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I have a new SAI M1A and I would like to know how to properly zero this rifle. I have shot the rifle to test fire it at 50 yard and it seems to hit pretty close to my point of aim but I would like to really dial it in once I get a chance. And also how do I reset the sight drum to the 200 yard mark after I am done with the sighting in? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

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The NM rifles with heavy barrel / heavy stock held close to the same zero for me regardless of position and whether the barrel was cold or hot.

With a standard weight barrel and stock this may not be the case. Sling tension can shift the point of impact.

If you plan to shoot prone and sitting with a sling you ought to zero it that way. Carefully shoot at least a ten shot group and locate the center. Adjust the sight to center the group and shoot again. If you can, plot your hits to determine if the barrel is "walking" as it heats up during the string.

With standard sights 1 click is approximately 1 MOA which is about one inch change in point of impact per each hundred yards.

You move a rear sight in the same direction you want to move the point of impact.

When satisfied with the zero, run the elevation down to the bottom, count and record the clicks. Turn the windage knob until the movable witness mark on the sight base lines up with the center mark on the fixed wind gage on the receiver. Count and record the clicks and whether it was right or left of center.

The elevation at the bottom and wind gage centered are referred to as "mechanical zero" settings. Actual sight settings are referenced from these points - example: 200 YD / PRONE / ELV = 10 / WND = 5R. This means elevation is 10 clicks up from the bottom and windage is 5 clicks right of the center.

Record the: (1) range (2) position (3) # of elevation clicks up from zero and (4) # of windage clicks right or left from zero on a slip of paper and tape it inside the flip up butt plate.

With a 100 yd zero you can use published "come-up" data to estimate the elevation settings for longer ranges.

At 200 yds it takes a pretty good wind to move a .30 cal much but beyond there you need to compensate. Put your basic windage zero on the rifle then based on the wind speed and direction you add right or left windage.

Regards

Jim
 

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NMC_EXP,
Nice post. Something else I like to do is adjust the front sight to make a no-wind zero the actual rifle center. Witness marks line up. Also use a paint pen or nail polish to highlight the rifles' mechanical zero.
Good advice on keeping a data book. Having past information at hand has saved me on numerous occasions.

David
 

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NMC_EXP,
Nice post. Something else I like to do is adjust the front sight to make a no-wind zero the actual rifle center. Witness marks line up. Also use a paint pen or nail polish to highlight the rifles' mechanical zero.
Good advice on keeping a data book. Having past information at hand has saved me on numerous occasions.

David
I adjusted my front sights so mechanical zero was actual no wind zero. That can be a slow and frustrating procedure but it's worth the effort.

Painting zero stripes is an excellent practice. My close in vision started going away and it was tough to see the windage vernier scale. I even put a stripe on the hood.

Thanks for the additional info.

Jim
 

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+1
Getting old is a #itch.

David
I wish I'd started shooting sooner.

I was 35 when I shot my first match and my eyes went at 40 (thats my excuse and I'm sticking to it).

Ventilated thousands of tin cans in the 34 years prior but nothing serious.

Sheesh.

Regards

Jim
 

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Tip for the OP.
Be sure to count the clicks and record both for windage and elevation. I have found these to be the best way to maintain first round hits .

Jim, I to started a little late but I'm going down swinging.
'Old age and treachery to overcome youth and good eyes.'

David
 
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