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Linda uses part of my workshop for her molten glass manipulation. The glass is at about 1700 degs when it starts to flow. What she does is control the speed and movement of the string as it comes out of a container of shards that are placed just so within the suspended kilns. Not something normal people would be doing when the outside temperature is 92, but then, no one ever accused us of being normal. These stringers will be cut and used in some of her glass artwork in her studio.


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Discussion Starter #3
When the stringer first starts out of the kiln it is glowing a very bright white hot.
 

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Now Art, thats pretty cool! Take some pictures of her finished work.

REN
 

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Seeing that glass straw reminds me of the 'soda straws' at Luray Caverns VA....
 

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Wow awesome works of art, thanks for posting photos
 

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Nice artwork, please pass on our amazement of her talent!! -Lloyd 🍻
 

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Nice artwork, please pass on our amazement of her talent!! -Lloyd 🍻
I conveyed your thoughts to her this morning. She was out stacking and splitting wood at 06:30.
 

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That's nice stuff. How / where is it sold?
Also does she hire out for firewood chores?😁
 

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Thanks, She sells at a number of venues throughout the Northeast such as art associations and a couple of times a year a studio sale here.
The firewood detail is reserved.
 

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Working with glass is pretty cool. Took an elective class in glassblowing in school. Even in January, the shed was pretty warm. A little different from fusing it. Really enjoyed it.
There are some great videos from the Corning Museum on YouBoob. They can run a fairly long time, but it's neat to watch the manipulation. They even show some lampwork.
 

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I've always wanted to try my hand at this kind of glass work; but didn't have a good place to set up as a workshop, nor did I want to have to buy all the equipment. I'll stick to the occasional leaded glass pieces I do, either as gifts or on consignment.
 
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