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Milk cow or a milking goat.
In a location where I could have a cow would be great as long as food was there.
A goat in most shtf would provide milk could be used for packing and would eat
most anything that there is to eat while traveling larger goats can pack needed
supplies and provide needed meat for eating. If bugging in a cow, If on the move a small group of goats.
http://www.theprairiehomestead.com/2014/03/family-milk-cow.html
 

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Honestly, unless you have a large group (say an entire town, or dozen families or so) cattle isn't worth the work. They generally require a large grazing area, need atleast a year to get to a good butchering or breeding size, and will require plenty of manpower to provide protection from predators (2 or 4 legged). Not to mention trying to preserve that much meat for only one or two families can be quite time consuming, pulling away from harvesting and other duties.

Goats on the other hand require less land, can be ready for slaughter in a few months, can be easily rotated through pasture with only a couple people, and depending on size can be eaten in just a few meals with minimal work.

Granted, I wouldn't rely on one single source of meat, but goats, rabbits, and chickens are fairly low maintenance and can provide much more over the short and long term.
 

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This has been discussed here several times in the past. Which is going to be easier to to handle, a milk goat at under 100lbs or a 1,000lb milk cow?

A goat isn't susceptible to the many things that will kill a cow like a flipped stomach. And some people that are lactate intolerant can drink goat milk.

Goat or cow will only produce for a year before it will dry up. At that time it needs bred. So, are you going to maintain a 2,000lb bull or a 100lb billy?

Figuring maintaining 1,000lbs of something to produce milk, you could have 10 milk goats & one billy. Breed 5 goats summer & 5 winter. That will ensure fresh milk year round. The billy needs secured very well year round. But alot easier to restrain then a bull.

Most goats give birth to 2 or 3 kids. Males are castrated at 2-4 weeks old. All get their horns burned at 4-8 weeks old. Males can be slaughtered at 6 months & get about half their weight in meat. Each 50lb 6mo male you slaughter you can figure about 25lbs of meat.
But even figuring losses with females, you can gain 80% of your herd size per year. That is great barter material. So is your excess milk & cheese made from the excess milk.The old or young can be used to maintain the herd of goats allowing your prime work force for more important things.
 

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Think of the bible & the young boys used to maintain the sheep & goat herds. Young boys like David.

I got a crash course on goats once from a friend's friend. You only have to milk a goat once a day. But if you milk twice a day you will get 10-20% more milk. With several goats that will definately add up in milk production. But I had covered this before.
 

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1/2-3/4 gallon per day from nubian goats. But remember that there is a 2-3 month period when they will dry up & have to be bred. A billy can service 20 females. So figuring maintaining your herd at 20 females that would be 10 gallons of milk per day. Alpine gives more average milk then a nubian. Either are good keepers. Its about what you can get locally to get started with.

That goat's milk is great barter. Milk for drinking or for any chesse or soap makers. Give them the milk & get a certain amount of cheese or soap in return.

Goat's milk doesn't have the fat content cow's milk has so doesn't have the storage length cow's milk has.
 

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Also goats milk can be used to supplement breast feeding for newborns. Good if any issues come up.
 
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I'm reminded of a very funny book from the 1980s called "Real Vermonters Don't Milk Goats." For many of us from dairy country, goats are very new age-ish hippie commune stuff. And to me personally, everything edible that comes from a goat tastes like the goat's armpit. But the remarks seen here are something to think about and I'm sure I'd get used to goat if I ate it all the time.
 

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Any meat tastes like what its been fed. That is the reason for trapping wild hog. Feed them corn for two weeks then slaughter. If you just shoot them they will probably taste like acorns.
If goats are eating crap (weeds) their milk & meat will taste like it. But then too, when milking the goats they should get a nice mix of grain to eat keeping them occupied while milking plus ensuring quality milk.

Most of the world does goat milk because goats are easier to handle.
 

