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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings everyone! I've searched around but I cannot find anything that quite explains the questions I have regarding the markings on the elevation knob on my M1A.

There is a prominent M on the knob which I take to mean it is marked for meters. The numbers go in sequence: 2, 4, 6, 8. There is also an S and an A. There is also a marking that looks like an 11 but looks more like a pair of arrows to me. I've searched around on various websites and I've only encountered folks who have some but not all of the exact markings on mine.

If there is anyone who can shed some light on this subject, I would be most grateful. If pictures would help, please let me know. Thanks everyone!
 

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From Lee Emerson's (Different) research. The "M" denotes meters 2,4,6,8,11 for 200, 400, 600 etc. The "SA" is Springfield Armory. Hope thats helps.

The following companies made non-match USGI M14 rear sight elevation and windage knobs in the 1960s. The M14 elevation knob was marked with "M" to denote in calibration in meters. This is an item of ongoing research for me. As I learn more, I'll update this.

Elevation knob and pinion assembly

Druge Brothers - DRC
Frazier Manufacturing - FZR, made in 1962
Globe Union - made in 1962, possibly later
New Haven Clock - NHC, made for TRW and in 1965 as replacement spare
Springfield Armory - made in 1959, possibly later
Wico Electric - WCE, made for H&R and TRW and in 1969 as replacement spares

Windage knob assembly

Bruce Machine and Engineering - BME, made for Springfield Armory
Druge Brothers - DRC, made for TRW
Frazier Manufacturing - FZR
Stewart Iron Works - SWK
Weather Manufacturing - W inside a hexagon
Wico Electric - WCE, made for TRW
Wright Manufacturing - HRA-W, made for H&R
Wright Manufacturing - WRIGHT, made for TRW
 

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I shot my new standard model rifle today. At 100 yards I hit to the right about 3 1/2 inches. I turned it Left and went 10 clicks. It moved like 10 inches. 2 rounds went off the paper. Went Right 5 clicks and still not centered added 2 more and it is good. So I thought a click was 1/2 an inch? Or am I wrong? Thanks in advance.
 

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The clicks are 1" at 100 yards. They are not always perfectly in tune with point of impact. Advisable to perform half corrections and a feel for the sight adjustment. Also how well your rifle is indexed influences sight adjustment prescision. Not so much at 100 yards though. Not unheard of. Sometimes with a certain ammo one click takes me 3-4 MOA.
 

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The clicks are 1" at 100 yards. They are not always perfectly in tune with point of impact. Advisable to perform half corrections and a feel for the sight adjustment. Also how well your rifle is indexed influences sight adjustment prescision. Not so much at 100 yards though. Not unheard of. Sometimes with a certain ammo one click takes me 3-4 MOA.
1 inch- got it. You are right at 1 inch it is very possible they will not always be perfectly in tune with point of impact. Thanks for the information! Very helpful.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I've noticed that there is a hash mark preceding the 2 on the knob. Is that really a 100m mark?
 

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My elevation knob has 2 number 2’s then 3,4,5,6,etc. why are there two 2’s and where should I set my 100 yard zero?
 

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My elevation knob has 2 number 2’s then 3,4,5,6,etc. why are there two 2’s and where should I set my 100 yard zero?
You probably have a Garand knob. The other "2" is a 12. There are no odd numbers, so the line between your 2's is the 100 yd mark.
 

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Zero the sight at 100 yards or meters and loosen the screw on the elevation knob without changing the aperture setting. Move the knob until the 100 meter mark lines up with the notch on the receiver ear and tighten the screw. Record the number of clicks required for known ranges in a log book and use those settings when adjusting for distance. Ignore the numbers.
 
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