M14 Forum banner
1 - 20 of 47 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Many of you probably saw the thread started a few weeks ago by Jrr051468 on his "Old M1A" discovery thread. Many of you have chimed in. I've got a few pictures to share since it arrived at my FFL today and I'd like to know what else you might be able to help me know about this particular rifle. Jrr051468 got us started off great with the backstory on the rifle (reposted below, thank you sir!) but I'd like to know whatever ELSE there is to know about it.

I'm more than willing to satisfy anyone's curiosities here if you want me to dig into the rifle looking for particular roll marks, electropencil marks, or what have you. Just tell me where to look and I'll get some pictures. This is my first M1A, and I'm pleased with it in my cursory check. I'm just looking for some more info, and some suggestions on two things:

1.) Scope mount (can you tell me what I have, or better yet, if it needs to be replaced)
2.) Scope. I'm not really what I'd call a "scope guy" so I'm looking for suggestions. Range is probably never going to be over 500 yards, and realistically will probably not ever be over 300yds. I do not hunt (yet, so far), if that makes a difference in scope choice

Now, here's that backstory:

Back in Oct., I was looking through my gun pages one day. I had one M1a and was looking for another when a gun ad caught my eye. It simply stated “Springfield rifle for sale” and gave a number. For some reason, it caught my eye but I hem-hawed around for a couple of days with it nagging at me before I decided to call figuring it was going to be an old trapdoor or an ‘03. So I called… To my surprise, an older lady answered the phone. She didn’t know much about what she was selling so after a lot of “does it have this” questions, I finally realized it was a M1a. I asked her where it came from and she told me this story…

It turns out that her deceased husband was a SSgt in the Marines. He had been in for 22 years when he decided to retire in ‘84 (she thought). One of the things he had always wanted to do as they moved around was to shoot in service matches. He got to figuring that when he retired, he could shoot in them, so he went to an USMC armorer buddy that he knew well and worked out some deal so that the armorer would get him a rifle and tune it up for him. She says she remembered when we brought it home, they were in North Carolina at the time, and how proud of it he was… She remembered him sitting in the floor “shooting it with no bullets in it” in “all kinds of funny ways”. (I’m sure he was practicing positions and trigger control.) She says he shot a few times in NC before he got sick. He passed away less than 3 yrs after getting out in ‘87. She packed it up with everything else and moved back home to AL. Well, it stayed under the bed for the last 25 years. She had actually forgot about it being there until she started cleaning out the house and found it. Lucky for me, she decided to sell it.

I was the only one that called. We hit it off ok on the phone and I met her a few days later. She had me get it out of her car where it was wrapped in a blanket. I unrolled the blanket and really couldn’t believe my eyes. It WAS an M1a and a NM to boot! It even had a scope and mount on it and it looked great. I can just see this old Marine sitting and polishing this stock, babying it, and loving it. I handled as she and I talked for a while, and before long, she told me what she wanted for it. It was ridiculously low so I told her what I thought it was worth and ended up giving her quite a bit more than she wanted. We both left happy.


Ok, so I get it home. I started looking it over and realized how low the serial no. was. The more I looked, the more I felt this old marine… I tried the trigger and that’s when the old armorer jumped up. The trigger is about 4 lbs and super crisp. I started to take it down and saw that it was glass bedded. (I recently eased it out and looked it all over. You can see where a little wood was removed by hand before bedding and there are little marks of a chisel in several places where the wood was relieved by hand.) Mechanically, it basically looked unfired. I guess that’s to be expected from a Marines rifle though… I reassembled it, ran a bore snake through it and took a mag of ball out and shot it at 50 and 100 yds. 10 at 50 went into a large ragged hole and the 10 at a 100 was about 2 inches. With PMC ball… I took it back and wiped it down and put it in the safe. Rather pleased, I might add…

Well, as I have looked around the m14 site, I have come to realize what a rare rifle it is and I want something I can beat up and drag through mud hog hunting etc… This rifle deserves better…
I'm looking forward to anything new you might be able to add, or any suggestions or requests for more info that may come. I'm hoping to give it a good cleaning and pick up some 168gr. match ammo this week to take out this weekend. Here's the pictures:










