Captain and his advice on storing large amounts of powder in a residential home was to build a box of the proper size out of one inch "Outside Plywood" screwed together and a second layer of one inch over the first. Use wooden pegs and glued to secure to the first. The same for the led which should be a drop-in type.
He stated that the box would survive any house fire. Just a thought.
 

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I think if you covered it with Rockwool insulation it probably would. I've seen tests where they had unrelated chocolate bars inside Rockwool boxes after fire
 

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1” wooden box with a loose lid was the regulation when I took a course for a powder license in Germany. The goal was to delay the powder lighting off and worsening the fire before arrival of the fire department.
 

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One of the safety trick I found was to store your powder in a box and cover with a number of those gel bags that they use to refrigerate and keep things cold. And do not use a tightly sealed lid. Just enough to keep the moisture out.
If the powder ever gets hot enough to combust the gel bags will burn through and give some retardation to the ignition.
Smokeless powder is a propellant, not an explosive and the gel will do a lot to help control it
 

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his advice on storing large amounts of powder in a residential home was to build a box of the proper size out of one inch "Outside Plywood" screwed together
CA Fire code requires a "powder magazine" constructed of 1" wood for Residental storage of 20lbs or more (but not to exceed 50lbs total) of smokeless powder. As for surviving a structure fire, he's not entirely wrong. In my 30 years experience as a firefighter in Los Angeles County, short of a fully involved structure that burns down to the foundations, a heavy wood box would "survive". But that's not the box's function, nor would the contents be salvageable. It's to prevent or delay powder ignition.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
CA Fire code requires a "powder magazine" constructed of 1" wood for Residental storage of 20lbs or more (but not to exceed 50lbs total) of smokeless powder. As for surviving a structure fire, he's not entirely wrong. In my 30 years experience as a firefighter in Los Angeles County, short of a fully involved structure that burns down to the foundations, a heavy wood box would "survive". But that's not the box's function, nor would the contents be salvageable. It's to prevent or delay powder ignition.
That's why the drop-in led and this was back in '68
Good input. Thanks.
 

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In my opinion,keeping moisture off the powder can be just as important as fire. When powder gets wet and dries again, it has completely different burning properties than before, this is neither visible nor noticeable. Till you use it for reloading...
The burn becomes explosive, not deflagrative. Few years ago a guy tried to shoot with one of our old Dragunovs and used more than 30 years old soviet ammunition. It almost destroyed the weapon with a lot of overpressure and a huge and also amazing fireball. :oops:😁
we suspected that there would be moisture at some point in the long period of storage.
 

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Hmmm, I have a large orange truck type tool box which I lined with asbestos board inside and out.

I filled bottom of the box with lead ingots to add weight.

Once I have my earth sheltered home built I'll align that box with a couple of my gun safes and set them on top of two steel I beams and drill and tap holes in the steel and bolt the whole shooting match to to the beams. That'll be about 3K pounds of weight loaded up.

I have Golden rod dehumidifiers in all my safes.
 

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Next door to me lived a LAFD Captain and his advice on storing large amounts of powder in a residential home was to build a box of the proper size out of one inch "Outside Plywood" screwed together and a second layer of one inch over the first. Use wooden pegs and glued to secure to the first. The same for the led which should be a drop-in type.
He stated that the box would survive any house fire. Just a thought.
Or buy an old chest freezer? You can also purchase fire board, which is similar to sheet rock and build a fire box.
 

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Hmmm, I have a large orange truck type tool box which I lined with asbestos board inside and out.

I filled bottom of the box with lead ingots to add weight.

Once I have my earth sheltered home built I'll align that box with a couple of my gun safes and set them on top of two steel I beams and drill and tap holes in the steel and bolt the whole shooting match to to the beams. That'll be about 3K pounds of weight loaded up.

I have Golden rod dehumidifiers in all my safes.
I got tired of Golden rod failures and used mothballs and dried rice and spray with alcolhol when I notice the green crap. However, my safe is mounted on slab in garage and slab is always damp in Florida.
 

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Interesting! The Golden Rods I'm using are units that I bought in the 1980's when I was an FFL business owner. I had a large stock of them and have used them since that time. Maybe a quality control issue? Made in China now?
 

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There's nothing special to a Golden Rod's humidity removal other than gentle warmth. In lieu of Golden Rods, a practical alternative is a heavy-duty 60-watt bulb to raise the air temperature in a safe about 1-2° above ambient temps. Who doesn't need a little light in a gun safe?
 

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I use Golden Rods that I had bought in quantity at dealer price when I had my gun business in the 1990's so the price was right. If had to buy a dehumidifier for my safes now I would probably go another route.

I have magnetic base LED lights in all my safes. I would like to have a hard wired system with a microswitch that turns them on when I open the safe door. Once I've got my earth home done and my safes installed I'll be using them more and will make some changes.
 
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