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Regarding Turtle's very informative Youtube video on his post no. 10:

http://m14forum.com/handguns/102206-opinions-springfield-xd-45-compact.html#post736233

I have a confession to make. Actually, two. And I'm a so-called gun professional, which should tell you all something. I even do gun handling training seminars. But with a new respect, as you'll read below....

About 30 years ago [1981!!!; Gawd: where HAS the time gone?] I was the on-site bear monitor guy at a big new coal mine project up in Canada (the infamous NE Coal Project @ Tumbler Ridge. A very dirty little political situation, but that's another fireside story...)

Anyhow, long story shortened, I had just answered a call at about 7:30 in the long northern Canadian evening, about a wandering problem black bear that was terrorizing the boys in the main "1000 man" camp, and I and a good friend took our rifles and tried to find said problem bear. I usually carried an 870 with a few plastic slugs up first, but this bear was identified as the one that was now used to breaking in to the bunkhouse trailer and harassing the boys, usually at about 3:00am. It also turns out that black bears really like the aroma of weed being smoked, but that is also another very entertaining story.... <sigh>.

So anyhow, we briefly spotted the culprit, and he took off at a premium fast gallop (having been bounced in the butt twice before with an AAI nylon slug... ouchy!). We then lost him in the many buildings and construction clutter, and we eventually gave up, yelling out to him that we'd get him later!

And so my friend was walking along in front, me directly behind him, and we were approaching our camp truck. I was carrying a Marlin 1895 in 45-70 (THE approved bear medicine, BTW...) and this was a 1978 model, without the stupid side-push safety. Just the usual and (sufficient?) half-, which it was parked at.

Trouble was, I wanted to now unload it, so I pulled back the hammer a bit to unload the sear, and was letting the hammer down slowly, and guess what? It slipped out of my thumb, and fired a nice 350 gr JFP right over my friend's now very surprised head. It then "splatted" against the top of the nearby massive coal silo up at about 250 feet in the air. We found the mark the next day with binoculars. That mark's still there for all I know....

Fortunately, I did not have the rifle pointing anywhere but up. Down would also have worked, but might have created a ricochet.

Lesson learned? ALWAYS point the rifle somewhere safe because you might screw up. I also later practiced lowering that hammer (on an unloaded rifle of course) until I had the procedure down pat. I also added a bar with lots of sharp checkering on it to that hammer.

Well, not so bad, huh? The next one is, however, VERY BAD!

Turtle's point about "Interference" is at play in this one.

I had been working on an ammo loading project for a customer's small Charter Arms handgun all day long. I'd been carefully checking every 20 or so rounds that nothing was changing in terms of easy chambering of my rounds into this little compact gun. I had been inserting and emptying it about 20 or 30 times during the day. No problem, right?

You are right. It was safe. That particular firearm. Quite safe.

But then.... GI3... I was also scheduled to give a brief seminar the next day on CCW firearms handling in various real-world situations, and I was practicing the unholstering and aiming moves in my kitchen, (the wife was, fortunately, out, and still does not know of any of this...) but I was now using my own CCW carry SW J-Frame. Yup.....

I was talking out loud in order to practice my little presentation, and finally, I pulled my gun, which, in my mind, ("Interference Thinking", remember??) was that little gun I'd been handling, in a safe manner, all day long. Of course it was unloaded. Of course!!! Oh, and did I mention that by this time, I was quite tired? Right? Riiiiggghhhtttt...

Well, obviously, it wasn't unloaded, of course, and as I demo'd a nice safe double-action trigger pull while aiming at some imaginary "perp", I launched a potentially deadly little .32 cal 90 gr JHP @ ≈1100 fps through my kitchen wall, through 2 layers of 1/2" plywood, two levels of drywall board, and a bunch of magazines that were stacked on a shelf on the other side of all those obstacles.

The bullet, which had barely mushroomed, then hit the next layer of drywall wall about 5 feet further, and it fell, Ker-Plunk, into the cat litter box. Which was very appropriate, because I had just yelled "Oh !"!!

