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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone I'm in need of some advice. So the bottom part of my forend has broke out. I installed a smith rail so I could run a bipod. After some abuse to the area the bottom front section of the stock broke. What can I do to fix it?? is it even fixable?? The stock is from my springfield NM and i really want to salvage it. it does not appear to be any cracks or fractures in the wood running towards there trigger. I was thinking about using some Marintex to patch the hole. Should I try to put a donor piece of walnut in the gap to help? any help would be great.
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Me..
Depending on how nice of a grain pattern on the rest of the stock...
If I had the piece that broke out, and it was in one piece, I would glue it back in.
With the right wood glue the broken joint would be stronger then the original grain seam and not really noticeable at the bottom of the forearm
 

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If the piece(s) that broke out are available and usable, I'd try using glue (maybe epoxy) to put it back together. I think trying to make a new piece to fit would be a lot of work ...
 

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find a big red and build from there
 

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Ha! Hey, at least so far you seem to have a really rock solid consensus on which way to go, fix or firewood? :unsure::ROFLMAO:
I guess If that happened to me, I'd be looking for another stock but I'd probably stash this one out in the garage for now, you never know...
 

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If you have the broken piece; I would clean the 2 pieces with a degreaser. and when dry; glue the piece back with a bout 4 brass screws on each side.
 

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1. If you install a bipod rail to the forend of an M14 stock, it is vitally important that you only attach the bipod to the rear of the rail, under the mounting screws. If you attach the bipod to the unsupported front of the rail, the above will eventually happen.

2. I would use Brownells Acra Glas bedding epoxy, in brown, to try to repair this stock.
 

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Since it’s a Springfield NM rifle, I presume it’s glass bedded. I also assume you want to keep it glass bedded. If it were me, I would do the following:

1. Call SAI Customer Service today and ask for an RMA number to ship it back for a new stock and bedding job. Also ask if they can still install their bipod stud at the front swivel for about $50. Their number: 1-800-680-6866
2. Ship it back this Thursday or Friday w/ letter re work (carefully protected within a plastic case)
3. Wait 30 to 45 days or so for their phone call to let you know its complete
4. Pay them what will likely be a fairly reasonable fee once done. Probably not a warranty repair but SAI has been known to really take care of their customers...in my experience even with a 1989 era SAI NM they re-bedded it at no charge back in 2014.
5. Get your rifle back sometime in June and enjoy it for the rest of the summer...maybe with a nice bipod stud install too.

That’s likely your cheapest and best option to replace and re-bed the stock and get the bipod stud properly installed into the stock at the same time....while maintaining your warranty and maintaining what I presume is a glass-bedded NM rifle. There is a warranty advantage to owning an SAI M1A, so I would pursue that option above all others, esp if its one of their bedded NM rifles.

FYI: Here's the bipod stud that SAI installed in my M21 Tactical Match 11 years ago. This install should not result in the crack that you experienced unless the rifle gets dropped or some other abuse.
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
hahahaha well id like to thank you all for the great advice and some laughs!!!!! I will keep you all posted on the outcome of there stock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Since it’s a Springfield NM rifle, I presume it’s glass bedded. I also assume you want to keep it glass bedded. If it were me, I would do the following:

1. Call SAI Customer Service today and ask for an RMA number to ship it back for a new stock and bedding job. Also ask if they can still install their bipod stud at the front swivel for about $50. Their number: 1-800-680-6866
2. Ship it back this Thursday or Friday w/ letter re work (carefully protected within a plastic case)
3. Wait 30 to 45 days or so for their phone call to let you know its complete
4. Pay them what will likely be a fairly reasonable fee once done. Probably not a warranty repair but SAI has been known to really take care of their customers...in my experience even with a 1989 era SAI NM they re-bedded it at no charge back in 2014.
5. Get your rifle back sometime in June and enjoy it for the rest of the summer...maybe with a nice bipod stud install too.

That’s likely your cheapest and best option to replace and re-bed the stock and get the bipod stud properly installed into the stock at the same time....while maintaining your warranty and maintaining what I presume is a glass-bedded NM rifle. There is a warranty advantage to owning an SAI M1A, so I would pursue that option above all others, esp if its one of their bedded NM rifles.

FYI: Here's the bipod stud that SAI installed in my M21 Tactical Match 11 years ago. This install should not result in the crack that you experienced unless the rifle gets dropped or some other abuse.
View attachment 449960
hmm that's an idea that i never thought of. I was not aware that SAI would do anything like that. I will give them a call tomorrow.
 

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If you have an original SAI NM M1A that hasn't been heavily modified (other than that damaged stock via a bipod rail install), it makes sense to take advantage of their lifetime warranty. Even if its a non-warranty repair such as yours, the repair cost is usually on the low end, and the turn around time is typically quicker than any of the independent M1A gunsmiths. Esp if bedding the rifle is required.

When it comes to repairs, SAI's customer service can not be beat. SAI achieved "economies of scale" a long time ago, and should have most, if not all parts, in stock for pretty much any repairs. I suspect they have dozens and dozens of new stocks sitting on shelfs for the repair you need. I've even read about them providing a new receiver and new barrel on 15 or 20 year old M1A when the cartridge clip guide somehow got cracked off - at no charge to the customer. That's an unprecedented level of service. Good luck and keep us posted.
 

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Try repairing it first.
First remove/dry any oil from the cracked wood surfaces with Brake Cleaner (wear gloves), then epoxy/Gorilla Glue back in place; using clamps.
Then as added insurance, use whst are called Ishpore Screws.
You can use overlong screws, as in the photo, or just a screw long enough to require cutting off the top. Drill pilot holes, place more adhesive on the screw, then cut the brass slightly pround when the adhesive is dry , then grind flush; using a grinding bit on a drill. Good Luck !
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