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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello all,

Im new to this forum, but have found it to be a wealth of knowledge pertaining not only to the greatest battle rifle ever made, but other interesting topics as well. Let me just start off by saying, Ive got a lot of respect and admiration for Vietnam War vets, especially my infantry breatheren be you Army or Marine. We are fighting the same kind of war today, except you guys got the raw end of the deal when you got home and thats just plain wrong.

I am an Army Infantry combat veteren, I served in combat with 1 BCT, 2/327 Infantry Reg, 101st Airborne Division HHC Sniper section. Our MTOE slots us in the bat. HQ scout platoon, so we work side by side with the battallion scouts. As a shooter in this section I had access to the standard M24 SWS and the M107 Barret (dont get me started on that loud obnoxious, heavy beast). These two booms sticks are what I took into country with me, along with my M4 and M9 sidearm. Rolling all this crap through Kuwait, then onto COB Speicher, then trickling down via CH-47 to FOB Brassfield-Mora, then finally covoying out to our tiny Patrol Base, PB Olson just on the edge of a little town called Samarra, Iraq.

At this time in 2007 the 82nd Airborne was having a hard time containing the insurgency in this town and were sustaining substantial losses. AQI controlled this town from the bottom up, and most of the IP and IA were corrupt or bought off. The town, especially west of the mid-point (40th st) was heavily saturated with EIDs, and complex attacks were almost assured if static for more than 5 min.

OUR task was IED reduction and hunting these groups that would look for US. Small Kill Teams were the order of the day, conventional sniper operations were out the window- you needed the support of at least 2-4 other guys in the city, a crew served was always handy. Well anyway, the short comings of the M24 in urban operations became apparent during our first engagement which lasted over 4 hours against an overwhelimg force. Thank God for QRF. One thing that sucked was, although my bolt gun was accurate and i could put rounds downrange quickly- i needed to be able to lay down scunion quickly, from the usually short exposure time of the enemy, to stopping vehicles. An auto loader was in order- and the M107 was too damn heavy to be useful. You were useless in the streets with this stick, and it was prone to malfunction, was unweildly, and ammunition was very heavy. Dont get me wrong, the 107 has its place, but not for fluid combat operations. (sadly, most commanders hear the word "barret" and they want it used...."Sir, i CAN stop a vehicle with 7.62.... PROMISE)

Enter the M14. Most of our 14s in the arms rooms were rack grade, mostly old reissue weapons made in the 60's. I took them up on the roof (had a nice little 800M range off the roop top on the tigris, another advantage to being away from The Brass at a small PB). Testing of over 10 rifles, only 2 were 1 MOA rifles. Working with the armorer and tinkering around we assembled a rifle that shot just a hair over 1 MOA- a winchester reciever and some other parts. properly headspaced. Stuck a leupuold M3A and a ARMS mount on her and boom- now we have an autoloader. Stuck a sage stock on her and she gave me good service for a good while. Stopped vehicles (usually by destroying the navagational piloting device and any other adjacent units within the vehicle.... if you catch my drift).

She served me well, but one day upon a trip to the big COB i was raiding the company arms room and I found an M14 NM- TRW i believe. She shot very well, and she became my new stick. I made friends with an ODA team and they let me borrow their SR-25 from time to time, only advantage being that it had a can- but ive always loved the M14. Never a failier to fire, goes bang every time and she always put my rounds where they were supposed to go. More importantly, 7.62 hardly ever needs a followup shot. 175 grains in the right place doesent leave a whole lot of room for nagotiation on the part of haadji (er, i mean a male of arabic decent between the ages of 16 and 48 with possible hostile intentions)

This rifle will always be near and dear to my heart. Whenever I pick one up, im reminded of those rough days in a place where we made a difference, fought, closed with and destroyed the enemy- took the fight to the enemy and won. I also feel the history of this distinguished rifle, and I feel apart of something greater.


This photo was during a cheesy overwatch mission for the theater commander who wanted to come and poke his head out and see the Golden Mosque. Thats a Navy EOD bomb dog used to sweep the building for the old man. Wish i could have taken the dog AND the M14NM home with me!

Thanks for reading.

Drill Sergeant Chris K. DI2 CIB3
US Army (now im a reservist)
 

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Glad you made it home.

Ain't it amazing how a rifle that was designed more than 50 years ago and has been maligned by all kinds of desk jocks and "I think I know it alls" keeps being brought back in to service by the guys who make the rubber meet the road. The thing just works better than just about anything else when it comes to knocking down bad guys. Don't get me wrong, I think that ARs and other newer designs have their place and are superior in some ways but with the M14 I know that I can punch through walls with an AP round and still get that shooter behind it. And if I want to I can put a lot rounds in that hole in the wall and make it a bigger hole for my brothers to exploit. The rifle is just an unstoppable beast that sure makes you feel more confident that you will be able to walk out of the feces afterwards.

Thanks for serving...doggy...DI5 MCORPS1...I couldn't pass it up!!
 

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Awesome testimony to the M14. She will see duty whereever the need takes her. Again as stated before thank you for your service and welcome aboard.DI2
 

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Great write up, good read. Thank you for your service, I will never forget what guys like you do for us. Just don't have the opportunity to thank each and every one of you in person.
 

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SGT of Marines
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Thanks for the story, and thanks for your service. Welcome to the forum and WELCOME HOME.
 

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Thanks for your service, Chris, thanks for the story, and most importantly, . . . welcome home.

Now you know why some days I go to my safe, just look in on her. No need to go shooting, . . . just look in.

May God bless,
Dwight NAV1
 

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"Death From Above"
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Great story indeed! Welcome to the forum brother and welcome home. Oh and thanks for helping out the boys in the eighty duce.
 

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Thanks for your testimony of the grand ol' gal, and for your service!
 

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Thank you for that great account of such a fine battle rifle. Thank you as well for your service. We appreciate your courage.
 

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175grs Of Love
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Welcome Home Brother ... sounds very similiar to Ramadi in 06 when we were out IED hunting. We worked with a lot of SKT teams (insertions and S2 sharing) and they never left home without there 14's. I would have gladly traded my M4 for a 14 if I could have laid hands on one. Glad you made it home safe GI7

Loved your Haadji definition ...
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Thanks

Alright, found the edit button so i could insert pictures, so i included one with my previous story. Thanks for the kind words all, I appreciate it. here is a picture of me and my spotter at our range outside the big fob getting dope on our makeshift EBR M14, this was my first stick. We gathered dope out to 1100 meters! By this point it was an area weapon, but still held inside the area of a bongo truck door (about 2-3 MOA) which was outstanding for this old gal in a sage stock!





-Drill Sergeant K. CIB3
 

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Thank you and welcome aboard!

"The United States Army is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for land-based military operations. It is the largest and oldest established branch of the U.S. military, and is one of seven uniformed services. The modern Army has its roots in the Continental Army which was formed on 14 June 1775, before the establishment of the United States, to meet the demands of the American Revolutionary War. Congress officially created the United States Army on 3 June 1784 after the end of the war to replace the disbanded Continental Army. The Army considers itself to be descended from the Continental Army and thus dates its inception from the origins of that force."

From: Wikipedia FRG1
 

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Great read and a heartfelt thanks! (dog nut here also)
 

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wow....what a couple of initial posts! As stated above thanks for your service and welcome home. Its great to hear about the M14 from those using it in battle.
 

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Rest in Peace
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Thank you for your service & welcome home.

The M14 is a reliable workhorse & always will be. No matter what the configuration, there is still nothing like the feel of a wood & steel one.

HuntingHawk
 
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