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The piston and cylinder are fit with close tolerance and polished very smooth. No lube is required or desired for both the M1 & M14/M1A. The hot gases will turn oil or grease to a sticky varnish. You will not like the results.
 

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Lube in the gas system of either rifle is bad...

Firing the rifle will cause the gasses and lube to form a really nasty mess that will inhibit the gas system from operating correctly.

db
 

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El Cazador said:
Why is it so important to keep lube and solvent out of the gas system of a M14/M1A? Is it the same for M1 Gerands?
Because the gas that powers the system is of sufficiently high temperature that any lubes will instantly carbonize. Just gets the gas system dirty faster.

Don't get any water in there either. I read somewhere about some idiot who cleaned his gas piston with water. Didn't get all of the water out of the tail. When shooting the water flashed into steam and blew the gas plug clean off the rifle and stripped the threads of the gas cylinder.
 

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[quote="djl4570]Don't get any water in there either. I read somewhere about some idiot who cleaned his gas piston with water. Didn't get all of the water out of the tail. When shooting the water flashed into steam and blew the gas plug clean off the rifle and stripped the threads of the gas cylinder.[/quote]

Well, I would have to see that to believe that. Now what if a soldier were in a country like....oh say Vietnam and it wasd during the rainy season. I;m sure that from WWII to Vietnam, somewhere at some time, there were soldiers with water in the gas system when the rifle was fired. Unless the rifle was underwater when fired, I wouldn;t think that the rifle would blow up if there was a minute amount of water in the gas system. :roll:

Oh, and just keep the oil/lube out of it and you will be fine. :wink:
 

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colt100 said:
Oh, and just keep the oil/lube out of it and you will be fine. :wink:
Actually, it's currently recommended to put 1-2 drops of Hoppes #9 solvent into the gas cylinder hole to lubricate the gas system.
This is current USMC practice. Doing this prevents moisture from causing any rust or corrosion while not being used.

This can also be verified by Gus Fisher (AMU armorer) on the CSP board.



 

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ask JR about firing the M14 immediately after coming out of the water. i think he said something like charlie didn't complain.
 

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warbird said:
colt100 said:
Oh, and just keep the oil/lube out of it and you will be fine. :wink:
Actually, it's currently recommended to put 1-2 drops of Hoppes #9 solvent into the gas cylinder hole to lubricate the gas system.
This is current USMC practice. Doing this prevents moisture from causing any rust or corrosion while not being used.

This can also be verified by Gus Fisher (AMU armorer) on the CSP board.





Is this for storage or for firing? I agree with a bit of lube if storing the rifle but have always been under the assumption that if firing the rifle, the gas system should be dry otherwise the lube just turns into carbon and fouls up the works.

My M1a sees the range all the time so I never worry about storage. I was talking about firing the rifle. Sorry if there was confusion. :oops:
 

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Gas system lube

The US Army and I recommend that the gas system in the M14 be kept clean and dry. Army rifle team members are responsible for maintaining their rifles. The USMC recommends that M14 shooters apply a drop of Hoppe's in the gas cylinder after shooting. There is a reason for this. It has to do with the Marine requirement that rifle team shooters are not to disassemble their rifles. Every 1200 rounds or so, Marine shooters turn their rifle in to the armorer for a complete cleaning, including the gas cylinder. The M1 rifle is almost self cleaning. The gas system blows most of the carbon out each shot. When I was shooting for the Air Force, we were instructed to remove the gas plug and squirt a shot of WD40 in the gas cylinder. It worked pretty good on the old M1. :p
 
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