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Found this article and thought it was very informative. I have more than once heard supposed "authorities" claim that you should not shoot any bullet heavier than 150 grain in an M1.


John
I will only add that there have been tens of thousands of competitions, (out to 1,200 yards), shot with Garands loaded with LC, Federal, & Black Hills, 168 grain Match ammo over the years [check with the armourers at MCBQuantico!].
I am also aware that quite a few competitions using Garands were shot with the M72 Match 172 grain bulet, or its' modern equivalent, in recent years.
 

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The biggest problem with garand gear testing is they used some of the weakest M2 ball as their baseline.

The late 60s M2 ball is notoriously underpowered.

Since lots of ammo is just barely too powerful according to them...I'd imagine a larger control sample may prove its not the danger the internet makes it out to be.

Oh... don't forget they are selling you a product and using their test data to support the reason you need to buy from them.
 

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  • * *
  • * * So the real answer is "it's complicated." Sticking to 150 grain is the safest possible answer if you don't have data. The reality is that many modern loads fall in the range expected from M2 Ball. Some significantly exceed it.
Actually, the reality is that an adjustable gas plug, like the one Schuster Mfg. makes, solves all the issues about what commercial '06 ammo is 'Garand-Safe.'

Install the plug, tune your rifle's op rod and gas system to whatever ammo you want to shoot (using the plug's adjustable screw), zero your rifle, .... and that's it. You're GTG.

So easy Gomer Pyle could do it blind-folded.

In my case, I hunt with one of my M1s. That one runs a Schuster adj. gas plug tuned to my 220gn handloads using Varget - they're hotter than Remington's 220gn factory load, but I've never had any issues, plus the plug actually helps tighten groups.

Once you've achieved proper/reliably cycling, turning the screw a quarter turn or two in either direction will tighten or open up your groups.

So in addition to protecting your op rod, the adj. gas plug's internal screw acts as an accurizer.
 

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Actually, the reality is that an adjustable gas plug, like the one Schuster Mfg. makes, solves all the issues about what commercial '06 ammo is 'Garand-Safe.'

Install the plug, tune your rifle's op rod and gas system to whatever ammo you want to shoot (using the plug's adjustable screw), zero your rifle, .... and that's it. You're GTG.

So easy Gomer Pyle could do it blind-folded.

In my case, I hunt with one of my M1s. That one runs a Schuster adj. gas plug tuned to my 220gn handloads using Varget - they're hotter than Remington's 220gn factory load, but I've never had any issues, plus the plug actually helps tighten groups.

Once you've achieved proper/reliably cycling, turning the screw a quarter turn or two in either direction will tighten or open up your groups.

So in addition to protecting your op rod, the adj. gas plug's internal screw acts as an accurizer.
The reality is the garand will handle commercial ammo just fine with good springs and grease. Nothing need to be added.

You don't need it with your varget handloads thats for sure. Hell federal 220s operate at the same pressure as garand safe ammo.
 
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