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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have not seen any references on this, but baised on my experience with other guns I think it is worth talking about...

For many years I have always "lubed" the "working parts" of my bolts, currently, with BreakFree.

By "working parts" I mean the ejector and the extractor.

Everytime I clean one of the "M" rifles I put a drop or two of BreakFree in the ejector "hole", and around the extractor from the top, and in the extractor stem hole from the bottom.

I have been doing this for many years, and I have never had ANY problems with the "working parts" in the bolt of these 2 rifles.

I do the same with any rifle that has a spring plunger type of ejector [like say a Remington 700, an M16 or a Blaser R 93]. I even do it on the extractor of my H&K rifles...

Does anybody else do this???

If not maybe you should.
 

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Very, very sparingly and only if I don't intend to shoot the rifle for a while - for several reasons. One, I like a dry chamber. Pulling back and releasing the bolt sprays the inside of the chamber with oil. Second, the oil has to go somewhere and usually thru the action and into the wood - another "no, no" in my humble estimation. Oil also attracts dirt and dust. This is just me. HTH
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have found that BreakFree does not overly attract carbon or any other kind of fouling or dirt.

It is truely a CLP [Cleaner, Lubricant, Protector].

If I could have only one all round "Juice" for guns it would be BreakFree.

You do still need a grease, and one bore cleaner for copper fouling...
 

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Civilian Break Free maybe. Ever since they dumped the teflon in the mil spec version, it's pretty much worthless. We took to mixing 3 parts CLP with 1 part ATF for cleaning. Wouldn't use that on the ejector.

Your method is still standard for M16 series maintenance.
 

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Unless you are just putting a light film or a dry lube I don't like using any lubricants since the extractor and ejector all lead to the firing pin channel and I don't like having any lube in the FP channel at all.

I only grease the bolt roller.
 

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A very good idea for the super tight tolerance of the AR series of weapons. BUT for weapons like the Garand family of weapons Ie mini 14s, M1 Carbines, M14s, and Garands a greese of some sort is the best choise. From the fear of oil penetrating to the wood, being slung off, to it attracting dirt and carbon makes it a bad idea. The military or atleast the USMC still recomends greese like LSA/LST for the DMR M14s, the same stuff we use for the M2's, 240's, 249's. Mk 19's etc. The greese sticks, lubricates the weapon, and keeps them smoooooooooth.
 

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I always give my bolt face and all parts a good shot of can clp after the range just figuring a light clean up and lube was always healthy and good preventative maintenance. let the bolt forward onto a few patches, tip the rifle up and let excess run through fp channel and onto cloth at the back. again wipe any excess from face/back and swab chamber and bore as finishing touch. have been doing this for a while, never a problem and everything looks great. my experience with clp is parts always look "dry" a week or two later anyway after application. and fwiw the reason I use other lube in the AR.

good to finally see some other suggestions not to, always just took it upon myself to squirt the bolt. Since I had not seen any info on this ever or posted in the stickies, suppose now I know why. still learning the ropes
 

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I have not seen any references on this, but baised on my experience with other guns I think it is worth talking about...

For many years I have always "lubed" the "working parts" of my bolts, currently, with BreakFree.

By "working parts" I mean the ejector and the extractor.

Everytime I clean one of the "M" rifles I put a drop or two of BreakFree in the ejector "hole", and around the extractor from the top, and in the extractor stem hole from the bottom.

I have been doing this for many years, and I have never had ANY problems with the "working parts" in the bolt of these 2 rifles.

I do the same with any rifle that has a spring plunger type of ejector [like say a Remington 700, an M16 or a Blaser R 93]. I even do it on the extractor of my H&K rifles...

Does anybody else do this???If not maybe you should.

Yep, I do.
Any two parts that move together rubbing metal to metal, need some form of lubrication, and cleaned and kept sand , dirt, and carbon free, in intervals. With the exception of the piston and cylinder. There, I use a minute amount of dry lubricant, motor mica, then wiped off and cleaned from the piston grooves. A few cycles, then wiped again and go shoot.

I have taken many bolt guts apart, and the damage to the ejectors is apparent when not lubed properly. Also rusted extractor springs and bearings. Just no need for that to happen if they are kept lubed properly, they will eventually break if not. Also the shaft of the extractor should be coated with some lubricant inside the bolt body. I use light Rem oil on the firing pin rear shoulder and keep the shaft and nose dry.
 

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I have not seen any references on this, but baised on my experience with other guns I think it is worth talking about...

For many years I have always "lubed" the "working parts" of my bolts, currently, with BreakFree.

By "working parts" I mean the ejector and the extractor.

Everytime I clean one of the "M" rifles I put a drop or two of BreakFree in the ejector "hole", and around the extractor from the top, and in the extractor stem hole from the bottom.

I have been doing this for many years, and I have never had ANY problems with the "working parts" in the bolt of these 2 rifles.

I do the same with any rifle that has a spring plunger type of ejector [like say a Remington 700, an M16 or a Blaser R 93]. I even do it on the extractor of my H&K rifles...

Does anybody else do this???

If not maybe you should.

NE, I too do as you do. I think taht any parts that slide or rub together need a little lube to prevent wear. As I use a needle oiler, I use less than a drop in those areas, and wipe off the excess from the bolt face. I've done this on a large variety of firearms, and have never encountered a problem. dozier
 

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I put a light coat of LSA on the shiny spots of the lugs and generous amount worked into the bolt roller. A light coat won't get slung around nor will it collect a considerable amount of crud.
 

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I use grease on the bolt roller, rails, and inside the op-rod where the spring goes. I have a synthetic stock, so I don't have to worry about ruining the stock. When I finish at the range I give the action and bore a heavy blast of CLP. Makes the cleaning easier.
 

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Possible Alternatives

REM Oil dries, leaving a lubing film, but no "stiction" problems, behind. As well, I'm going to try Remington Bright-Bore, used to remove plastic and other fouling from shotgun bores. It should be rinsed off after using it to loosen the baddies, followed by that Rem Oil product.

I may also try my old standby, LPS #1, assuming I don't over-lube, and then wipe or shake off all excess materials before re-assembly.
 

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I usually clean everything with Hoppes 9 and once or twice a year use some Butches Bore Bright in the tube, as far as grease I use superlube and grease the bolt channel and bolt roller/lugs along with the Op rod spring and then spray some Rem oil on a shop rag and wipe everything down before I put her up and that's it
 

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Lubriplate 130A. Brownells sells a pint can for $10 + shipping. Enough to last three lifetimes.
 

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I've always dripped oil (plenty of it) in the front and rear of the bolt and then moved the firing pin back and forth in the bolt. I drip oil behind the extractor so it gets to the spring. I drip oil on the ejector and then wipe off the excess and grease the roller and left side lug and install it.

Not ever having lived in a dry dusty environment I over lube everything and everything keeps on working.

Lots of lube, in my experience, helps it get cleaned up quicker/easier, too.

In the Army I used PLS on the M60 when I had to carry one. Just open up the feed tray cover, pour some in, some lube and some crud come out the bottom and the gun keeps on firing. Add more PLS as needed (I carried a quart can) - the gun will "tell" you when it needs more lube.

No one in the company got their M60 cleaned, inspected and turned back into the arms room quicker than I did. The excess lube helps by washing some crud out of the gun and by keeping carbon from burning onto the surfaces in other places.
 
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