Aside from my hearing, which took about 1.2h to come back, nothing but the walls and magazines (oh, and our plastic dustpan, which still has an inexplicable .32 cal hole in it, which my wife has asked about a few times...) were "injured". An ultra-fast wallboard patch-up ensured.

Problem is, I'd let my previous afternoon's relentless load-check-unload experience, just a few hours earlier, completely cloud my current judgement, and I was really tired. I've since thought long & hard about this one, since I do not want to ever do it again! Yes, I was pointing the firearm in safe direction, but still: it does tell me that Sheisse can happen, and Murphy will ensure that it does.

As well, OBVIOUSLY, make DAMN SURE you're always awake and aware when playing with firearms (we all know that, right?), and that, unless you're going down a dark alley to settle a score, unload that piece before you practice stuff with it!

There. I've 'fessed up. And no-one got hurt. OK; Fire Away! I can take it! (PS: anyone else need to clear their conscience? After all, you're sorta anonymous here, right?)

And so, red-faced, I now skulk off into my dark cave.....
 

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MesaRifle,

Thank you for the reminder, this could happen to any of us, we must always be cognizant of every move we make when handling firearms, never second guessing or taking our mind off it for even one second. It's stories like this that keeps us all on our toes.

Phinehas
 

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+1 on the big thanks!

There's a "reloading mistakes in real time" thread on the 1911 Forum which is a real education. I thought I was the only moron who managed to empty a powder measure into the wrong powder jug...

It's all too easy to get comfortable with our firearms and relax about the fundamental safety rules. Rusty could've punched a big, bad hole in his buddy but didn't because while he broke one rule, at least the rifle was pointed in a safe direction.
 

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There's a man that comes out to shoot with us at our local matches who has plenty ND's that need explaining. He's the type of guy that would look down the barrel to make sure the bullets are coming out. In the last 6 weeks, I've counted 5 negligent discharges. FIVE!
dance2

Well, this same man tried to give me a safety lecture because I forgot to say "Load and make ready" while he was getting ready to start a stage at our last USPSA match. Once we started the stage, he got two targets in, then shot at a steel. He turned around and broke the 180 to ask me if he hit it. That STI .38 super was pointed right in my chest.

Scared me, but I did get the pleasure to say DQ! GET THE F*** OUT OF HERE! DISHOUT

From then on, I refuse to be his RO, or even be in the same bay as him while he's on the line.
 

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Hey Mesa,

I was just in your neck of the woods today. We dropped off your youngest son at (CWU) Central WA University for school.

Yup accidental discharges happens. Happened to a Marine Corporal I know, he was an armorer too. Well a week later he was a Lance Corporal.
 

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u r not alone

Regarding Turtle's very informative Youtube video on his post no. 10:

http://m14forum.com/handguns/102206-opinions-springfield-xd-45-compact.html#post736233

I have a confession to make. Actually, two. And I'm a so-called gun professional, which should tell you all something. I even do gun handling training seminars. But with a new respect, as you'll read below....

About 30 years ago [1981!!!; Gawd: where HAS the time gone?] I was the on-site bear monitor guy at a big new coal mine project up in Canada (the infamous NE Coal Project @ Tumbler Ridge. A very dirty little political situation, but that's another fireside story...)

Anyhow, long story shortened, I had just answered a call at about 7:30 in the long northern Canadian evening, about a wandering problem black bear that was terrorizing the boys in the main "1000 man" camp, and I and a good friend took our rifles and tried to find said problem bear. I usually carried an 870 with a few plastic slugs up first, but this bear was identified as the one that was now used to breaking in to the bunkhouse trailer and harassing the boys, usually at about 3:00am. It also turns out that black bears really like the aroma of weed being smoked, but that is also another very entertaining story.... <sigh>.

So anyhow, we briefly spotted the culprit, and he took off at a premium fast gallop (having been bounced in the butt twice before with an AAI nylon slug... ouchy!). We then lost him in the many buildings and construction clutter, and we eventually gave up, yelling out to him that we'd get him later!

