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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So while running errands this afternoon I stopped by the local MC sports in town to see what ammo I might find. While looking, I just happened to notice in the upper corner a military riffle. I did a little poking around and found it to be a pretty nice looking mosin nagant.
Now, I don't know a lot about the mosin's yet but I looked it over and decided to roll the dice on it.
It looks very clean and all the serial numbers that I can find match. It also came with a bayonet, sling, cleaning kit and cool little double "canteen".
I would love to hear thoughts from you guys on it.
Pics will come in a few mins.
Having a little trouble with the pics. Stand by please
 

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I had a 1944 Mosin Nagant Carbine once. Great Shooter.
My Brother in law got a Nice Rifle sized one for $120.00.
Cheap Ammo is in your future !
Have fun!
 
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.....It looks very clean and all the serial numbers that I can find match. It also came with a bayonet, sling, cleaning kit and cool little double "canteen".
I would love to hear thoughts from you guys on it.
http://7.62x54r.net/MosinID/MosinM9130S.htm

www.mosinnagant.com/USSR/Russian/-M44-Carbine.asp


Look carefully at all the 'serial numbers'. many of the originals will have a strike-through and a second number stamped, which will match all the other numbers. Most Mosins coming into the US have been assembled from the best parts of many old rifles, and the serial number on the barrel will be used as the number to stamp on all the other parts.

Two armories made the M-N, Tula and Izhevsk. The Tula mark is a star with an arrow in the middle, pointing up, and Izhevsk is a triangle with an arrow. You'll also see two types of receivers, one is the "hex" receiver that has squared edges, and the round top. Hex receivers were made up to about 1934 or so.

Before firing the rifle, ensure the firing pin depth is set correctly. The teardrop-shaped screwdriver, with the big hole and notches down one side, that came in the cleaning kit (or should have) is used to do this, the notches on the side are used to gauge a pin that is too deep or too shallow, one of the websites tells you how to do this, and there are plenty of youtube videos out there. Completely disassemble the rifle and get all the cosmoline out of the barrel, action and stock. Have you figured out the safety on it yet?

Mosins are nice, old rifles with a lot of history behind them. Can you believe that they were actually a US service rifle for a short period of time?
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
http://7.62x54r.net/MosinID/MosinM9130S.htm

www.mosinnagant.com/USSR/Russian/-M44-Carbine.asp


Look carefully at all the 'serial numbers'. many of the originals will have a strike-through and a second number stamped, which will match all the other numbers. Most Mosins coming into the US have been assembled from the best parts of many old rifles, and the serial number on the barrel will be used as the number to stamp on all the other parts.

Two armories made the M-N, Tula and Izhevsk. The Tula mark is a star with an arrow in the middle, pointing up, and Izhevsk is a triangle with an arrow. You'll also see two types of receivers, one is the "hex" receiver that has squared edges, and the round top. Hex receivers were made up to about 1934 or so.

Before firing the rifle, ensure the firing pin depth is set correctly. The teardrop-shaped screwdriver, with the big hole and notches down one side, that came in the cleaning kit (or should have) is used to do this, the notches on the side are used to gauge a pin that is too deep or too shallow, one of the websites tells you how to do this, and there are plenty of youtube videos out there. Completely disassemble the rifle and get all the cosmoline out of the barrel, action and stock.

Mosins are nice, old rifles with a lot of history behind them. Can you believe that they were actually a US service rifle for a short period of time?
Lots of good info in there. where would the "strike through" numbers be? I see one on the butt plate but it appears to be a mistake with spacing the first time. ???
 

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That looks like a nice clean "Winter War" Tula arsenal with a post ww2 rebuild. If the bore is in good shape it should shoot great. Has the muzzle been counter bored? I read somewhere that it took about 40 hours to make one rifle prior to ww2, but during the war by cutting corners they got that time down to something like 11 hours per rifle. GI3
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm not sure if there are any important pics I'm missing. If there are, and you want to see let me know. Like I said, I know very little about these. I mostly bought it because my buddy has one he plays with and it looked fun.
Thanks for the extra info that you guys have already provided. It still amazes me the depth of your knowledge.



Oh, one last thing I almost forgot. it was $79.99 :)
 

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Lots of good info in there. where would the "strike through" numbers be? I see one on the butt plate but it appears to be a mistake with spacing the first time. ???
Anywhere there is a serial number, but usually not the barrel, since the new numbers will match the receiver/barrel number. Bottom of the magazine trap door is one place, but yours is original. The bolt can have a struck-through number, with a new one stamped that matches the receiver. I have a 1932 Tula, but the bolt has an Ishevsk armory mark, and the SN's match, because the bolt has been renumbered.

Here's what a strike through can look like, this is my rifle below. It looks like the butt plate on your rifle has a strike-through.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Anywhere there is a serial number, but usually not the barrel, since the new numbers will match the receiver/barrel number. Bottom of the magazine trap door is one place, but yours is original. The bolt can have a struck-through number, with a new one stamped that matches the receiver. I have a 1932 Tula, but the bolt has an Ishevsk armory mark, and the SN's match, because the bolt has been renumbered.

Here's what a strike through can look like, this is my rifle below. It looks like the butt plate on your rifle has a strike-through.
very interesting. I don't see any strike troughs on the rifle except the butt plate. The odd thing to me is that it's almost the same number. The stuck number spacing is such as to make me think the stamper guy was about to inverse the correct 5756 to an accidental 5657...
 
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I have a 1944 Izhevsk M44 and I love her...rough machining, sticky bolt, and all!
 

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I found this bit of satire soon after buying my own Mosin Nagant and thought you all might enjoy it.

http://7.62x54r.net/MosinID/MosinHumor.htm

Mine is an unissued ww2 surplus one stamped 1943 and I love it. Have never had it at the range so not sure of group sizes but can consistently hit beer bottles at 100m. I got a decent hind at about 200m first round (the one in the picture) and my GF has hits goats with it on more than one occasion at over 150m (it became her rifle after I got my M305).

I thought about scoping it but it does everything I ask of it with the iron sights. It took a little figuring out as far as POA goes and I had to apply pliers to the front sight to get it in the right place. But who cares, it works now, was simple. Plus its so user friendly and it likes to take a hiding. I have fired a lot of rifles and MGs and this one is in my top five for enjoyability.
 
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