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O-Ring Solution

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The shims don't real do anything, except possibly help you sleep better.

Put the gas lock on all the way. It usually stops around 10 o'clock. Back it down to 6. Tap the gas cylinder forward so that it is tight against the lock. Install the piston and plug. Tighten the plug to 15 ft-lbs.

That's the way is was designed.

I'm at the West end of 195. I shoot over at FTR&PA, just over the Delaware in PA.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
The shims don't real do anything, except possibly help you sleep better.

Put the gas lock on all the way. It usually stops around 10 o'clock. Back it down to 6. Tap the gas cylinder forward so that it is tight against the lock. Install the piston and plug. Tighten the plug to 15 ft-lbs.

That's the way is was designed.

I'm at the West end of 195. I shoot over at FTR&PA, just over the Delaware in PA.
Across the street from Silvi concrete?
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
That be the place.
Small world, my jobsite gets all our concrete from them, haha. I definitely appreciate the offer sir, and the next time I get the chance I will try and make it out to you. I definitely could use someone with some real experience on the platform. I'll send you a message when I get the chance
 

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Welcome to the testing. You Sir have passed with flying colors. We used to ask newbies to find the keys to a specific aircraft or so many yards of flightline. Don't let it bother you.

No O ring and skip the shims. Install gas cylinder on barrel as far as it will go then turn on the lock as far as it will go and return back to 6 oclock slide the cylinder up tight to the lock and install the plug. Easy as pie an there is no need to worry about gas lock timing.

Phil, if your piston gets speckled you might need an NSU test.
 

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Since you have found the best M14/M1A sight in existance, track down Tony Ben's video's on the care and feeding of the M1A and watch them several times. You'll then know what is needed for these great rifles. Glad to see you have taken the harasment in good faith and haven't let it bother you. Good to have you here and enjoy your new rifle but don't expect it to shoot nats a$$ from the get go. Takes awhile to learn how to shoot it well - and then there are some who never learn (me).
 

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Now that we have that out of the way, pour a glass of your favorite spirit and watch these two videos...







The bible is FM 23-8. Chapter 5 shows the important grease points.

FM 23-8 U.S. Rifle 7.62-MM, M14 : United States. Department of the Army : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive

FM 23-71 will help you at the range. Chapter 3 covers the sights.

FM 23-71 Rifle Marksmanship : United States. Department of the Army : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive

When your brain can't handle any more, we dumb things down a bit on this thread...

PS Magazine
 

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Was it new? Or used?

Did it have an o-ring on it when you first bought it, looked at it?

I had to ask. The only thing I've seen people use an o-ring on it help keep a muzzle thread protector tight on a threaded pistol barrel.

Made me wonder if someone had an issue with the gas plug coming loose and decided to try putting an o-ring on it to see if that would keep it from coming loose.

I need another cup of coffee.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Was it new? Or used?

Did it have an o-ring on it when you first bought it, looked at it?

I had to ask. The only thing I've seen people use an o-ring on it help keep a muzzle thread protector tight on a threaded pistol barrel.

Made me wonder if someone had an issue with the gas plug coming loose and decided to try putting an o-ring on it to see if that would keep it from coming loose.

I need another cup of coffee.
I bought the rifle new, and could have swore it did have one when I took it apart the one other time. But I honestly could be mis-remembering it. It looks like there is even a notch right before the shoulder of the gas plug the perfect size of an oring
 

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An o-ring would not be the correct fix for such an issue (and might not even work).

The correct way to fix it is using the proper torque to tighten the gas plug. Try that first and see if the plug stays tight.

I have seen threads worn/damaged to the point where things wouldn't stay tight. In those cases the fix was new bolts/nuts with new threads to make the thread metal to metal friction work to keep the pieces tight. In the M14 gas system that's a new gas plug or a new gas cylinder, or both. I don't know of a tool/gauge for measuring the thread condition on those parts but there may be one that experienced armorers use.

Good luck with it.
 
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I will also add that "shimming" tends to to make the "seizing" issue a bit worse. The lock was intended to have a little play in it, to avoid any side pressure against the threads when installing the plug.
Hypothetically, if I wanted to verify this information, would you be able to point me towards a definitive source? (Not that I don’t believe you but I would love to have a more in depth understanding of the platform). Thanks.


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Hypothetically, if I wanted to verify this information, would you be able to point me towards a definitive source? (Not that I don’t believe you but I would love to have a more in depth understanding of the platform). Thanks.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
When you are installing the plug into an unshimmed gas cylinder, the lock has enough play to allow the plug to thread smoothly and evenly. Same for removing the plug.

With a shimmed cylinder, the lock doesn't have any ability to move. I've removed plugs that clearly were rubbing against a lock that was not perfectly centered. You can see the rub marks on the smooth part of the plug. This also means that the threads were receiving side pressure.

I've yet to see any good that comes from using shims.
 

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Our Doc on the boat was so good when I went too too show him I had rust on the pipe, his one look and one reply was you sure do.
Hello, Ha.
That's funny, Phil...
It reminds me of riding the school bus into the base on Monday mornings in the PI(the last gate before the **** river hit the Ocean). There was a Sickhall/Medical Dispensary, that the GIs would line-up too for their (Q-tip up the shaft) test, after the weekend out in town with the local lady friends(to much short time, joe)..
Didn't matter, The Clap or the Drip, could be taken care of with a shot of penicillin.. a little goes a long way. So, I was told. Thanks, for the flash back Phil.
 
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