M14 Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i just installed a sadlak nm spring guide and seems like it is rubing can feel when cycling by hand and is noisy. is this normal ?does it need break in?feels notchy. please help!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,243 Posts
I think we have heard of this before on newer SAI OP rods. You may have to polish the bore of the OP rod where the spring goes. Wooden dowel with a slot and some emory cloth in the slot, spinning with hand drill or some variation thereof.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
637 Posts
Memphis is correct, you need to polish the inside of your op rod. I had the exact same problem when I installed the Sadlak guide. Remove the op rod from the rifle and degrease the inside of it. I used brake cleaner and a cleaning rod with a patch. Let it dry. Then use a fine grit sandpaper around a dowel to lightly sand the interior of the op rod moving to emery cloth to polish it up. Inspect with a bright flashlight as you go & don't over do it, just smooth it out. You have a metal burr or a rough patch in there somewhere and the tighter tolerances of the Sadlak guide are causing them to rub the spring. After sanding clean it out again and grease it up. When I did this little operation my action is smooth as silk. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The first thing i tried was to grease it. It was still noisy and could feel spring rubbing the tube.should i use the polish method on the entire length of the tube or just where the spring enters? I thank you guys the feed back.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,325 Posts
As mentioned, a close inspection with a bright light should show you where it needs it most, polishing that is. The very front end is already a little bit compressed, so it most likely is from halfway the length of the op rod, to the opening that is rubbing a burr in there....mine sounds like a zipper. I just grease it up and shoot the burrs out. DI5
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,006 Posts
Yes the larger size OD of any brand NM Op rod spring guide will tighten up the tolerances between the op rod spring and the ID of op rod. The USGI op rod guide allows the spring to bunch around it with out interfering the ID of the op rod. This is probably more true if you use an aftermarket spring such as the extra power Tubbs. The solution is to polish, notice I didn't say grind, the ID of the op rod as suggested above. It wouldn't hurt either if you inspected the NM op rod guide for any bright spots that the spring is rubbing against. I've polished these "high" spots down with 400 grit sandpaper and reblued. During any take down, I look look to see if the blueing is worn off. If so I'll sand/polish a little more off, and reblue. I had a 1991 Bush rifle that made more noise than my neighbors dog, when pulling back on the op rod handle. Doing the above cured it. It's just a matter of getting these mating parts to work smoothly together. dozier
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
My 16 sounded like a old screen door and felt like I was pulling the bolt over a washboard when I got it. I replaced the guide with a Sadlak, the spring with a wolff, greased it up and ran a hundred or so through it. It sounds and feels better now.. Ron
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,006 Posts
My 16 sounded like a old screen door and felt like I was pulling the bolt over a washboard when I got it. I replaced the guide with a Sadlak, the spring with a wolff, greased it up and ran a hundred or so through it. It sounds and feels better now.. Ron

Ron, while that would work because you are letting the parts wear in together, the metal rubbing together will cause flat spots in the op rod spring. dozier
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
145 Posts
Ron, while that would work because you are letting the parts wear in together, the metal rubbing together will cause flat spots in the op rod spring. dozier
I need to take it to my smith and let him check it over. I hadn't been introduced to him when I got the SOCOM and since then we always have 1911's to discuss/address with his limited time. Perhaps I'll take Thumper down and polish it a-bit.

I've been holding out for good wood before having it professionally gone over. Thanks.. Ron

PS: It still sounds like a cross between your/my/etc. mothers voice and Madonna when it runs.. LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,006 Posts
i need to take it to my smith and let him check it over. I hadn't been introduced to him when i got the socom and since then we always have 1911's to discuss/address with his limited time. perhaps i'll take thumper down and polish it a-bit.

i've been holding out for good wood before having it professionally gone over. Thanks.. Ron

yes, this is not a hard diy project. Just look at the inside of the op rod to see if you have any high spots , or grooves cut when they machined the part. Get a wood dowel/400 grit sand paper from a auto parts store; and have at the id of the op rod. Same sandpaper for the shiney spots on the op rod guide. Or if it's cheap enough, let your gs do the work. I personally diy, as some gss will not put forth the effort, as you would your own "baby".


ps: It still sounds like a cross between your/my/etc. Mothers voice and madonna when it runs.. Lol


Yea, I know the sound. Kind of like scratching your fingernails on a chalkboard. Good luck, dozier
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
637 Posts
I think it is better to address the noise by polishing rather than shoot it smooth. The noise obviously indicates unwanted friction between the op rod and spring which could cause premature wear. Not to mention its just annoying. Just my opinion.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top