M14 Forum banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,500 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know where I can find magnified shooting glasses?
I'm not looking for bifocal shooting glasses but the whole lense. I dont need much just 1or 1.5 magnification
Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,271 Posts
There are not any glasses that will give a useable magnified view of the target or the front sight.

For seeing a rifle's post front sight and the target reasonably well you need glasses that have their 'best vision' for about 2-times the distance from your eye to the front sight.

If your prescription is strong, then using reglar 'street glasses' is more difficult.
Special 'shooting frames' are better since the placement of the lense can be adjusted for best seeing.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,500 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well I dont have actual glasses, although I do need them. I use "cheater reading glasses" now as I cant afford the real thing right now. Can see well at distance.
Dont feel cheap reading glasses are a safe alternative for shooting glasses and was looking for something to get me by until I can afford prescription shooting glasses
Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,271 Posts
Try a pair of low power reading glasses - perhaps around +1.5 diopter strength. That might be enough to sharpen the front post and still give decent seeing of the target, or maybe 1/2 the power of what you need for actual reading.
They won't magnify the target but should sharpen the focus.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
 

·
Eye Master
Joined
·
4,121 Posts
If you can see distance fine, the power you need to bring in the front sight is about +0.5 diopters for an M-1A. Reading glasses start at 1.25 (occasionally you can find 1.0), which is too strong.

The best option if you are concerned about safety is a BJones lens insert in your rear sight hood, so you drop in a +0.5 lens, then use regular safety glasses. Unfortunately, if you don't have a hooded rear aperture, there isn't a great solution to mounting the lens on a regular aperture. I heard of someone using a small piece of shrink tubing with some holes punched in it, but don't know how reliable that is.

Art
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
I strongly suggest you get a prescription for shooting. Wearing "Readers / Cheaters" may be OK for reading but there is no substitute for having corrected vision when you're shooting.

Check-out this page for Shooting Glasses Frames. http://www.bjonessights.com/glasses.html I have tried to explain things in lay terms but I can also be reached by telephone. 602-803-8300.

To date, I have sold about 300 frames and I have many customers with multiple frames.

I can also make "Magnifier Glasses" for those just entering there 40th summer..... vision challenges usually start at 40.

..bjonessights..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
971 Posts
I am fortunate enough to have a eye doctor who understands shooting. When my vision deteriorated to the point that I was having problem with the focus on the front sight, he had me show him about where I held the weapon and approximately the measurement from my hand to the front sight. Then he worked on my correction so that I had a special set of glasses which were for shooting. In my case they were not as strong as my non shooting glasses. It was a challenge to see the target but my front sight was crystal clear. For rifle shooting with iron there is no fix in my case because I can't see the target past about 50 yards. So for rifle I went to a scope for everything.

However, I recently had to go through 30 hyperbaric treatments due to cancer/radiation therapy on my throat 13 years ago. In doing that I had to breath oxygen at a pressure depth of 50 feet for 2 hours. One of the biproducts of that treatment is your vision changes radically and the complete change doesn't manifest itself for several months so they warn you about it. My distance vision was improved so well that I can now shoot out to about 300 yards with iron on my M1A. There are several scientific papers that describe the phenominon and it is something that happens to all who wear prescription lenses in that kind of treatment. Only the degree differs. How long it lasts is anyones guess as there have been no studies that have looked at that. The drawback is that unless you need hyperbarics which is for revascularizing bone that has been damaged by radiation among other things, it is not covered by medical insurance. 30 treatments which were covered by my insurance came to over $52000. So it's not something you can just opt to do, unless you have more money than God.
 

·
Eye Master
Joined
·
4,121 Posts
When you get a lens to help you shoot, you do not want a lens that will focus on the front sight, or you will lose the target. Based on optical math, the correct balance is to get one that will focus you at 2x the distance to the front sight. That will help the front sight, without giving up too much target.

Tell your eye doc you want to focus at the 'hyperfocal' distance of the front sight.

Art
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
2/75, et-al, the glasses you mention are good for seeing the objects needed to acquire a sight picture.... but they afford little to no protection to the user.

The BJones Glasses offer vision correction for specific needs in many different types of shooting. Rifle, pistol, shotgun, stationary, moving, different positions, and PROTECTION from not just the users gun but from the neighbors gun as well.

And the BJones glasses are affordable. Numerous customers have multiple frames with different color/power combination's for different conditions.

..bjones..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
399 Posts
I heard of someone using a small piece of shrink tubing with some holes punched in it, but don't know how reliable that is.

Art
That was probably me. I've been using a BJones lens insert installed on a USGI aperture with heat shrink for the past year and find it works quite well. I've worked out most of the gotchas and would be happy to post instructions if anyone is interested.
 

·
Rest in Peace
Joined
·
2,058 Posts
When I hit 40, I had to get reading glasses to see up close. My main shooting problems were seeing the front sight (not so bad with a rifle but really bad with a pistol) and seeing my scope/rear sight adjustments when I lift my head off the stock. This would also apply to reading a data card for long-range scope use.

About 15 years ago I got some little stick-on lens dots at the local Walgreens. They are 'reading glass' lenses that stick on another pair of glasses. They are soft, flexible pieces of plastic that attach to another lens with just water. They can be cut down to whatever size or shape you need. You can remove them just by tugging on them and they leave no residue.

I customized two sets of shooting glasses using these little dots - one for pistol and one for scope/rear sight - and they work like a charm. The only trick is putting them in a spot where they are in line with the sight but don't get in the way for seeing everything else.

I recently lost one of these little dots - it had stayed stuck on my shooting glasses all of these years but finally fell off. They don't carry them in most stores anymore but I ordered a new set from stickonlenses.com for less than $20. The brand name is Optx-20/20. Just like reading glasses, they come in various strengths.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
399 Posts

·
Eye Master
Joined
·
4,121 Posts
Nice job. I think I see what you did, but let me make sure:

The cylinder of the shrink tubing is oriented vertically, and you punched a horizontal hole for the aperture opening. Is that correct?

The other option would be to orient the shrink tubing horizontal (so the two ends become the hole you are looking through), and you have to punch a hole on the bottom for the parture to fit in, but I think this option would be more difficult to do.

Art
 

·
Eye Master
Joined
·
4,121 Posts
Nice job. I think I see what you did, but let me make sure:

The cylinder of the shrink tubing is oriented vertically, and you punched a horizontal hole for the aperture opening. Is that correct?

The other option would be to orient the shrink tubing horizontal (so the two ends become the hole you are looking through), and you have to punch a hole on the bottom for the parture to fit in, but I think this option would be more difficult to do.

Art
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top