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Discussion Starter #1
I was looking at other bedding jobs in another thread, and mine seems lacking in some areas. I have these pics from about 8 months ago when I pulled the action to inspect/clean/lube. It has since been sitting in the safe (assembled of course). And when I shot it the other day, my zero was about 6" high, 3" right and the group at 100yds was about 5-6". I cant take anymore pics cause I am currently overseas, but I do have a few more that I didnt post. Can you fellas please inspect the pics and tell me if it seems lacking?









 

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Discussion Starter #2
Also just to add.

The action was EXTREMELY tight when removing. I nearly had to get a rubber mallet and beat on it.
 

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A Guru question..........

Also just to add.

The action was EXTREMELY tight when removing. I nearly had to get a rubber mallet and beat on it.
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To the Guru's reading this.......... What is the "proper" technique to remove a tightly bedded action? Where are the "pressure points" and the "NO Pressure points? Is it all straight force or is there some "tapping allowed"?

Hobo
 

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When you bed a M-14, the first time you take it out of the stock you HAVE to tap(beat) it out.

With rifle upside down tap on the inside of the receiver behind the safety bridge forward of the heel, in the area where the bolt rides.

To me the bedding job looks ok.

Bedded rifles sometimes take a few rounds to "settle in" and shoot as they should.

pg
USA2
 

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Discussion Starter #7
lol yes of course it was zero'd. I never had an issue with losing zero (until now). But that issue could be MANY things. Im not concerned about my zero now. I can always re-zero and if it loses again, begin troubleshooting. I was really concerned about the bedding job when I pulled the stock.
 

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Ouch! You did remove the scope first, right?

I don't see anything in the bedding job that flunks. Tight is good. Stable and repeatable = what you're after. There aren't any award points for neatness.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
This wasnt the first time I pull the action. It was the 3rd. And every time is was very hard. (Which is a good thing I would imagine.)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ouch! You did remove the scope first, right?

I don't see anything in the bedding job that flunks. Tight is good. Stable and repeatable = what you're after. There aren't any award points for neatness.
Didnt remove the scope. Why would I need too? (for future reference)
 

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bedding

The bedding looks fine, the picture of the clearance under the gas cyl. looks like more clearance is needed under the cyl.. Clear this area back past the end of the cyl..

Hope this helps,, Art
 

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This maybe an ignorant question but isn't one of the main reasons for having a rear lug is so the action can be bolted to the stock, that's not to say that your poor grouping is caused by not being bolted.
 

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Good question

The rear lug was "First" added by the Navy Teams, the purpose was to prevent rear receiver side to side movement, this was known as "Chucking" ..

The addition of the rear lug screw came sometime later, also by the Navy. This added screw did not prove out well in the accuracy dept. however.. Not until it was discovered that eliminating the trigger guard draw pressure was the rear lug screw successful. In my opinion, this rear screw no guard draw pressure makes the best possible combination for long life and excellent accuracy..

I can explain about the trigger draw pressure but it is long winded.. Art
 

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In my personal experience, anytime you take the action out of the stock for maintenance, it can take firing 10 to 20 rounds for the receiver to settle back into the bedding. Until then, groups can be larger and have a different POI.

If you had the gas cylinder plug removed, I would also make sure it was tightened to the same torque as before.

As long as you have good trigger guard draw pressure when you assembled the rifle, you should be good to go with the bedding.

Another consideration is something like a scope mount may have loosened up from shooting or handling.

When you assembled the rifle, did you put a dab of grease between the stock ferrule and barrel band?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Once I get back stateside, I will begin troubleshooting. (4 more weeks).

Here is another pic I took after I pulled the action the 1st time. I just remembered I lost zero that time as well. This is a typical group size for my M21. I am a MUCH better shot than this. For some reason my 1st and 2nd shots are always the flyers like in this pic, then the group (3) is always that tight. Why would the first 2 shots always do this?



And just for the sake of show, here is a pic of my baby with a swing-out nightvision monocle.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
In my personal experience, anytime you take the action out of the stock for maintenance, it can take firing 10 to 20 rounds for the receiver to settle back into the bedding. Until then, groups can be larger and have a different POI.

If you had the gas cylinder plug removed, I would also make sure it was tightened to the same torque as before.

As long as you have good trigger guard draw pressure when you assembled the rifle, you should be good to go with the bedding.

Another consideration is something like a scope mount may have loosened up from shooting or handling.

When you assembled the rifle, did you put a dab of grease between the stock ferrule and barrel band?
No, I didnt put any grease in that area. I remember having good draw pressure. Also, I didnt mess with the gas system at all. (Ever). The rifle only has about 300rds through it total.
 

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Don't miss this advise..

In my personal experience, anytime you take the action out of the stock for maintenance, it can take firing 10 to 20 rounds for the receiver to settle back into the bedding. Until then, groups can be larger and have a different POI.

If you had the gas cylinder plug removed, I would also make sure it was tightened to the same torque as before.

As long as you have good trigger guard draw pressure when you assembled the rifle, you should be good to go with the bedding.

Another consideration is something like a scope mount may have loosened up from shooting or handling.

When you assembled the rifle, did you put a dab of grease between the stock ferrule and barrel band?

Everybody should make a copy of the above... Art
 

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Shooting a mag or two through it, letting it sit and then trying again to establish a zero is what I had to do after taking mine apart. Could've bounced your optics around too, hopefully you took the mount off before hitting receiver with a hammer.
 
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