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Pictures, from “Back In The Day”

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Thought I’d start a new thread title. It’d be great to see some of the pictures all of you have taken over the years, and some from recent shipboard reunions/conventions/events, etc., if you have them.
So Post em’ if you Got em’!!!!

I’m starting it out with some pictures I posted over on http://www.worldnavalships.com/forums/

And hey add a “sea story” to the pictures also… I know you all have them, I sure do…

U.S.S. LEAHY (DLG-16) 21 Mar 70 - 05 Aug 71, homeported at D&S Piers, Norfolks, VA.

U.S.S. JOHN ADAMS (SSBN-620)G, 10 Jan 72 – 26 Jun 73, homeported at Pearl Harbor, HI, crews were swapped at Squadron 15, Apra Harbor, Guam.

U.S.S. PINTADO (SSN-672) Temp Duty (TAD, two weeks) Aug 75, homeported at Ballast Point, San Diego, CA


May You All Have Fair Winds and Following Seas….

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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
More Old Pictures...

Here are a few more pictures of the “NORA”, CA-26.

Port side view, with a Port 93 degree angle on the bow shot...



After 8”x55 main battery night firing off the port quarter. Portside after 5”x25 dual purpose anti-aircraft gun is in the foreground.



Can anyone here name this ferryboat, its history and maybe where this picture was taken???






“May You All Have Fair Winds and Following Seas”
 
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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
The Kackerlacka

I believe the ferry in the above photo is the MV KALAKALA which operated on Puget Sound from 1935 to 1967 and NO, I didn't serve on her either.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MV_Kalakala
Yes that would be correct; here story as posted at the above link is interesting. I rode aboard her once when I was seven years old, from Bremerton to Seattle. It was at night and raining hard. I remember very well how the water leaked in from the bottoms of those passenger deck access doors forward..

It was interesting to find out that her bridge and wheelhouse were built out of copper.... It was a chuckle to read what her moniker was....
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
The Debacle, 30 Nov-01Dec 1942

I meant to post the below link, when I first started adding these old pictures. Just a historical footnote to her loss, during a long forgotten night surface action, where the U.S. Navy “Thought” it was going to get the drop on the Tokyo Express.

U.S.S. NORTHAMPTON (CA-26)



Displacement 9,300 Tons, Dimensions, 600' 3" (oa) x 66' 1" x 23' (Max)
Armament 9 x 8"/55, 4 x 5"/25, 6 x 21"Torpedo tubes. 4 Aircraft
Machinery, 107,000 SHP; Geared Turbines, 4 screws Speed, 32.7 Knots,
Crew 621, Launched 05 SEP 1929, Commissioned 17 MAY 1930

Fate: Sunk by two torpedoes from the Japanese destroyer IJN OYASHIO
During the Battle of Tassafaronga off Guadalcanal on 01 DEC 1942

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Tassafaronga

The pictures at the above link speaks volumes as the effectiveness of the Japanese surface launched Type 93 "Long Lance" torpedo.

http://www.combinedfleet.com/torps.htm
 
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It sure looks like the camera caught the shell as it had just left the muzzle of the Truxtun's 5" gun. Look about four inches from the muzzle of the cannon and see if it doesn't look like the round was caught by the camera just as it exited the barrel. It may just be a reflection off the water but than again it sure looks like the 5" projectile.

7th
I think you're right, 7th. The camera EXIF info says 1/3200 of a second at f/8. Nikon D300s. Taken last year in the Arabian Gulf.
 

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The USS Mahnomen County (LST-912) foundered due to weather (rumor had it that it was a New Year's Eve party) on the rocks just off the shore of Chu Lai, Viet Nam on December 30, 1966. I happened to be hauling some defective radio equipment from the 3rd 8" Howitzer Battery down to FLSG-B in Chu Lai when I heard about the ship.

Being one of the nosey types, I went to 'observe' the salvage operation and discovered that my brother's ship, the USS Isle Royal was assisting in the salvage operation. I managed to talk a sailor (wish I knew his name) with a small boat into taking me out to the Isle Royal.

The Officer of the Deck refused boarding priviledges as I was fully armed with my M14 (my unit was located about 7 miles northwest of Chu Lai and I was on my own). The sailor (I owe him a bottle of 25 year old McCallan) offered to keep my weapon for me on his boat and I was then allowed to board the Isle Royal minus my M14 (I felt like I was walking naked down main street).

Instead of notifying my brother that I was aboard ship, they just left it up to me to find him. I asked enough people and finally learned he was working in a hanger atop the ship. I found my way up there and walked into the hanger and said hello. My brother turned around, saw me, and the expression on his face was priceless. I didn't have my camera (out of film) so my brothers expression will always be but a memory.
 

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Discussion Starter · #47 · (Edited)
A Great Read!!!!

