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Hello I have an opportunity to buy a Springfield M-1 Grand #43017xx
Looks legitimate but I’m no expert I have read that parts scavengers tend to gut them and replace with cheep parts I have know idea of what to look for or basic value of the rifle any help would be appreciated greatly
 

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Barrel date should be in the 5 to 7 1953 range to be original....or there abouts. Look to see if its a welded receiver, but CMP paperwork would eliminate that. Condition of the metal(pitting), damaged stocks, and barrel reading will determine value. A decent one with good barrel readings have been selling in the $1400 range.......FWIW
 

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I just sold an all original and correct 4,311,XXX Springfield M1 with an excellent 6/53 barrel (2 TE/1 MW) and JLG large wheel cartouched stock for $2,300, sold it to a C&R 03FFL, simple, easy deal. Picked it up at a gun show in Roseburg, OR back when DCM was one and done, it was a good investment.
 

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Generally speaking, the internal parts that could be replaced, should have no. stamped sequentially from year to year. You can find reference material that will tell you which years and whether they match the no. years stamped on receiver, barrel, bolt and manufacturer.
Here's a cursory synopsis to get you stared, if interested: How to Determine the Vintage and Origin of M1 Garand Components
I especially like the section on wood restoration.
 

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You all do realize that the Army regularly overhauled M1 and most of them have a mix of manufacturers and dash numbers that are not in any way related to the receiver's heel markings. Barrels are replaced about every six to ten years, depending on type of unit, much shorter if a training unit.

These are not "parts guns", they are the way all long serving military weapons will eventually be.

If you find one that is all matching internally for barrel date, manufacturer's marks, and dash numbers, it is almost assured that someone has gutted it and replaced all the parts.
 

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I have know idea of what to look for or basic value of the rifle any help would be appreciated greatly
Before dropping money, why not start with reading a book on the M1 Garands? That's what I did, and I started with Bruce Canfield's book, M1 Garand and the M1 Carbine (1998), but his much larger and expensive 2013 on the M1 Garand is the ultimate reference.

Value is of course subjective, but with any antique it comes down to three things: 1) Special provenance or documentation, 2) overall condition, and 3) originality/rarity. Same applies to an M1 Garand. Pictures are needed to answer your questions.
Hello I have an opportunity to buy a Springfield M-1 Grand #43017xx
That said, I am familiar with that serial range. Back in 2012 I hand-picked from CMP South Store a 4,301,6xx Garand that was fairly original. I subsequently traded it for another rifle, but I kept the pics. Here's the three most important items that will determine originality, which drives up value.
Drinkware Wine Drink Glass bottle Font

First, original finish with appropriate patina will look something like this. The front handguard had been replaced, as it didn't have the patina that the stock and rear handguard had, but the metal and edge wear/patina was even throughout the rifle. Pics are always needed to discern this topic...
Air gun Trigger Line Gun barrel Gun accessory

Second, the original stock will likely have an "SA" over "JLG" stamp, as seen here, but original stocks are unsual. (It is possible that it could have a DAS cartouche - but that depends when in 1953 the rifle was assembled and proof-fired. July/August 1953 was a period of transition). An original 'JLG' stock drives up value, but many stocks got replaced over time. Pics are need to discern original cartouche, or any re-build stamps (and there are plenty of fake "JLG" cartouches on stocks these days as well)
Light Musical instrument Wood Line Gas


Thirdly, the original mid-1953 barrel will have this circular "cross-cannons" acceptance stamp. (Sometimes this stamp can be slightly under the handguard). Barrel date on this 4,301,6xx was 5-53. Around July/August 1953 this stamp (and the one for the stock) changed to the rectangular "DAS" stamp. So if the 4,301,7xx has a barrel marked like this original one (which is less than 100 digits apart), it is unlikely that it was rebuilt...this is not a guarantee of course, but again, without any pictures it is completely impossible to evaluate an M1 Garand.
Office equipment Office supplies Material property Cylinder Font

My 5cts in pics (which is of course worth 10,000 words...as condition & originality matter most.)
 

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Are you looking for a shooter or an investment? The requirements for a fun shooter are less demanding and less money while still letting you have fun with a piece of history. Also, surplus 30-06 ammo is drying up so if you plan on shooting it be prepared to pay commercial prices.
 

