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Discussion Starter · #5 ·

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Does the liner add anything for the macmillian?
You don’t need a stock liner, you will have to bed the receiver to the stock. Epoxy the receiver to the stock. Unless of course you want to use a Brookfield Stock Liner, but good luck finding one!

MORE THAN A HOBBY, A PASSION!
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Don't forget about the front ferrule.
 

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The holes will most likely need to be drilled and a nut plate bedded into the forearm. Your gunsmith will most likely have to drill the hole under the buttplate going all the way to the rear swivel. And the top screw hole for the buttplate.

Tony.
 

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occius, The comments above stating "no liner needed" could be confusing to someone who has never owned a McMillan M1A/M14 stock. To clarify, the Mc stock is not designed to accept a liner. They are designed (required) to be bedded to an individual rifle.
The exception is the XM 25 sniper rifle. The stocks used were still "not designed" to accept a liner, rather they were "modified" to accept the Brookfield Precision Tool steel liner.
 

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I think the point is made, but in essence, unlike a wood M14 stock, the McMillan M1A competition fiberglass stock is extremely thick at the sidewalls, and based on its layered fiberglass construction - it is extremely stiff. Wood will slightly flex and compress upon recoil, so the metal M14 stock liner gives it some additional strength, but in the McMillan, that M14 liner is not needed. The action is bedded to the stiff stock itself. The arrows point to the thickness of this area. The dark grey bedding is also seen on this picture as an fyi. In this case it was done in an very clean and well executed manner.
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I think the point is made, but in essence, unlike a wood M14 stock, the McMillan M1A competition fiberglass stock is extremely thick at the sidewalls, and based on its layered fiberglass construction - it is extremely stiff. Wood will slightly flex and compress upon recoil, so the medal M14 stock liner gives it some additional strength, but in the McMillan, that M14 liner is not needed. The action is bedded to the stiff stock itself. The arrows point to the thickness of this area. The dark grey bedding is also seen on this picture as an fyi. In this case it was done in an very clean and well executed manner.
View attachment 491826
Thanks! This makes a lot more sense now! Appreciate the knowledge share!
 

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I think the point is made, but in essence, unlike a wood M14 stock, the McMillan M1A competition fiberglass stock is extremely thick at the sidewalls, and based on its layered fiberglass construction - it is extremely stiff. Wood will slightly flex and compress upon recoil, so the medal M14 stock liner gives it some additional strength, but in the McMillan, that M14 liner is not needed. The action is bedded to the stiff stock itself. The arrows point to the thickness of this area. The dark grey bedding is also seen on this picture as an fyi. In this case it was done in an very clean and well executed manner.
View attachment 491826
I read thru all the posts with the eyes of a newbie and info could be misread.( Semantics, yes, I know.)
PS, not sure what a medal liner for the M14 is, but do know what a metal liner is.:eek:😀
 
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