The USS Mahnomen County (LST-912) foundered due to weather (rumor had it that it was a New Year's Eve party) on the rocks just off the shore of Chu Lai, Viet Nam on December 30, 1966. I went to 'observe' the salvage operation and discovered that my brother's ship, the USS Isle Royal was assisting in the salvage operation. I managed to talk a sailor (wish I knew his name) with a small boat into taking me out to the Isle Royal. I was fully armed with my M14 (my unit was located about 7 miles northwest of Chu Lai and I was on my own). The sailor (I owe him a bottle of 25 year old McCallan) offered to keep my weapon for me on his boat and I was then allowed to board the Isle Royal minus my M14 (I felt like I was walking naked down main street). I found my way up there and walked into the hanger and said hello. My brother turned around, saw me, and the expression on his face was priceless. I didn't have my camera (out of film) so my brothers expression will always be but a memory.
What a great story…. Love the part about the bottle of 25 year old McCallan… Again, that is an excellent story!!!! Thanks!!!

A PS,

4Quangs, do you remember what the rate or rank of the Officer of the Deck was who refused you permission to come aboard???
 

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Another modern-day shot of the USS Truxtun on a speed run (with one engine down).

That is one gorgeous picture of a beautiful warship.

It brings back memories of Destroyers breaking away from us after an underway ammo replenishment in the Nam. They'd be steaming along beside the Rainier's starboard side, about 75' away and once all lines were clear... The smoke would suddenly begin boiling out of their stacks, their twin screws would dig into the water and off they'd go at high speed.

7th
 

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USS KIDD (DDG-993) - Norfolk, VA

I was the ASWO from early 84 to the end of 85. She was one of the four "Ayatollah" class DDGs that we built for the Shah of Iran but thankfully never delivered. She was basically a Virginia-class CGN on a Spruance-class hull. Fast, powerful, and loads of fun to drive.

The first pic is taken from a carrier during underway replenishment in high seas. The little red things on the forecastle are phone & distance line handlers.

The second was taken from the pilothouse while we skirted a hurricane near Onslow Bay in Oct 84. Yes, the 5"/54 mount is turned backwards.

The third....well it's just a publicity photo.
 

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Yes that would be correct; here story as posted at the above link is interesting. I rode aboard her once when I was seven years old, from Bremerton to Seattle. It was at night and raining hard. I remember very well how the water leaked in from the bottoms of those passenger deck access doors forward..

It was interesting to find out that her bridge and wheelhouse were built out of copper.... It was a chuckle to read what her moniker was....
Here's an update on the ferry Kalakala.....

http://www.kitsapsun.com/news/2012/jul/24/kalakala-moved-to-better-mooring-in-tacoma/
 
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Discussion Starter · #56 · (Edited)
70 Years ago on 15Sep1942, Farragut NTS is commissioned

The 15th of this month, (nine days ago) is the 70th anniversary of the commissioning of what was the second largest Naval Training Center in the world in WWII. Known then and today, as Farragut Naval Training Station (in commission from 15Sep1942 till 15June1946).

Many people, to include my fellow Navy Veteran’s have never heard of Farragut NTS, Now preserved as Farragut State Park in the panhandle of northern Idaho.

My Father as represented by my avatar arrived at Farragut in Jan of 44 and turned 37 while training there. I had the pleasure and honor of attending this past September 8th, the 26th Annual Farragut Reunion. I have included a few pictures below of that event. The opening ceremony was possibly the single most emotionally “heavy” Veteran’s related event I have ever attended, very much on par or actually exceeding the feelings I always get when stepping aboard the U.S.S. ARIZONA (BB-39) at Pearl Harbor.
From 17Sep42 till the last class of “Boots”, who graduated on 10Mar45, 293,381 recruits from at least 23 states trained there in five totally separate and complete Navy basic training camps.

Here is links where you can learn a little more about Farragut Naval Training Station.

http://museum.mil.idaho.gov/farragut.html

Here below are a few pictures from back on the 8th of this month… I have a few more if anyone here wants to see them? The pictures I took do little justice to the personal enormity of the whole event I must tell you..
Attendees getting settled in prior to 0900, The ceremony is held in the area in front of the Farragut NTS, brig, the only remaining structure from WWII, now it is a museum.

A sculptural bust honoring all who trained at Farragut in WWII.

Robert A., who went on to serve aboard the YMS-387 and PC 811 and eventually became a SoM3/c. Robert Graduated from Camp Waldron, as a member of Co. 711-43, Sept-Nov of 1943. Robert sang all four verses of “Eternal Father Strong to Save”, a cappella. He never faltered or wavered and there was not a dry eye among all those who attended, I’m sure of it. As I said earlier, “possibly the single most emotionally “heavy” Veteran’s related event I have ever attended”


God Bless all those Great Men who served in WWII. We owe them all so very, very much.
 
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