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Hi all,

I'm getting ready to store my M14 (classic wood stock) for a long period of time. Unfortunately, the place I'm living is relatively humid (average 60% during dry season), so I've decided to keep my M14 in an air-tight pelican-storm case, taken out all the foams, because foams attract moist, and replaced with a water resistant hardigg fieldpak, and throw in a few desiccant silica gel. I've tested it with a humidity sensor for a few days now, and I'm a little concern because it is slightly too dry in there...

I've read an article somewhere, I couldn't find it now, but it says something about the optimal humidity to store your firearms. I think it's 40-50%, and that covers all kinds of metals, timber and plastic. The sensor inside the hard case shows 36% RH, it doesn't change regardless of the outside RH variation (55%-65%). While the steel parts should be no problem, I afraid that the wood stock might be damaged under 40% RH over time. Can someone please confirm this for me? Your advice is greatly appreciated.
 

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How "long term" are we talking? If you're not going to be able/aren't able to routinely oil the rifle...and given the high level of humidity you have to deal with, you may have to take the approach that Uncle Sam used to take. This would be bathing the rifle in something similar to cosmoline. That practically guarantees the lowest level of corrosion possible.
 

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You might consider vacuum sealing your barreled action with a desiccant pack, and doing the same for the stock.
 
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Yup, if it were years, I would soak it in CLP or a preservative oil and wrap it in plastic wrap, then vacuum seal it. For the stock, I'd vacuumj seal it with a dessicant pack inside. There is also poly gun bags:

http://www.polygunbag.com/gunbags.html

Tony.
 

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do like the Governments do, drown it in Cosmoline or something similar and seal it up
 

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The government now stores most weapons dry in vacuum bags. If it's in a wood stock I'd recommend either taking it out of the stock or at least opening the trigger guard to prevent wood compression. If you oil the metal, don't get oil on the wood. Cosmoline will work too, but the same precausions apply.
 
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I have put my wood stocked early 90's Springfield M1A-A1 Bush Rifle in storage for both 4-year and 5-year periods in a high humidity climate without any ill effects by stripping all oil & grease off the metal and wiping down the wood, then lightly -- but thoroughly -- coating all metal and wood surfaces (inside and out) with Johnsons paste wax, including in bore. After reassembling the waxed rifle with the trigger guard inserted but not fully locked down, I wrapped it tightly in multiple layers of saran wrap, then mummy-wrapped it in duct tape, then secured it a non-climate controlled gun safe. When I brought the rifle out of storage I removed the wax from the metal by warming the metal lightly over a coleman one-burner camping stove and wiping off the softened wax. I used my bare hand to rub the wax off/into the wood stock. Although this method takes some time, I had NO corrosion on any metal surface and the wood was not harmed by oil or grease -- at the range, the rifle functioned perfectly after I cleaned it up and properly prepared it to shoot. I stored the rifle's magazines, tools and cleaning kit the same way. [ I learned this storage method from my father, an Army combat infantryman in WWII (Germany), Korea and RVN -- he said this is how his units prepared their individual and crew-served weapons and other sensitive equipment for sea movement that were going to be transported in the ship's holds. ] I purchased the rifle new in Dec '92, and it has been a tack-driver for 19+ years -- 8" paper plates posted within 300 yds start to quiver when its safety comes off.

-----------------

Pappy said: "If you don't shoot from the unsupported prone, sitting, kneeling and standing positions each visit to the range, then you are not honing your combat rifleman skills, and you will let yourself and your buddies down when it counts."
 

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Coat everything with a thin layer of RIG grease. Don't seal out the air, just lock it up.

I've stored collector rifles (blued and parked) for up to 20 years this way. And I live in Alabama, not exactly a dry environment.

