M14 Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,319 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a nice USGI M14 stock that the wood is compressed in the trigger latch area. I would like to salvage the stock. Just thought I would add some JB Weld to this area.
Any tips for doing this, please be specific as possible as this is new to me
Thanks guys
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
249 Posts
I would probably do it just as if I was bedding the rifle. Carving out and drilling the stock like below would be a good place to start.



Then apply several coats of release agent to the trigger troup and clay it up like below to avoid getting it stuck in there.



Put the JB-Weld in, and cut the excess away when it is in a leathery hardness state. You'll probably want to create a piece of coathanger in a U-shape like below to hold the trigger group partially closed while the JB Weld sets. Then there will be good tension when the TG is fully closed.



Ungunk it when finished and put it back in tight.

Full M1A bedding site: http://imageseek.com/m1a/M1A_Bedding/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Get a copy of Kuhnhausen's .30 cal service rifles manual. Then turn to page 355. It's actually an easy job to do and any competent Service Rifle "Gun Plumber" should be able to do it for you. If you get the tension too tight though--it can cause havoc with your trigger group. Some is good--too much is not so good.
HTH
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,319 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thats exactly what I was looking for Thanks!
I'm kinda surprised that when bedded the trigger gaurd is only about 3/8 inch from being closed. That doesnt look like it would clamp down very tight to me.
Maybe my stock is good as is. I thought I might want to to some repair as where the assembly sets the wood is compressed. My trigger gaurd starts to get heavy about 1/2 from being closed. I thought it should start getting pressure at about the end of the trigger.
Any opinions?
Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,319 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Heres pics of the compressed area, what ya think, should I just leave it as is?
Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
335 Posts
I had a similar question. But my issue was the lock up was way, way too tight.

The answer I got was in this thread:

http://m14tfl.com/upload/showthread.php?t=90721

I have since learned the answer was about right. I eventually found another thread but I can't find it where somebody said it should take the force of a firm handshake to lock the trigger guard.

BTW it doesn't take much material to really change the lock up pressure. Material about the thickness of a beer can makes a pretty big difference.

Hope this helps.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,325 Posts
thin

Heres pics of the compressed area, what ya think, should I just leave it as is?
Thanks
Hey old friend, look at the bottom of your trigger group and see if the plate tabs have an even amount of wear or shine on both sides, also note the angle, if they are both covered with shine ( most have wood signs on them) then you are sitting evenly, a lot of them sit crooked and need shimmed on one side only to change entire lock-up pressure, I would try the aforementioned aluminum shim first, then you will have an idea of the amount of bedding and location it needs it in. Most will not require the full blown bedding job illustrated above.....nice post BTW....But if you have just a touch of uneven wear, note location and take a quick swipe with some JB weld and a putty knife there, let it dry, test for fit, and sand or file down as needed. We are talking a thin film only.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,319 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thats all I was thinking of doing just a thin film.
I receintly had the trigger assembly reparked so there isnt any wear to it yet. One side of the wood is compressed more than the other . On a new stock are those areas shown cut out or is that actually compressed?
If I do add any JB Weld there I would think I should apply some to the tail or the trigger housing also?
Thanks
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,325 Posts
Yes they are cut-out on new ones.

A little at the back can't hurt if needed to level it up for lock-up if it doesn't make it too tight, you might just slip some aluminum shims under it first to see before going that route in the back.
If it gets too thick down in there, it is a little more difficult to get out. I good sharp wood chisel with the bevel down and the right width will make short work of it though. Be careful if you use a chisel though....there are more carpenters and individuals injured every year from using a wood chisel than any other tool !!! Some study said combined tools don't have as many as chisels...I think it is because they are so razor sharp and most folks don't know the proper use.....you are right, the proper use is not JB weld......but it works
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top