 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,509 Posts
Hey 40cal, your rifle was built sometime between the middle of 1975 and the middle of 1976 , not very long after production started in Illinois. It was probably called simply a "Match model" at the time it was sold. the NM's came out a little later {I don't know if there was any difference other than the name] Call SAI's customer service they can usually give you the exact date the rifle left the factory and the model. As for a scope mount an ARMS or a Bassett , for scopes check our the Zeiss Conquest line. I'm glad I ragged on Jrr51468 to publish the story and that a person who would give this rifle a good home got it. Take good care of her you have a very "rare bird". May I say Congratulations.............. PS your scope mount is one of the early scope mounts sold by SAI
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,352 Posts
Nice rifle, but buy a REAL scope mount. Throw that one in the trash. Purchase a three point mount like a ARMS, Sadlak or SEI.
They hold zero and won't shoot loose
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,509 Posts
Don't throw the old mount away, it's period correct for the rifle, just set it aside in your safe. At the time it was made It WAS "the real scope mount". If I was in the market right now I'd buy a Bassett. Less hassle and on and off without POI changes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
You do realize that you have violated the #1 rule of gun trading. Never, ever, give a widow a break on the price of a used firearm. Unless you graduated from basic with her husband, and served multiple combat tours with him, you should beat her down on the sale price. Do everything you can to convince her that the rifle is nearly worthless. Tell her how difficult is is to locate a reputable buyer like you. Suggest that she will be safer and happier with no gun in the house. Intimate to her that it would be an honor to place her deceased husband's weapon next to yours in the rack. If this concept repels you, then consider that she ragged her husband for purchasing the rifle, as well as the time he spent playing with it. Don't forget to offer to take any leftover ammo or accessories, not to mention spare parts or guns, "Just to get them out of your way". When she offers a price, wince, and tell her that the rifle is just not that valuable. Offer her what you want to pay, and suggest that if that is not enough, then she can just hang it on the wall to remember him by. Although you may find this somewhat distasteful, it is a time honored tradition. If you violate this rule, you leave yourself open to paying too much for a rifle that was left in her possession by a former boyfriend. If she offers food or drink, or suggests another meeting, proceed at your own risk. She may be selling your stuff someday. Just my experience. Regards, Clark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,921 Posts
Very nice! It's probably loaded with GI parts. I would just clean it up, grease it and shoot it.

You say you're not a scope guy, so just use the iron sights and keep the scope and mount. The Pentax should be a decent scope. I'm with Ray on the Bassett mount for easy on/off.

If you want to take it out of the stock (shouldn't take it out more than needed, but I probably wouldn't be able to resist if it was new to me), clean it up real good, take a bunch of pics, especially of any markings, and share some with us. We'll look forward to more pics and a range report.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ray55classic

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,509 Posts
You do realize that you have violated the #1 rule of gun trading. Never, ever, give a widow a break on the price of a used firearm. Unless you graduated from basic with her husband, and served multiple combat tours with him, you should beat her down on the sale price. Do everything you can to convince her that the rifle is nearly worthless. Tell her how difficult is is to locate a reputable buyer like you. Suggest that she will be safer and happier with no gun in the house. Intimate to her that it would be an honor to place her deceased husband's weapon next to yours in the rack. If this concept repels you, then consider that she ragged her husband for purchasing the rifle, as well as the time he spent playing with it. Don't forget to offer to take any leftover ammo or accessories, not to mention spare parts or guns, "Just to get them out of your way". When she offers a price, wince, and tell her that the rifle is just not that valuable. Offer her what you want to pay, and suggest that if that is not enough, then she can just hang it on the wall to remember him by. Although you may find this somewhat distasteful, it is a time honored tradition. If you violate this rule, you leave yourself open to paying too much for a rifle that was left in her possession by a former boyfriend. If she offers food or drink, or suggests another meeting, proceed at your own risk. She may be selling your stuff someday. Just my experience. Regards, Clark
I guess being Chicken S#@& is a time honored tradition after all. The way a man conducts himself among the weak shows what kind of character a man truly has. What goes around comes around
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
You do realize that you have violated the #1 rule of gun trading. Never, ever, give a widow a break on the price of a used firearm. Unless you graduated from basic with her husband, and served multiple combat tours with him, you should beat her down on the sale price. Do everything you can to convince her that the rifle is nearly worthless. Tell her how difficult is is to locate a reputable buyer like you. Suggest that she will be safer and happier with no gun in the house. Intimate to her that it would be an honor to place her deceased husband's weapon next to yours in the rack. If this concept repels you, then consider that she ragged her husband for purchasing the rifle, as well as the time he spent playing with it. Don't forget to offer to take any leftover ammo or accessories, not to mention spare parts or guns, "Just to get them out of your way". When she offers a price, wince, and tell her that the rifle is just not that valuable. Offer her what you want to pay, and suggest that if that is not enough, then she can just hang it on the wall to remember him by. Although you may find this somewhat distasteful, it is a time honored tradition. If you violate this rule, you leave yourself open to paying too much for a rifle that was left in her possession by a former boyfriend. If she offers food or drink, or suggests another meeting, proceed at your own risk. She may be selling your stuff someday. Just my experience. Regards, Clark
I going to purposely not respond to you because I have absolutely nothing nice to say at all. You're more than welcome to peddle your garbage logic elsewhere.