JWB
 

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I have put my wood stocked early 90's Springfield M1A-A1 Bush Rifle in storage for both 4-year and 5-year periods in a high humidity climate without any ill effects by stripping all oil & grease off the metal and wiping down the wood, then lightly -- but thoroughly -- coating all metal and wood surfaces (inside and out) with Johnsons paste wax, including in bore. After reassembling the waxed rifle with the trigger guard inserted but not fully locked down, I wrapped it tightly in multiple layers of saran wrap, then mummy-wrapped it in duct tape, then secured it a non-climate controlled gun safe. When I brought the rifle out of storage I removed the wax from the metal by warming the metal lightly over a coleman one-burner camping stove and wiping off the softened wax. I used my bare hand to rub the wax off/into the wood stock. Although this method takes some time, I had NO corrosion on any metal surface and the wood was not harmed by oil or grease -- at the range, the rifle functioned perfectly after I cleaned it up and properly prepared it to shoot. I stored the rifle's magazines, tools and cleaning kit the same way. [ I learned this storage method from my father, an Army combat infantryman in WWII (Germany), Korea and RVN -- he said this is how his units prepared their individual and crew-served weapons and other sensitive equipment for sea movement that were going to be transported in the ship's holds. ] I purchased the rifle new in Dec '92, and it has been a tack-driver for 19+ years -- 8" paper plates posted within 300 yds start to quiver when its safety comes off.

-----------------

Pappy said: "If you don't shoot from the unsupported prone, sitting, kneeling and standing positions each visit to the range, then you are not honing your combat rifleman skills, and you will let yourself and your buddies down when it counts."
Very excellent for a first post!

Welcome to the forum!
 

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Hi all,

I'm getting ready to store my M14 (classic wood stock) for a long period of time. Unfortunately, the place I'm living is relatively humid (average 60% during dry season), so I've decided to keep my M14 in an air-tight pelican-storm case, taken out all the foams, because foams attract moist, and replaced with a water resistant hardigg fieldpak, and throw in a few desiccant silica gel. I've tested it with a humidity sensor for a few days now, and I'm a little concern because it is slightly too dry in there...

I've read an article somewhere, I couldn't find it now, but it says something about the optimal humidity to store your firearms. I think it's 40-50%, and that covers all kinds of metals, timber and plastic. The sensor inside the hard case shows 36% RH, it doesn't change regardless of the outside RH variation (55%-65%). While the steel parts should be no problem, I afraid that the wood stock might be damaged under 40% RH over time. Can someone please confirm this for me? Your advice is greatly appreciated.

For long term storage in a airtight Pelican case, I would disassemble the rifle into the three basic groups. Get some CLP Collector preservative oil for the metal parts, and some wood oil for the stock. Coat all surfaces with the appropriate oil and lay in the case so the wood does not touch the metal. Throw in a desicant pack and seal. Open the case once every 6 months/1year and check the contents. If any surface is dry, reapply the proper preservative oil(s). Check the desi-pack/recharge to make sure it is blue. This can be done indefinetly. You don't really define "long term" though, so if you mean 10 years or so; thr cosmoline idea will have to apply. dozier
 

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I remember reading somethng about the optimal humidity for firearms storage, too, but I'm afraid I can't find it either. There are some good suggestions above for long term storage of the metal, but it seems to me that if your stock is usually exposed to ambient humidity (60% during the dry season, and I'd assume 80%+ in the not-so-dry season), and it hasn't been harmed so far, why not just remove what metal you can, grease the rest, and leave the stock out seperately? Just a thought.
 

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Storage protection

Take a look at Boeshield T-9. Made by the Boeing Co. for applications in the aerospce industry. I've used it for years on machined sufaces. It outlasts them all, IMO. Pricey, but worth every penny. This product and VPI paper in a thick plastic bag has preserved parts for me for years I'm anal when it comes to rust/moisture. I've also used Brownells polarizing oil with excellent results. Both the VPI paper and the two oils are offered by Brownells. Not connected with Brownells but have been a customer for years.

Honer
 

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I would recommend a product that Sentry Solutions makes, it is called Marine Tuf Cloth.. It can be used on all surfaces such as wood, plastic, metal and so on. I use it on all of my knives and guns and am very happy with it. It doesnt leave any residue once it dries. Plus it is made in the USA...

Here is a link:

http://www.sentrysolutions.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=91020

by the way, I use all of there products and am also a dealer for them.
 
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