M14 Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently decided to get some reloading equipment and am trying to learn everything I can about it. Case volume is a bit confusing to me and I am trying to understand how someone would go about to work up a new load. For instance a lot of people here use LC brass/IMR4985/41.5g/168gr but I have a lot of zqi brass I want to reload and I hear the LC brass has more volume than the zqi brass.

To me, this is how I see trying to figure how much grains to use for the ZQI brass. I take the max volume for the LC and divide it by 41.5 to give me a percentage that it fills up and then take my max volume for ZQI and take the percentage I got for LC and do that math to give me the amount of gains I should use for the ZQI brass ? Would using this procedure be a safe starting point and then fine tune my reloads for accuracy and fps. I just want someone to verify if that is correct before I go and experiment.... Sorry if this sounds confusing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,796 Posts
Don't over-think it. Just about every case made can easily fit up to 43 grains of stick powder with a 168 grain bullet.

1. Stick powder doesn't settle like ball powder does. Put your finger over the case mouth and tap the base on your reloading bench a few times. The powder will settle a bit and you won't hear the crunching sound when you seat the bullet.

2. Load your 168 and 175's out to 2.82 inches (magazine length) instead of 2.80 inches.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,611 Posts
I recently decided to get some reloading equipment and am trying to learn everything I can about it. Case volume is a bit confusing to me and I am trying to understand how someone would go about to work up a new load. For instance a lot of people here use LC brass/IMR4985/41.5g/168gr but I have a lot of zqi brass I want to reload and I hear the LC brass has more volume than the zqi brass.

To me, this is how I see trying to figure how much grains to use for the ZQI brass. I take the max volume for the LC and divide it by 41.5 to give me a percentage that it fills up and then take my max volume for ZQI and take the percentage I got for LC and do that math to give me the amount of gains I should use for the ZQI brass ? Would using this procedure be a safe starting point and then fine tune my reloads for accuracy and fps. I just want someone to verify if that is correct before I go and experiment.... Sorry if this sounds confusing.
Someone correct me if I'm incorrect, but military brass has LESS volume.

Outer dimensions are the same for any type of brass, military brass is thicker, therefore inside dimension is smaller, which equals less volume.

Don't over think it.

I've been loading for a few years and still learning.

The load you stated above is pretty much accepted across the members here.

Start there and adjust up (not much) or down until you and your rifle are happy.

Probably find the 41.5 works.

I use the same load regardless of military or commercial brass.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,512 Posts
I wouldn't worry about it. if youre getting into compressed loads, youre getting into (or are in) the danger zone for these rifles. if you have a reloading book that has a service rifle section go off of what that says.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,611 Posts
I wouldn't worry about it. if youre getting into compressed loads, youre getting into (or are in) the danger zone for these rifles. if you have a reloading book that has a service rifle section go off of what that says.
Good advice.

The Hornady. Handbook of Cartridge Reloading, 9th edition has a section on reloading for Service Rifles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,490 Posts
Thanks for all the advice. Guess I will start with 41.5g and get a chronograph and fine tune from there.
Not to muddy the water but my rifle, a supermatch, seems to like a bit on the lighter side of life... Shot great with 39.5/h4895 with 175 Sierra's until a put the 'grooved Sadlak' gas piston in and it started shortstroking so I bumped up to 40.0 grains/LC brass and shoots great @ 100 meters and 400 meters where I check
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
Thanks for all the advice. Guess I will start with 41.5g and get a chronograph and fine tune from there.
My 2 cents, unless you plan to hunt with your load, chrono isn't necessary. I load and shoot for good groups and rifle functions. Who cares if your chrono tells you you are 50 fps below what is supposed to, but you get a nice groups?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,796 Posts
My 2 cents, unless you plan to hunt with your load, chrono isn't necessary. I load and shoot for good groups and rifle functions. Who cares if your chrono tells you you are 50 fps below what is supposed to, but you get a nice groups?
A chrono is necessary for long distance shooting. 175's drop like a rock unless you get them up to speed. They also need to stay supersonic at 1000 yds to remain stable. It is generally accepted that the muzzle velocity needs to be at least 2600 to accomplish this.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top