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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I made it to the range today with my first loads. I was using ggg brass, cci #34 primers, Imr 4895, smk #2200. I had 38.5, 39, and 39.5 gn loads. I shot these 5 shot groups at 100 yards. I have a springfield scout.

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Looks good! If you try 40.0 / 40.5 / 41.0 etc... Let us know the results. It's hard to beat 168smks, they fly purdy good!
 

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Discus,
That looks great.
Start setting your charges at .3 gr variance to find your rifles sweet spot. It looks like your almost there. I would be quite happy at your 39.5 gr loads.
I may have to send you some of my GGG cases, bullets, primers and powder and have you make some cartidges for me.
Well done,
Glenn
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Haha, Glenn, I have literally only loaded these 15 rounds in my life. I don't think you want me reloading you rounds.

So I should work my way up from 39.5? I know it will take some time but I'm eventually looking for the best load that will do me good from 100-500 yards.
 

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and you were worried about setting the primers too deep.
Great job on your Rounds and Shooting. It is Quite Satisfying is it not????
As stated above Start reducing the Charge weights and Your rifle will let you know when you hit its sweet spot
Just so you know your "Man Card" has been Up Graded
 

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Haha, Glenn, I have literally only loaded these 15 rounds in my life. I don't think you want me reloading you rounds.

So I should work my way up from 39.5? I know it will take some time but I'm eventually looking for the best load that will do me good from 100-500 yards.
There is room to tweek your loads a little. With the GGG brass I would not go above 40.5 gr for now. Your rifle will let you know when it's just right. Just keep an eye out for pressure signs and you should be alright.
Now that you won't be making any rounds for me, I'm headed back to the reloading bench.

Glenn
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes very satisfying. I just seated these bullets at roughly 2.81 from measuring base to tip. I got home today and did it the right way with oal gauge and comparator. I measured 2.279 at the lands. So I figure if I take off .04 I will be 2.239/ 2.815.

I did notice that 2/5 of my cases at 38.5gn did not extract after being fired. I was only loading 1 round in magazine when I was testing these rounds. 1 of the cases was pulled out and just laying on the magazine and the other was stuck in the chamber and it took I used my knife at the rim to dislodge it and it came right out. But it just threw me off. I am not sure if that's a sizing issue or something else. All these rounds chambered fine.
 

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I know it's a PIA but keep notes. I use a removable label on the box of ammo. A quick note at the time of occurrence will help you big time. You can make adjustments and find that sweet spot. Do you know what to look for when we say look for pressure signs? When your rifle ejects a spent round where does it go? It's important. Look up ejection pattern on old posts.
Reloading is a blast. You are wearing safety glasses right?
 

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It only gets more adicting

It is so much fun it becomes a hobby of it's own. Good shootin... Keep going slow asking questions and building your own rounds. It was only about a year ago I was in your shoes. I am no pro but building better and better bullets and for different weapons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I know it's a PIA but keep notes. I use a removable label on the box of ammo. A quick note at the time of occurrence will help you big time. You can make adjustments and find that sweet spot. Do you know what to look for when we say look for pressure signs? When your rifle ejects a spent round where does it go? It's important. Look up ejection pattern on old posts.
Reloading is a blast. You are wearing safety glasses right?
I was looking at my cases after each firing. I was looking at the neck and down near the rim for cracks or stress. I did notice differences in the way they were ejecting. What does this mean? Is it differences in the brass itself or something I'm doing?

safety glasses? An m14 and oakley blades go hand in hand.
 

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I was looking at my cases after each firing. I was looking at the neck and down near the rim for cracks or stress. I did notice differences in the way they were ejecting. What does this mean? Is it differences in the brass itself or something I'm doing?
Discus,
When we ask about pressure signs we are talking about flattened primers, cratering on the firing pin strike and ejector/extractor marks on the base. Do a google image search if you are not sure. As for how your cases eject, the higher the charge the harder they fling.

And A+++ for keeping a log book for your loads.

Glenn
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Discus,
When we ask about pressure signs we are talking about flattened primers, cratering on the firing pin strike and ejector/extractor marks on the base. Do a google image search if you are not sure. As for how your cases eject, the higher the charge the harder they fling.

And A+++ for keeping a log book for your loads.

Glenn
Yes I believe everything you said was happening to some degree. I noticed the rim of my cases to be much more chewed up than when I loaded them. Also, I seated the primers deep and noticed that after firing they seemed to be moved out towards the base.

Just took a better look at my cases. I decapped a few. The primers do look to be a little flattened. They look to be this way on all my loads.

So what now? I go lower on my loads?
 

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Primers moving back to the base is normal. If you can, please post pictures of the base/primer of your fired cases.
These rifles also chew up the brass a bit.

Glenn
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Primers moving back to the base is normal. If you can, please post pictures of the base/primer of your fired cases.
These rifles also chew up the brass a bit.

Glenn
Ok, I'll take pictures now. should have them up in about 25 minutes. Thanks for your help Glenn.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Here is the fired brass from the 39.5gn loads. Let me know if this is signs of pressure. Thanks.

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Here are more pictures.

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39 grains

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38.5 grains
 

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Is it just me, or do they all look about the same? Looks a little flat to me.
 

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I to shoot IMR 4895/#34's/GGG cases, but with a 165 gr Horn SST. My primers look exactly like that also. As I was getting an average velocity of 2461fps for a 10 rd string, I've still been working up the charge from there. I'd also like to know if others think those primers are flattened excessively. Mine primers do not show any signs of cratering. dozier
 

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Here is the fired brass from the 39.5gn loads. Let me know if this is signs of pressure. Thanks.

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Reading the primers is a sort of subjective and you won't get the same answer from any two people in most cases. There are signs that everyone knows are bad like ejector marks pressed in to the brass or a hole in a primer or signs of gas having escaped around the primer on new brass but the signs of excessive pressure is usually not that easy to define.

It looks to me like there are signs of pressure increasing with each of your loads and I would say that the 39.5gr load seems to be getting pretty close to the top end but the one thing I use to determine when the pressure is at the absolute top end is the flatness of the primer.

Some people will look for an indication that the primer material is beginning to flow around the firing pin (your 39.5 gr load seems to show signs of that, thats the little curl of primer material that is raised around the firing pin indentation) but I have found that some rifles and some primers can cause this to happen even when the pressures are OK. My favorite sign to look for is when the primer has been flattened to the point where there is no real gap between the outside edge of the primer cup and the wall of the primer pocket in the brass. Your pictures don't seem to show that happening yet. Oh, and don't misunderstand, that gap will start to get smaller in increments so what I'm saying is watch the gap for signs of it getting smaller and when you see that it is getting smaller than you are just under the max pressure that I would be willing to work with. Eventually the gap disappears and when that happens your brass is really taking a pounding. In fact I throw my brass away if I see that happen because chances are the case will split within another reload or two.

The one thing that will affect the pressure very quickly is the volume in the case. Anything that creates less volume will raise the pressure. Seating the bullet deeper or using a bullet that is longer than another will lessen the usable volume of the case and that will cause higher pressures. So while I say that your 39.5gr charge weight should be OK it might be getting hotter than it would for me because I might assemble the cartridge a little different than you.

And most of us seem to find the best charge weight for the 168gr bullets is somewhere around 40 - 41.5 gr of IMR 4895. But every rifle is unique and you need to take all the appropriate safety precautions while you work up to the load you're happy with.
 
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