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I got this far with just a rubber mallet and a punch:
View attachment 47590

It's nice to have a dad who works at a machine shop. He made this for me today:
View attachment 47591

And here is the end result.
View attachment 47592
I used a regular hammer which seemed to work much faster, but still required a fair amount of elbow grease. If anyone has a better idea as to how to attach these oprod guides, I'm all ears. I don't plan on doing another one anytime soon.

Vino
 

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A rubber mallet and a punch are not a good combination. What you want is a means of transferring the inertia of a ballpeen or similar hammer to the OP rod without damaging it or the barrel. A small piece of brass, aluminum or other soft metal works well. You have to move around the guide to keep it moving straight. The main problem with these things is the variation in fit and the inability of most do-it-yourselfers to measure it. A small amount of interference is most desirable. Some barrels are knurled in this area because of a loose fit. Some people like them to be locktighted in place.
 

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Nice work Tony! Great video!
Going out on a limb here. When I install OP rod guide I pay more attention to how the OP rod aligns to the receiver than to the gas cyl. This goes against conventional thinking by the old guard experts, but I always have marched a bit out of step. If you have ever seen an OP rod that is hard to remove from its track it might make you think twice. While I would not want the end of the gas piston grossly out of line with the end of the OP rod I think the larger diameter of the OP rod was to allow for a slight alignment issue here.
Think about the direction of force the bolt puts on the OP rod during cycling. All the clearance will be pushed to this side as the OP rod moves down the track. Look at the gap between the receiver and the OP rod. I like to see a straight line in that gap, when the op rod is all the way back. Rotating the guide changes this dramatically. The pin is pretty much useless except on heavy profile barrels where you drill the hole in the guide and the barrel after all the alignment is done. The holes are not pre drilled other than a center drill marker.
You have demonstrated a high level of skill and a developed feel here for not knurling too much without doing any measuring. Easy tap fit is exactly what you want. Nice work.

Just ideas, Thinking out loud. Not set in concrete, or proven with tons of target practice.
 

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79 IHC Scout II, 74 VW Bug class 11 look a like
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I set one on a hot plate with a piece of 1/4" aluminum on it to heat it, it dropped in place and once it cooled it was tight, it did not even need the pin.
This is also how I put the gears on the snout of a VW crankshaft.

Casey
 
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