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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Are op rod shock buffers worth keeping? I had just gotten this used Fulton barreled upper and it came with one. Do they just cause more problems like 1911 buffers?
 

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Some guy who wanted to sell something cheap and easy to make a buck.
Story I heard is some pretty low tier 1911’s back in the 70’s and 80’s had issues of the frame cracking in the frontal trigger guard area. The buffer was to “prevent” that. Eventually they started getting sold off as recoil reducers and the such. They do nothing but break apart. the cheapness of manufacturing them and the marketing spread them to other systems. I remember for a short time there was a plastic donut shaped buffer for the AR system even.
 

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Going against the crowd, I do occasionally use buffers in 1911s. It generally stops the ringing of the slide on the frame, which I appreciate. I haven't really messed around with anything like that for the M14, but that gun rings a good bit too. I suspect it's coming from the guide rod though rather than the receiver I'll probably plat around with some delrin at some point.
 

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Going against the crowd, I do occasionally use buffers in 1911s. It generally stops the ringing of the slide on the frame, which I appreciate. I haven't really messed around with anything like that for the M14, but that gun rings a good bit too. I suspect it's coming from the guide rod though rather than the receiver I'll probably plat around with some delrin at some point.
It’s the flash hider ringing. A soft tap to the muzzle device with a screw driver will indicate that. Also took my flash hider off once when I had an optic mounted to see if there was an POI or accuracy change once out of curiosity and had no affect in those departments but the ring went away.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
It’s the flash hider ringing. A soft tap to the muzzle device with a screw driver will indicate that. Also took my flash hider off once when I had an optic mounted to see if there was an POI or accuracy change once out of curiosity and had no affect in those departments but the ring went away.
Does the ringing change with a NM flashhider?
 

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Does the ringing change with a NM flashhider?
I’d assume a slight difference. Both of mine have been National Match one with and one without the Bayonet lug. Slightly brighter ring on the one with the lug but it also fit more snug on the muzzle.
That’s one of the easy ways to test Flash hider fitment is how it rings. Same with Sighting ribs on shotguns, a soft tap it should ring. If it’s a dull thud then your flash hider or the rib if on a Shotgun isn’t securely attached.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I’d assume a slight difference. Both of mine have been National Match one with and one without the Bayonet lug. Slightly brighter ring on the one with the lug but it also fit more snug on the muzzle.
That’s one of the easy ways to test Flash hider fitment is how it rings. Same with Sighting ribs on shotguns, a soft tap it should ring. If it’s a dull thud then your flash hider or the rib if on a Shotgun isn’t securely attached.
Cool. Good to know
 

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I have a Fulton Peerless in a Mac stock. The rifle shoots under an inch at 100 yds with Port Ball. I have shot 1/2 inch groups with my hand rolled ammo and one lucky day I placed 10 rounds into 11 inches at 1000 yds. That's what the rifle is able to produce with me having a good day. I took it out a month ago and was rechecking zero. I noticed I was not able to hold zero and had a flyer with every attempt to group. I usually don't blame the equipment, so I had to take a look at myself. I realized I hadn't shot in a while so it had to be me. I packed it up and called it a day day since I just couldn't group. I went home and decided I hadn't cleaned the rifle or lubed it up in a bit, I have never taken it out of the stock either. I started to take it apart and I noticed something wrapped around the recoil spring. I came to realize that there was a shock buffer put in there from the original build. Never taken the rifle apart before I never knew it was there. Once I took the rifle completely apart and cleaned it lubed it and put it back together. The only thing that was left was this. As was stated before if John Garand or John Browning (notice the first names seem to be the same, Hum) thought a shock buffer was needed they would have added it to the design.
Wood Grey Beige Circle Fashion accessory
 

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Who came up with these things?
Marketing depts.
Noted firearms instructor John Farnam once said, in a class I attended on the subject of 1911 shock buffers "those things are made for idiots, and trust me, they are selling thousands of them..."
This was right after we were performing remedial action drills (double feed clearance) and one student couldn't lock the slide open on his 1911. John took a look, removed the slide and took the shock buffer out.
Conversation went something like this: John "why do you have that in your gun?" Student: "to protect the slide from damage" John: "if your gun will be damaged from shooting it, you need to find a better gun"
 
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