M14 Forum banner
1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,672 Posts
Added couple scans describing process,Winchester was the only company that produced a mostly milled receiver.All others used broaching machines to do a lot of the exterior.
Very interesting.
Was this the same case as with the M1 during WWII?
If so, would that be why WRA parts typically have a "rougher" look to them and have more milling marks??

Thanks for your efforts in passing these historical documents / images to us.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,704 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Your talking about an era when mostly high speed steel, plain milling cutters and specialty endmills were used to produce large volumes of parts. You can tell that they pushed the machines and tooling to the limit.Doesn't take much tool wear to produce rough finishes ,start picking up built up edges on cutter teeth ,chips get drug through etc.
Remember most of the receiver called for a 125 surface finish anyway.p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,027 Posts
During that era.... Every man you see in those photos was also the "Quality Control Expert"...............

Hobo

They also took pride in what they did.
I have worked in a couple factories, nearly no one cared if they did it right or not, as long as they got paid. That is why I loved building cabinets and furniture where I did. Everybody loved what they did and quality work was the priority, not the speed of work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Great pics and info. Looking at the pics, looks like the machine operators got a few years under their belts and does not look like they put it in a new modern building. Great place to be on a hot 90 Degree/90% Humidity summer day. All them individual heat producing motors..... Oh boy, quick stop at the tavern for a cold one! Again lots of detail in the pics.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
866 Posts
Where's the white colored, fully enclosed, CAD powered, wonder mill operated by the tatted up millennial w/ "Apple" earbuds?

Seriously, really cool pics.....absolutely enjoyed these!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,704 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Notice the double rows of George Gorton Master mills set up ,the machine pallet system holding receivers for both rows .Each stop opposing mill performing different operations all driven by chain drive.

These were tracing mills ,Winchester was only company to use this set up.
Each station has a lighting system on the control board that tells when machining is complete .
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top