And so my friend was walking along in front, me directly behind him, and we were approaching our camp truck. I was carrying a Marlin 1895 in 45-70 (THE approved bear medicine, BTW...) and this was a 1978 model, without the stupid side-push safety. Just the usual and (sufficient?) half-, which it was parked at.

Trouble was, I wanted to now unload it, so I pulled back the hammer a bit to unload the sear, and was letting the hammer down slowly, and guess what? It slipped out of my thumb, and fired a nice 350 gr JFP right over my friend's now very surprised head. It then "splatted" against the top of the nearby massive coal silo up at about 250 feet in the air. We found the mark the next day with binoculars. That mark's still there for all I know....

Fortunately, I did not have the rifle pointing anywhere but up. Down would also have worked, but might have created a ricochet.

Lesson learned? ALWAYS point the rifle somewhere safe because you might screw up. I also later practiced lowering that hammer (on an unloaded rifle of course) until I had the procedure down pat. I also added a bar with lots of sharp checkering on it to that hammer.

Well, not so bad, huh? The next one is, however, VERY BAD!

Turtle's point about "Interference" is at play in this one.

I had been working on an ammo loading project for a customer's small Charter Arms handgun all day long. I'd been carefully checking every 20 or so rounds that nothing was changing in terms of easy chambering of my rounds into this little compact gun. I had been inserting and emptying it about 20 or 30 times during the day. No problem, right?

You are right. It was safe. That particular firearm. Quite safe.

But then.... GI3... I was also scheduled to give a brief seminar the next day on CCW firearms handling in various real-world situations, and I was practicing the unholstering and aiming moves in my kitchen, (the wife was, fortunately, out, and still does not know of any of this...) but I was now using my own CCW carry SW J-Frame. Yup.....

I was talking out loud in order to practice my little presentation, and finally, I pulled my gun, which, in my mind, ("Interference Thinking", remember??) was that little gun I'd been handling, in a safe manner, all day long. Of course it was unloaded. Of course!!! Oh, and did I mention that by this time, I was quite tired? Right? Riiiiggghhhtttt...

Well, obviously, it wasn't unloaded, of course, and as I demo'd a nice safe double-action trigger pull while aiming at some imaginary "perp", I launched a potentially deadly little .32 cal 90 gr JHP @ ≈1100 fps through my kitchen wall, through 2 layers of 1/2" plywood, two levels of drywall board, and a bunch of magazines that were stacked on a shelf on the other side of all those obstacles.

The bullet, which had barely mushroomed, then hit the next layer of drywall wall about 5 feet further, and it fell, Ker-Plunk, into the cat litter box. Which was very appropriate, because I had just yelled "Oh !"!!

Aside from my hearing, which took about 1.2h to come back, nothing but the walls and magazines (oh, and our plastic dustpan, which still has an inexplicable .32 cal hole in it, which my wife has asked about a few times...) were "injured". An ultra-fast wallboard patch-up ensured.

Problem is, I'd let my previous afternoon's relentless load-check-unload experience, just a few hours earlier, completely cloud my current judgement, and I was really tired. I've since thought long & hard about this one, since I do not want to ever do it again! Yes, I was pointing the firearm in safe direction, but still: it does tell me that Sheisse can happen, and Murphy will ensure that it does.

As well, OBVIOUSLY, make DAMN SURE you're always awake and aware when playing with firearms (we all know that, right?), and that, unless you're going down a dark alley to settle a score, unload that piece before you practice stuff with it!

There. I've 'fessed up. And no-one got hurt. OK; Fire Away! I can take it! (PS: anyone else need to clear their conscience? After all, you're sorta anonymous here, right?)

And so, red-faced, I now skulk off into my dark cave.....
i have had 2 AD's in my lifetime,and definately muzzle control is #1 in my book,it keeps things from being fatal. still extremely embarassing. another rule i follow,now anyway,is to allow no loaded ammo in the work area.many of us are very skilled in the handling of firearms but there inlies the risk.safe in the cage results in accidents. create and never break your own SOP for handling firearms and you will never have an accident.
 
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