M14 Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I am inspecting an SA M1A for potential purchase and have come across a few points of interest that I hope the regulars here can make some comment on.
The rifle was purchased in early '98 ( I have all the original inspection/headspace cards/warranty docs., ect.) and is in the 1096xx serial number range.
I had my gunsmith pal look it over the other day and he thinks it was never fired except for a factory proofing? due to a very slight copper deposit in the barrel, and no wear to speak of in the finish on the bolt face or the op rod contact or sliding surfaces.
There seems to have been a good bit of special order ?? involved in the original delivery from Springfield.
The barrel is a stainless steel -marked NM.308-SS & Springfield Geneseo with what seems like a heavy profile chamber area (1" diameter).
I'm going to make some time and call Springfield to learn what they say about which barrel it was fitted with. At that time (1998) a heavy weight SS Kreiger barrel was an option or also a Hart SS barrel was in their price list.
I haven't checked it for twist rate yet.
The stock is walnut, and oversize that shows in just about all areas ( foregrip, buttplate area, receiver support around the inletting) and does NOT have any bedding nor extra lug. Beautiful grain, very straight and fine/tight. Besides the lack of bedding the wood seems to fit very nice.
When I inspect the action, gas system, and fire control group I am finding a TRW bolt, TRW op rod, TRW trigger housing.
The gas cylinder has markings of a capitol "T" inside a circle both stamped (under the barrel) with the letters E and L on either side of the mark, and the same T inside a circle (larger) can be seen very faintly on one side that looks like a casting/forging? remnant.
When I look at the FCG (without taking it apart) I am seeing HR and H&R marked on the safety quadrant and the hammer.
I am appalled by a weld that was applied to the striking surface of the hammer and crudely ground before being reparkerized. Is this a common thing to find in these parts sets?
It seems obvious that the receiver is a contemporary Springfield commercial part.
I would like to know if there are any other parts I should be studying for GI identifying marks?
The rifle comes accessorized with a 3rd gen. scope mount in aluminum and a Burris Fullfield I 6x-18x scope with some pretty fair quality steel rings.
Nothing special about the retical, and the finish is matte.
There is also a thousand Winchester white box cartridges included with the package.
Is there anything I need to be on the lookout for? Remember, the rifle show NO signs of use - safe queen- since it's delivery in '98.
Should I even hesitate since I'm inspecting prior to committing @ $ ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,095 Posts
The rifle is an early version of what is now known as a Loaded model. It is a medium weight barrel with a 1/11" twist.

I have a similar one, but with a carbon steel barrel. TRW bolt and oprod, SA trigger group.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,998 Posts
I was under the impression that the medium-weight SS barrel on my 107XXX Loaded was manufactured by Douglass, but I can't remember what lead me to believe that. As far as I can tell, it's all USGI with a TRW bolt, Winchester trigger housing with an H&R hammer (it appears unmolested) and safety, and an H&R op-rod.

It also has the same non-cutout commercial walnut stock as the Standard model, not an oversized NM or SM stock.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,095 Posts
It also has the same non-cutout commercial walnut stock as the Standard model, not an oversized NM or SM stock.
The "non-cutout commercial walnut stock on the Standard model" and the "oversized NM stock" are the same thing. The only difference is that the factory beds the stock to the receiver when it goes on a NM model.

Over the years, there have been subtle differences in the exact size and shape of the belly, depending on which company produced the stock, but they are all oversized. The only normal sized stocks used by SAI were the USGI stocks, in either wood or fiberglass.

The Super Match stock, on the other hand, is considerably larger in the forend and has more of a "closed" grip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
There wasn't a whole lot to learn by calling SAi .
I did get a model number and confirmation that the rifle left their custody with the stainless steel barrel that was marked NM.308 in early 1998.
The origin of the barrel is a secret as far as they are concerned.
When I asked a question about the oversized stock she told me that they "never supplied or installed oversize stocks..."
An interesting thing to note is that the cost for having their shop perform a glass bedding hasn't changed since this rifle was produced in 1998 ($175.00 + shipping both ways). I have their catalogues and price list from then, it came in the paperwork envelope. I inquired about turn-around time and was told to expect up to 60 days.
Is there anyone that specializes in working with the extra wood on these stocks and dehorning? It just seems blocky and unfinished as is.
 

·
Registered
Custom service rifle builder
Joined
·
8,298 Posts
Standard SA stocks have always been sort of medium weight. They use them on standard rifles as well as National Match models. Yours is probably made by Fajen or it could be an early Boyds' stock. Feel free to slim it down some if you feel it's too heavy.

It sounds like it has a few H&R parts to go along with some TRW. It should be a good rifle as is. The T marked gas cylinder is H&R.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
missing ferrule

Uhg....
man, if I wasn't thoroughly mistaken....
bad lighting... poor observation. worthless excuses.
I only had the stock and barreled action apart once, in a poorly lit circumstance, and ended up talking out of my ass.
If I'd have dismantled and looked at/felt the wood's end grain again I wouldn't have made such a dumb mistake
Again, I was mistaken, and edited out the "dohh!" moment.
I'll look twice, and report accurately from here on out.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,174 Posts
The origin of the barrel is a secret as far as they are concerned.
You never know how long the person answering the phone has been working there so they if fact may not know themselves, however the maker of your barrel is no big secret it was made by Wilson with a 1/11 ROT. Truth be known, Wilson barrels shoot way better than they should.
 

·
In the gilded halls of Valhala
Joined
·
13,515 Posts
I too after reading MANY reports of folks calling about the history of their rifle and it sounds like you got someone new. Others have gotten much more information about their rifle.


When you sell rifles you better be prepared to say where your barrels blanks come from and who machines them or I'm not interested.


Pick up a USGI wood stock. You seem like the kinda guy who would appreciate a nice one.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,174 Posts
I too after reading MANY reports of folks calling about the history of their rifle and it sounds like you got someone new. Others have gotten much more information about their rifle.


When you sell rifles you better be prepared to say where your barrels blanks come from and who machines them or I'm not interested.


Pick up a USGI wood stock. You seem like the kinda guy who would appreciate a nice one.
Wilson makes the tube, SAI does the finish contouring, install and headspace.

I heard a rumor that Mossburg is there current barrel maker and SAI handles the rest..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,465 Posts
pe the regulars here can make some comment on.
The rifle was purchased in early '98 ( I have all the original inspection/headspace cards/warranty docs., ect.) and is in the 1096xx serial number range.
There seems to have been a good bit of special order ?? involved in the original delivery from Springfield.
The barrel is a stainless steel -marked NM.308-SS & Springfield Geneseo with what seems like a heavy profile chamber area (1" diameter).
The stock is walnut, and oversize that shows in just about all areas ( foregrip, buttplate area, receiver support around the inletting) and does NOT have any bedding nor extra lug. Beautiful grain, very straight and fine/tight. Besides the lack of bedding the wood seems to fit very nice.
The gas cylinder has markings of a capitol "T" inside a circle both stamped (under the barrel) with the letters E and L on either side of the mark, and the same T inside a circle (larger) can be seen very faintly on one side that looks like a casting/forging? remnant.
The gas cylinder was made by The Torrington Company (Torrington, CT), a subcontractor to Harrington & Richardson Arms for its M14 rifle project. The rifle wears a Fajen stock, likely a Style II model. The barrel was likely manufactured by Hart.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top