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60-65% of the world uses goat milk. Most of the cow milk is consumed in North America. That also includes things like cheeses, ice cream, cream cheese, etc.
 

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i would try some goat milk first, it is strong, i do not like it.
the big thing with goats is worms, they need to be wormed often or they will die.
also where you live, the south where you get 1 cow per 1 acre or west where it is 1 cow per 35 acres.
 

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I have both, and the cow is way less trouble than the goats (2), but then I'm on a cattle ranch and not a goat farm. I'm already set up for cattle, and none of my fences are adequate for goats. I shouldn't say me, I have a wife and four daughters who deal with the goats, and for them it is fun. I would say that for most people, goats would be the way to go, easier to transport, more readily divisible, etc. I just asked the wife and she said goats all the way for most survival situations. When the goats came home, I figured they'd get out and run off, well, they got out of course, but they came straight to the house to look up the girls. Our cow is very gentle and lets the girls climb all over her, but she doesn't entertain the girls like the goats do. I don't have or want a billy around, so they'll probably arrange to drop the ladies off at a neighbors who has a billy when the time comes.
 

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Another thing a lot of people don't realize, having a male nearby will taint goats milk. When nursing, try to keep them seperate.

I prefer beef over goat, but for limited land goats are a much better option.

That being said, we're planning on eventually getting a few Scottish Highlands. They're smaller cattle (800-1000lb usually) but can survive quite well on goat terrain and smaller plots. But that's likely 8-10yrs down the road if everything goes on schedule.
 

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With both of us in our 60s its just easier on us to store plenty of powdered milk. But goats would be our choice.
 

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In an earlier thread about milk, I was regretting that UHT whole milk which, before it was opened, could be stored on the shelf without refrigeration, had been taken off the market (although the system is used for things like cream). In the supermarket yesterday, I noticed that soy milk as well as almond milk is stored unrefrigerated on the shelf just like the UHT was, so that might be the way to go if something tasty is wanted (well... sort of tasty). I'm going to be looking into it more but I assume the nutrition must be similar or they wouldn't be touting it as a substitute for the lactose intolerant. Another possibility is that the UHT cream might not actually need refrigeration before being opened- reading about the milk, they believe the idea of warm milk storage just freaked people out and they didn't even want to try it.
 

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Whenever I drink milk, it's SHT bowel in 60 minutes.
We are naturally supposed to be lactose intolerant. It's a trigger to stop breast feeding. Some Eastern European flawed gene changed that for us Europeans some time back, hence why you rarely find an Asian that can drink milk as an adult. The gene never worked its way over.

Today, I start a old program I used to follow:

No milk (half and half ok in coffee, no lactose)
No sugar
No yeast

Back to weight training. No squatting though. Two herniated disks are making sure of that. Good thing is I have my 14 year old son to spot me since he has started lifting for football.

Sorry for hijacking Hawk.
 

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1/2-3/4 gallon per day from nubian goats. But remember that there is a 2-3 month period when they will dry up & have to be bred. A billy can service 20 females. So figuring maintaining your herd at 20 females that would be 10 gallons of milk per day. Alpine gives more average milk then a nubian. Either are good keepers. Its about what you can get locally to get started with.

That goat's milk is great barter. Milk for drinking or for any chesse or soap makers. Give them the milk & get a certain amount of cheese or soap in return.

Goat's milk doesn't have the fat content cow's milk has so doesn't have the storage length cow's milk has.
Isent grazing goats a lot easier too? Dont they feed off pretty much anything besides lead and granite? lol

Theres a guy in my area that raises "pack goats". Trains them, and sells them. I guess they can carry up to 50lbs of weight and do just fine in the mountains. And you can eat them. Kind of got me thinking.
 

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Goats can be used around the homestead for work. Ever heard of a goat cart? Its where I got my idea for the the carts for my rotties. Use the goats & carts to move lighter loads of water, feed, firewood, etc.
 
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