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Discussion Starter #1
Bare with me, I'm sure I'm not the only person who has been new to the M14/M1a platform wanting to know a few things that seem pretty obvious to people who have been messing around with them for awhile. I figured I would ask so others starting out with the M1a won't be in the same boat if they see this thread.

Now, to my question haha. I recently bought an op rod spring guide and tin gas piston from Sadlak for my new M1a Scout. The spring guide was an easy install done in seconds, but I am having the hardest time trying to loosen the gas plug to replace the gas piston. I also bought the combination tool and gas cylinder wrench from Sadlak, but it's not really helping. The wrench seems wobbly and the combination tool doesn't give me the length I need to really put some leverage on it. Is there something I'm missing? Is there a common method anyone uses? Thanks in advance.
 

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The gas cylinder wrench is to counter the force you use to release the gas plug so you don't torque the barrel itself.
Springfield is known to use gorillas on their plug so the first time can be difficult.
Leverage is your friend. Get a long handle socket driver or a breaker bar. It's not a science or something tricky. It's brute force if they used an air wrench to put it on.
The combo wrench is too short. Get something longer that gives you leverage.


Bare with me, I'm sure I'm not the only person who has been new to the M14/M1a platform wanting to know a few things that seem pretty obvious to people who have been messing around with them for awhile. I figured I would ask so others starting out with the M1a won't be in the same boat if they see this thread.

Now, to my question haha. I recently bought an op rod spring guide and tin gas piston from Sadlak for my new M1a Scout. The spring guide was an easy install done in seconds, but I am having the hardest time trying to loosen the gas plug to replace the gas piston. I also bought the combination tool and gas cylinder wrench from Sadlak, but it's not really helping. The wrench seems wobbly and the combination tool doesn't give me the length I need to really put some leverage on it. Is there something I'm missing? Is there a common method anyone uses? Thanks in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, yeah I figured since it was a new gun it would be tighter than usual. Yeah, I used the wrench just for counter force, not to torque the barrel. I apologize if I sounded like I was doing the opposite.
 

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The important concern is to prevent the gas plug and the gas cylinder from 'rotating' around the barrel as you apply torque to the gas plug.

I'd try holding the front portion of the gas cylinder 'gently with padded jaws' in a study bench vise. Support the weight and position of the rifle with other bracing - the vise is used ONLY to prevent the gas cylinder from rotating as you unscrew the plug. Don't tighten the jaws tightly on the cylinder!

With the gas cylinder held in place, then use whatever sockets / extensions you need to loosen the plug.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
 

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I don't know why they put them on so tight but when you get it off, a dab of lube on the threaded part of the plug and resist the temptation to put it back real tight again, just isn't necessary. Just snug and a bit is enough.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you everyone for the advice. Yeah, no bench vice right now. That will be a future purchase for sure! Thanks for the tip on using the tape too. I was afraid I was going to mess with the finish. Haha yes that guy at SAI needs to chill out with that wrench! I will definitely be putting lube on the threads too, thanks for the recommendation.
 

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I'll second the anti-seize. I got introduced to it when I was still too young to buy my own guns, but had a job that included soldering electronic components. Had to regularly change out tips and a good copper based ant-seize was a must.
IMHO, the silver colored anti-seize will work fine, it's just that the copper based is better in really hot environments.



That little tube is pricey, but one will last you a lifetime with several guns to use it on, if you don't lose it.
 

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Spray some Breakfree CLP into the gas relief hole and angle the rifle barrel down in a gun vise or makeshift rig so the CLP works it way into the gas plug threads. Let the CLP work for 24-48 hrs, then use the GI universal tool on the nut along with the barrel/gas tube wrench. You should be able to break the gas tube nut by squeezing both tools together. Clean the gas tube using a bore cleaner and a brass brush and spray down the piston with brake cleaner to remove the CLP. Then lightly apply a light coating of anti-seize to the threads of the gas plug for future removal.
 
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