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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found two wooden crates at a army surplus warehouse both boxes had the vice,wrench,torque wrench and paperwork to go along with them. I was wondering if this is rare i can seem to find much on the web,
Thanks for your time









 

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Nice!

What are the stamped markings on the base of the vise?

And welcome to the forum! FRG1
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
It says that the barrel and receiver needs to withstand at least 80lb if torque in the direction of disassembly. And i'm sorry if i was not more clear in my first post, this is a Springfield (I think it is made by Springfield) m14 barrel vice. The NSN is 5220009169196
 

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It was not made by Springfield, if it is marked with an NSN. The NSN you show did not exist in 1968 when SA closed. What are the markings and dates on the forms?

I may be able to give you information based upon the information on the forms.

I have about five of the wrenches for the Garand, buried somewhere.

The vice is dis-assembly only, not assembly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The date of the drawing revision is JAN 14 62. The form was printed in July 65. The bar that says date on it is 2-14-90. The Gage number Drawing is( F-7271792(A). The box that says Function , ( Barrel & Receiver Assy...7790191, Tightness of Draw.) The box that says component name is (Rifle.7.62 MM, M14)
I guess after looking around today it is probably just a vice to hold the barrel while someone torques on the receiver to make sure it is tight enough. Hopefully they can be put to good use.

It was not made by Springfield, if it is marked with an NSN. The NSN you show did not exist in 1968 when SA closed. What are the markings and dates on the forms?

I may be able to give you information based upon the information on the forms.

I have about five of the wrenches for the Garand, buried somewhere.

The vice is dis-assembly only, not assembly.
 

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It is for torque testing not for assembly:

STEEL;5 IN.W.;BARREL & RECEIVER MUST WITHSTAND 80 FT.LBS.APPLY FORCE IN THE DIRECTION NECESSARY TO DISASSEMBLE

There was a very large device, weighted about 80-100 lbs, for the M14 to assemble the barrel onto the receiver. It was used at the depot level for maintenance. The same type of device existed for the M1, but slightly different in adjustments.

Its is: Gage, Torque Testing.
 

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Torque Gage

While Depot level gages are not common, it probably has more to do with a lack of necessity among armorers for this particular tool. Many M14 tools were sold for scrap and given or sold to other countries by our government. This is a good find however.

Use of the Torque Gage 7271792 is illustrated in the USAWC Depot Maintenance Work Requirements for Overhaul of the Rifle, 7.62MM, M14 and Bipos, Rifle, M2.

The 80 pound torque requirement is a minimum at which the receiver shall not unscrew from the barrel. It's interesting that there are no maximum torque limits specified in the manual, but it should be noted that excessive torque can constrict chamber tolerances and effect accuracy. Some armorers limit final torque in NM rifles to 55 pounds to insure this doesn't happen.
 

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Torque Gages

I'm happy to report that I am now in possession of these fine tools. I'll include one of them in my working collection of depot level gages. It was interesting that these were in unused condition allthough they did have some minor surface oxidation in places from all the years of storage. Overall they are in excellent codition. The DRMO paperwork indicated these tools cost the government $1330 each. They were last inspected in 1990 and the calibration and inspection certificates were included. A great find to be sure.
 
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