Very nice! It's probably loaded with GI parts. I would just clean it up, grease it and shoot it.

You say you're not a scope guy, so just use the iron sights and keep the scope and mount. The Pentax should be a decent scope. I'm with Ray on the Bassett mount for easy on/off.

If you want to take it out of the stock (shouldn't take it out more than needed, but I probably wouldn't be able to resist if it was new to me), clean it up real good, take a bunch of pics, especially of any markings, and share some with us. We'll look forward to more pics and a range report.
I have no doubt that's exactly where I'm headed. One good detail cleaning of all parts every... probably dozen or so years (removing from the stock). Otherwise it'll be a regular cleaning (thorough, though) but not removing it from the stock. I'll be sure to get some pics. I'll probably do this Wednesday or Thursday. As for the scope, it's not likely that I'll be able to shoot too far out without a scope. My eyesight, especially in my right eye, seems to be starting to get fuzzy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Just called Springfield Armory. They don't have the information in their electronic records. They are pulling their bound books for hand written entries to get me further details. They will email me the details as soon as they have them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,966 Posts
That's pretty cool. As far as mounts go a basset low picatinny mount is what I'd probably get, or maybe arms split rail if you can find one. Scope is all up to you, anything made in USA/Japan/Germany with 80 MOA or 22mils of internal adjustment should work fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,528 Posts
Nice rifle. Whats with the slots in the flash hider? Either a butt load of rounds or somebody messed with it. I might replace that and thats it. Enjoy!!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,174 Posts
Strip it down and give it a detailed cleaning your not going too hurt it and who knows when the last time it was done, just be careful when you put it back together. this would be the time too record any part numbers and we could give you a better brake down who made what. Snap a few pic's while your at it......

The front sight is NM, but the rear should have a NM/2 or NM/2a base with the hood.

Is the flash hider reamed?

The stock isn't SA because of the non sarifed P, are there any numbers under the butt-plate stamped into the wood? the odd duck stamp in the pistol grip has been seen in many WWII era Remington 03a3 rifles, so I find it odd too see it on a M14 stock. At present know one has found out what it means either........
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,777 Posts
Sealark, I hope you were just screwing around and not being serious with that statement. No widow should be taken advantage of like that unless she's a democrat. That banter is all too common these days and there are dirt bags who do just that. They are part of the problem and should learn how to mind their manners. If you are not kidding, then I will absolutely not deal with you in the for sale section for it will always be in my mind that you did just that to some widow.
Op: thank you for posting this story and even better for the guy you bought it from for being respectful and fair. It's a beautiful rifle and deserves to be shot and we'll cared for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,509 Posts
A reamed flashhider is just that. In short it's been reamed to a predetermined inside diameter to eliminate one more variable as the bullet passes out the barrel . Since it's your first M1A refresh yourself on takedown', lubrication, and reassembly with tonybens videos right before you tear her down and don't spare the grease, put enough on it. The flashhider does appear to be reamed from the photo. .Although it's been a number of years since I bought my first M1A, I do remember the first time I shot one. It was at least a week, maybe ten days before I quit smiling. keep us informed and Enjoy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
i did get through the first of tonybens videos and about half way through the second last night. i intend to watch them a few times before major dissection begins.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
You do realize that you have violated the #1 rule of gun trading. Never, ever, give a widow a break on the price of a used firearm. Unless you graduated from basic with her husband, and served multiple combat tours with him, you should beat her down on the sale price. Do everything you can to convince her that the rifle is nearly worthless. Tell her how difficult is is to locate a reputable buyer like you. Suggest that she will be safer and happier with no gun in the house. Intimate to her that it would be an honor to place her deceased husband's weapon next to yours in the rack. If this concept repels you, then consider that she ragged her husband for purchasing the rifle, as well as the time he spent playing with it. Don't forget to offer to take any leftover ammo or accessories, not to mention spare parts or guns, "Just to get them out of your way". When she offers a price, wince, and tell her that the rifle is just not that valuable. Offer her what you want to pay, and suggest that if that is not enough, then she can just hang it on the wall to remember him by. Although you may find this somewhat distasteful, it is a time honored tradition. If you violate this rule, you leave yourself open to paying too much for a rifle that was left in her possession by a former boyfriend. If she offers food or drink, or suggests another meeting, proceed at your own risk. She may be selling your stuff someday. Just my experience. Regards, Clark
That's one of the lowest things I have ever heard said by a man... You sir, have no honor, and have made that plain to all present. Consider yourself to have just recieved a proverbial glove across the face and know that I will await your presence at dawn on the dueling grounds... no seconds allowed... Jerk...
 
1 - 20 of 47 Posts
Top