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Lubricants for M14 / M1A

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What's the new and improved lubes for the M14 / M1A. My rifle was dry out of the box and got a good cleaning and a dose of CLP, but it seems there should be some areas that require a heavier lube.



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I'm sort of new with M14/M1A type rifles but, from what I've been told, put a little good quality lithium grease on the rails, bolt lugs, roller, and any "action" pieces where metal touches metal. I think some people like the "Tetra" brand.
 

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There are MANY types and many opinions,,but I use Tetra Grease on all my critical parts,,I use Tetra Oil in my Barrel when done cleaning! Good stuff :) Lots of guys use Lubriplate Grease also,,its cheap and it works! I'm sure you will get a few more opinions,,and I'm sure all will be good ones,,it all boils down to what you can get your hands on locally! Good Luck,,, :)
 

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I use the military grease in the little cups with the yellow lids. It's either lubriplate or plastilube, not sure which.

Works great.
 

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So much of our understanding of the world is shaped by advertising. Our behavior is molded by the advertising presented to us, so much so that we believe we need specialized oils and greases for firearms. When in fact, this is not so.

If you read in the book “M1 Garand to M14 Rifle”, you will find that during WWII the Garand experienced problems with operating rod/bolt lug seizing in wet climates. They conducted numerous experiments with different materials, a roller lug on the bolt (which was incorporated in the M14 bolt) but the simple solution that involved no hardware changes was a speciality lubricant. The military purchased commercial greases, conducted a rain test on them, and found that Lubriplate 130 was the most acceptable commercial grease. Animal fat was actually the best of them all! Having found an acceptable grease they wrote a performance specification based on the physical properties of Lubriplate 130. Anyone who could make a grease that passed the environmental and property tests outlined in Mil-G-46003 was able to sell it as “Rifle Grease” to the Military.

These are the most common military lubricants for rifles excluding CLP:

MIL-G-46003, Grease Rifle

VV-L-800 General purpose lubricating oil

Mil L 46000 Lubricant, semi-fluid (Automatic Weapons) LSA.

When you compare the viscosities and stability requirements in Mil-G-46003 against the commercial grease specifications, what you find is that Military Rifle Grease is basically a NLGI 3 water resistant bearing grease. I do not see any reason why a good grade of NLGI 2 Marine Wheel Bearing grease would not work equally as well in a M1 or M1a.

Rifle grease is meant for a hot wet environment and not in temperatures less than 32 F. At least so says the spec.

I really like LSA as an all weather overall lubricant. VV-L-800 also is a good lubricating oil for rifles if you read the specification.

I think the easiest advice to follow, that I was given as a novice, for M1/M14’s was to use LSA in the winter and rifle grease in the summer. But as long as you use an oil in the winter, and a grease in the summer, your rifle will not have any lubrication problems.

Now, outside of Mil Spec products, what would make an acceptable substitute? After looking at the military specifications and engine oil specifications, I think engine oil will work just fine for a gun oil. Millions have been and are being spent on automotive and industrial lubrication. Compare that to the pennies spent on gun oil research. I have been using an old bottle of 5W-30 synthetic motor oil, and when that is gone, I may use a regular 5W-30 motor oil. Modern motor oil contains the latest in additive package technology . These additive packages contain Acid neutralizers, Antifoam agents, Antioxidants, Antirust, Antiwear agents, Corrosion inhibitors Detergents, Dispersants, Emulsifiers, Extreme pressure additives, Oiliness enhancers and viscosity index improvers. Motor oil is a highly spec’d item, is a great lubricant, and cheap compared to the commercial repackaged stuff sold as gun oils. Automatic transmission fluid would also work well, is a highly spec’d item, but I just do not like the smell. As for greases, a good grade of NLGI 2 Marine Wheel Bearing grease should work just fine. As well as Lubriplate 130, plastilube, etc.

The lubrication requirements of rifles is not that mysterious or complicated, or stressing (compared with jet turbines!) and you will find many industrial or automotive greases and oils that will work. But most importantly, keep it lubricated!. Your rifle is a mechanical piece of machinery and needs to be kept clean and lubricated!
 

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I use the same grease on my 14 as I do on my boat trailer Axel. Just not so much on the rifle. Pick one you like and keep a thin coat on your moving parts. A lot of any grease is a sand and dust magnet,JMO.
 

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I took a tactical carbine class down in Texas that was taught by a former Delta guy named Mickey Ubiseck. Anyway, he said he used synthetic engine oil for weapons lube. I hear this stuff works well in cars, too!
 

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I figure if it is good enough to carry my vehicle/boat or have a couple pounds of aluminum/steel slammed back and forth several hundred times a second. It's probably good enough for a rifle.

With that. I avoid anything with too much sulfur, Pennzoil or build up sludge, Quakerstate. I have a bunch of the old formula CLP I am using sparingly, but once that is gone, it is gone. LSA is another option wen I can get ahold of it. Otherwise a decent 5W or 10W will work.

for grease a good waterproof wheel bearing grease. Preferably a molybdenum version.
 

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Cheaper Than Dirt has USGI Garand grease cups at a few bucks for 144 cups! And while lubriplate is indeed good stuff , I've been using Super-Lube. A waterproof , hi-temp , teflon-based synthetic grease. RadioShak sells it under the LubeGel name. I filled a couple old cups with it and carry it in my rifles.
 

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Re: lubriplate 105

SoDak said:
Would lubriplate 105 work? Because that's all I can get.
I did a web search for information on Lubriplate 105. Here is some advertizing I found;

"B-105, Calcium Grease

1.75 oz. tube

LUBRIPLATE No. 105 is a white, waterproof, NLGI No. 0, grease type lubricant possessing exceptional anti-seize properties and recommended extensively for coating all moving parts for motor assembly and rebuilding.

LUBRIPLATE No. 105 is also recommended for the following applications: Fishing reels, door hinges, battery terminals, wheel and nut assemblies, press fittings, windshield wipers, radio antennas, remote control gear shift mechanisms, anti-seize applications, hinges on trunk and hood, shackle pin and spring assemblies, and general rust proofing of parts and tools."

Basically the larger the NLGI number, the thicker the stuff. So this is a light, water proof grease. Should work fine in 30 degree weather, may ooze off in hot weather. Try an outboard motor grease in hot weather.

Ask your self this, why should it not work? As long as the stuff stays on it will provide some level of lubrication. So what are you worried about? This is a brand name grease and has properties to an industry standard. This grease is obviously blended with anti seize additives, probably more. It is not like it is Vasoline or Crisco. And a rifle is not a gas turbine bearing operating at 800 F or so, or a car wheel bearing that might get up to 200 F. The lubrication requirements for rifles is not that temperature or envirnomentally extreme. Just keep it lubricated. Lightly lubricated. Never run a rifle dry.
 

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Quagmire said:
I use the military grease in the little cups with the yellow lids. It's either lubriplate or plastilube, not sure which.

Works great.
Same here - it works great and it's cheap :mrgreen:

http://www.civilianmarksmanship.com/accessoryhtml/accgreasepots.html

I don't use a Q-tip because of the loose fibers. I break the tip off and use the nub. I also use a wooden popsicle stick.
A little dab will do ya :D
 
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