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Before dropping money, why not start with reading a book on the M1 Garands? That's what I did, and I started with Bruce Canfield's book, M1 Garand and the M1 Carbine (1998), but his much larger and expensive 2013 on the M1 Garand is the ultimate reference. Value is of course subjective, but with any antique it comes down to three things: 1) Significant documentation, 2) overall condition, and 3) originality/rarity. Same applies to an M1 Garand. Pictures are needed to answer your questions.

That said, I am familiar with that serial range. Back in 2012 I hand-picked from CMP South Store a 4,301,6xx Garand that was fairly original. I subsequently traded it for another rifle, but I kept the pics. Here's the three most important items that will determine originality, which drives up value.
View attachment 486285
First, original finish with appropriate patina will look something like this. The front handguard had been replaced, as it didn't have the patina that the stock and rear handguard had, but the metal and edge wear/patina was even throughout the rifle. Pics are always needed to discern this topic...
View attachment 486288
Second, the original stock will likely have an "SA" over "JLG" stamp, as seen here, but original stocks are unsual. (It is possible that it could have a DAS cartouche - but that depends when in 1953 the rifle was assembled and proof-fired. July/August 1953 was a period of transition). An original 'JLG' stock drives up value, but many stocks got replaced over time. Pics are need to discern original cartouche, or any re-build stamps (and there are plenty of fake "JLG" cartouches on stocks these days as well)
View attachment 486286

Thirdly, the original mid-1953 barrel will have this circular "cross-cannons" acceptance stamp. (Sometimes this stamp can be slightly under the handguard). Barrel date on this 4,301,6xx was 5-53. Around July/August 1953 this stamp (and the one for the stock) changed to the rectangular "DAS" stamp. So if the 4,301,7xx has a barrel marked like this original one (which is less than 100 digits apart), it is unlikely that it was rebuilt...this is not a guarantee of course, but again, without any pictures it is completely impossible to evaluate an M1 Garand.
View attachment 486287
My 5cts in pics (which is of course worth 10,000 words...as condition & originality matter most.)
Nice detailed post. Here are a few pics of the 4,311,XXX that I sold recently,











 

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Before dropping money, why not start with reading a book on the M1 Garands? That's what I did, and I started with Bruce Canfield's book, M1 Garand and the M1 Carbine (1998), but his much larger and expensive 2013 on the M1 Garand is the ultimate reference. Value is of course subjective, but with any antique it comes down to three things: 1) Significant documentation, 2) overall condition, and 3) originality/rarity. Same applies to an M1 Garand. Pictures are needed to answer your questions.

That said, I am familiar with that serial range. Back in 2012 I hand-picked from CMP South Store a 4,301,6xx Garand that was fairly original. I subsequently traded it for another rifle, but I kept the pics. Here's the three most important items that will determine originality, which drives up value.
View attachment 486285
First, original finish with appropriate patina will look something like this. The front handguard had been replaced, as it didn't have the patina that the stock and rear handguard had, but the metal and edge wear/patina was even throughout the rifle. Pics are always needed to discern this topic...
View attachment 486288
Second, the original stock will likely have an "SA" over "JLG" stamp, as seen here, but original stocks are unsual. (It is possible that it could have a DAS cartouche - but that depends when in 1953 the rifle was assembled and proof-fired. July/August 1953 was a period of transition). An original 'JLG' stock drives up value, but many stocks got replaced over time. Pics are need to discern original cartouche, or any re-build stamps (and there are plenty of fake "JLG" cartouches on stocks these days as well)
View attachment 486286

Thirdly, the original mid-1953 barrel will have this circular "cross-cannons" acceptance stamp. (Sometimes this stamp can be slightly under the handguard). Barrel date on this 4,301,6xx was 5-53. Around July/August 1953 this stamp (and the one for the stock) changed to the rectangular "DAS" stamp. So if the 4,301,7xx has a barrel marked like this original one (which is less than 100 digits apart), it is unlikely that it was rebuilt...this is not a guarantee of course, but again, without any pictures it is completely impossible to evaluate an M1 Garand.
View attachment 486287
My 5cts in pics (which is of course worth 10,000 words...as condition & originality matter most.)
Couldn't agree more! Reading Canfield's books before diving into collecting Garands is a must in my mind.
 
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