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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm curious as to how many Service Rifle shooters "milk" the trigger in rapid fire?

That is to hold the trigger to the rear after a shot until sight picture/alignment has been reaquired. Then release the trigger just enough to allow it to reset without going back into the first trigger stage, in essence making it act like a single stage trigger.

Regards

Jim
 

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I do. I've never heard it referred to as "milking" though.
It's the best and most efficient way to make the shot.
My M1-A trigger works like that. The AR trigger has some take up after the trigger resets so this technique is not possible.

pg
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Milking is the only thing I've ever heard it called. But I don't think it was commonly used in my neck of the woods.

I should have specified M1A /Garand. I don't know much about the AR.

I played with the technique some when I was shooting a lot. I'm easing back into Service Rifle and may go this route. The trigger on my new rifle is set up with a stiff first stage. In rapid fire because I'm so out of practice I'm pulling right through the first stage into the second and busting the shot.

Regards

Jim
 

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Be careful with milking the trigger in rapid fire...

A loose position can result (pretty easily) in a second shot breaking without really being aimed at all.... resulting in quite the test of your natural point of aim.

Seriously, though - holding back through recoil, then releasing just enough to hear (or more properly feel the click before squeezing that second shot may seem like an efficient trigger technique, but I'd put forth the notion that all of your shots should use the same trigger technique... be it rapid, offhand, or slowfire. The amount of time saved by milking is practically nil. The danger of a recoil-induced second shot is real, and in my opinion the deviation from a carefully and methodically engaged trigger technique isn't worth the "benefit."

But then again, that's just my opinion. Shoot how ya like. MCORPS1
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
B 2/75

Know what you mean re: a second shot breaking without really being aimed at all

First time I tried this was a sitting string in a leg match at Camp Atterbury IN.

I did the partial release on the trigger too soon - had not stopped rocking from recoil. Put the round into the safety berm in front of the pits. Sounded like a slow motion slam fire/double. My scorekeeper thought it was a double and asked if I wanted an alibi.

Minus 10 points right out of the chute. No leg points that day.

The trigger on my new rifle is very different from the one I used when I was really into the game. The 2nd stage letoff is the best I ever shot but the 1st stage is heavy. This is not an issue in slow fire but it's causing me grief in rapid. I caught my self pulling right through the 1st and 2nd stages without pause because it's hard to tell when stage 1 is over.

If you do this right it eliminates one step in the process (taking up the slack). Just verify picture/alignment, apply a little pressure and away it goes.

I've been out of this for years so this is like starting over. Could be I've just forgot how to shoot a 2 stage trigger.

Regards

Jim
 

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I don't "milk" or really do anything fancy with trigger manipulation during RF. I just do the same thing I do with SF only faster. After breaking the shot, I let the trigger go all the way back out. At the tail end of the recoil, I take my breath and as I exhale, I take up the slack on the trigger. When the front post settles where I want it, I rapidly, but smoothly, squeeze out the last stage. If you try to really get sophisticated on your trigger manipulation, you'll find yourself worrying about it too much during the string of fire. You want everything to be as natural as possible to make your muscular movements automatic. Your concious focus needs to stay on your front sight.

Key to good RF scores with the M1a is position. If your position doesn't start out good, you will only get worse as you progress through your string of fire.
 

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Rifleman's cadence, an accurately aimed shot down range every 3-4 seconds, in other words every breath. Trigger control means squeezing and follow though by holding it back. You're at your natural respiratory pause at the bottom of your breath, shot breaks, hold her back, as you breathe in relax the trigger just till it resets, no more. As you breathe out tighten up the squeeze so it breaks as you hit your respiratory pause, repeat in nice smooth rhythm every 3-4 seconds. If position and steady hold factors are good, if NPOA is good, reaquisition is automatic and moot point.......O.L.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
KYShooter

I used traditional trigger control in my first life. Since I'm starting over thought I'd wet my finger, stick it in the air and see which way the winds blowing on milking the trigger.

Does not appear to have much support so far.

Regards

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Xsail

Sounds like you "milk" the trigger in RF?

Regards

Jim
 

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"Sounds like you "milk" the trigger in RF?"

Don't know the definition of "milk", even in SF, I fire all shots RF, might take a break between some but breaking that rhythm is asking for flyers...O.L.
 

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I'm curious as to how many Service Rifle shooters "milk" the trigger in rapid fire?

That is to hold the trigger to the rear after a shot until sight picture/alignment has been reaquired. Then release the trigger just enough to allow it to reset without going back into the first trigger stage, in essence making it act like a single stage trigger.

Regards

Jim

Right, you only have first-stage take-up for the first shot of a string unless you run into trouble. That's how it was coached when we started out with old DCM-loaner Garands. Now, there's no law sez you have to do it that way, some good shooters prefer to release the trigger between shots. Wind and daylight conditions, too, can influence how you manage this. If you need a few seconds to adjust, it's less stressful to release the trigger, catch breath, re-acquire sight picture, resume firing than to give your index finger the cramps or try to mess with the windage knob.
 

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Milking is the only thing I've ever heard it called. But I don't think it was commonly used in my neck of the woods.


Jim

When Milking the trigger you are actually doing the opposite of what you are talking about.
You dont pull the trigger all the way to rear hard. If it is pulled lightly (not all the way through) the recoil of the rifle can cause it to double. This happens with newbies firing off the bench
 

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It took some practice but I "taught" myself to inhale, exhale, pull the trigger, hold the trigger back, inhale, release the trigger to the point were it resets (after the inhale), then start all over again with the exhale/pull trigger, etc. This doesn't mean I fire at every exhale, it just means I'm ready to if needed.

Now I do it whether standing/sitting/prone without thinking about it.
 
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