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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There has been mention of various livestock people have & want. But what about for long term survival?

Bread is basically flour, eggs, milk, & salt. And bread is suppose to be the staple of life. But every region of the world has its own variety of bread. Flour is grown. Salt is mined. That leaves eggs & milk.

Chickens are a mainstay of any farm. They require little maintainence & food. They sure do help in keeping the bugs down. Constantly allowing one hen to sit on a clutch of eggs ensures reproduction. At a few months old you can easily tell the hens from the roosters. So the young roosters become food as do older hens that no longer lay eggs.

Milk can come from several sources. As well as the milk is cheese & butter. Most think of a dairy cow. Yep, you get alot of milk from a dairy cow but that is alot of food for her also. And most need mated once a year. A big bull can be a handful.

Another good source of milk is goats. One ram can service 20 females. The females need mated once a year. Normal is two offspring each year & deliver in the spring. Come fall you can harvest any young males.

Some of the best cheese is considered a mix of cow & goat milk.

So what about meat? Sheep may be the choice. They are alot less maintenance then larger livestock. Plus there is the added benefit of the wool each spring.

HH
 

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Pigs produce three times as much meat as a ratio to feed required to raise them when compared with cattle. So while you could get 100lbs of beef you could generate 300lbs of pork for the same feed commitment. I believe chickens also share this a similar ratio to pigs. I believe the magic number is 3lbs of feed per 1 lb of pork meat generated. That would make it 9lbs of feed required for every 1 lb of cow meat generated.

Goats can also be eaten. Ironically, I just had "cabrito" (goat) today for lunch with clients at a traditional Mexican style restaurant. It tastes like chicken...

I know goats also generate more milk per pound when compared to cows as well. I do not have the ratios for this though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
And for the colder climate people, sheep can take the cold alot better then cows or cattle.

HH
 

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I have tons of feral chickens digging up my yard.

I guess I'll do eggs and chicken.

Pass on the milk.

Yeast
Sugar
Water
salt
flour
 

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We have laying hens and hogs here. Both are easy to care for and don’t require much space.

The farm I get my baby pigs from has a lot of goats. They use them for meat, milk and making ice cream and soap. I have tried all of this from them and it all was good. Goats seem very versatile from my observations. Pigs are my personal favorite as I think they are the smartest animal on the farm.

This year I went over an helped that same farm the day they butchered all their broiler chickens. That was also very easy, just make sure you rent a plucker.

I am going to try 100 pastured broiler chickens here next spring.

HD
 

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Pigs produce three times as much meat as a ratio to feed required to raise them when compared with cattle. So while you could get 100lbs of beef you could generate 300lbs of pork for the same feed commitment. I believe chickens also share this a similar ratio to pigs. I believe the magic number is 3lbs of feed per 1 lb of pork meat generated. That would make it 9lbs of feed required for every 1 lb of cow meat generated.

Goats can also be eaten. Ironically, I just had "cabrito" (goat) today for lunch with clients at a traditional Mexican style restaurant. It tastes like chicken...

I know goats also generate more milk per pound when compared to cows as well. I do not have the ratios for this though.
I believe your conversion ratio's assume that the animals are being fed a concentrate, like corn or some other grain. Cattle can thrive on grass alone. Instead of feeding them to an animal, you would probably eat the grains yourself, and let the cattle eat the grasses to produce meat and milk. Goats, pigs, and chickens are easy prey to predators like coyotes. I don't think pigs, or chickens do as well on native grasses as cattle do (goats maybe)? You could also yoke a cow to a plow, now you have a farm, or at least a large garden.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Meat, eggs, & milk is what livestock is all about.

Any side benefit is a bonus. Such as wool from sheep.

HH
 

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And for the colder climate people, sheep can take the cold alot better then cows or cattle.

HH
Depends entirely on the breed. Lots of cattle are raised in Canada, as well as Montana, Dakotas, etc.... Cold up there, and darn good cattle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Feral cats in the barn to keep the rodent population down & some daog to warn or keep the prey critters away.

HH
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Here's a youtube on easy making of cheese.
[ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jBPYopcoeqs[/ame]
Some types of cheeses you need a press for to separate the curd from the way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
And here's a youtube on making butter.
[ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oropJD0CUxI[/ame]
As well as the butter you get the buttermilk.

HH
 

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More info

Chickens are ok but dont forget the guinea fowl ! they lay eggs as much as chicken do they are more hardy and make excellent watchdogs day and night! nothing sneaks up on a flock of guinea's they make enough noise to wake the neighbors if a snake or hawk owl cat dog or people come close. good for meat and eggs . can survive on little or no food little water and heat tolerant . they originate from africa .different colors white, speckeld, black,and gray !

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I don't know where you are getting your facts about pigs. but here we have a serious feral pig problem they are smart and will eat anything and do all TOO well procreating in the wild. We can't seem to even make a dent in their population with trapping and hunting. 2-3 litters of 6+ Pigglets a year off just one female and male. do the math and in 3-4 years you are overrun with em. last year we trapped 3, one boar and two sows. one of the sows was pregnant and had 6 so we raised the 6 little ones born in Feb. butchered one this afternoon and it was at least 75 lbs. big problem is they will hurt ground nesting birds and other wildlife population. They compete for browse with deer, plow up the ground with their rooting so increase erosion, and eat eggs of quail/pheasnt etc...

so in the case of teotwawki my pig traps and snares will get serious work out.
 

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rabbits

rabbits produce more meat for the amont of feed than any other domestic animal. Is is a high protein meat. They can be taken care of in a few minutes a day, are relatively odorless, and quiet.

They require only a small money investment, take up little space and are easy to keep in good health.

Ten does and two bucks will provide about one and a half to two pounds of meat per day. Their productive life is two to four years. They also produce fur and the best natural fertilizer (about 40% of the total weight of their food).
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
But having rabbits, you still still need some livestock with fat on it. Rabbit skin is very very thin making their pelts low value.

HH
 

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Be very selective in buying cattle. Todays cattle are very similar to todays people in that they are very dependent on subsidies to survive. Find cattle that are suited to your region and come from a line of breeding that hasn't been pampered with supplementary feed. Younger cattle are more efficient than older and smaller breeds are generally more efficient than the larger breeds. High milk production means high feed inputs as well.
 

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Rabbits are very sensitive to heat stress. It's hard to keep them if your climate is over 95 in the summer. Some chickens don't like heat as well. Make sure you check with the guy at tractor supply about what breed of chicken does well in your area.

Wild hogs are evil. A domestic hog can go feral in a few months in the wild. Might want to invest in a box trap for free meat. The little snots knock over my deer feeders every year
 

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Wow

The problem with all this hog talk is what about the BBQ sauce where are we going to get enough sauce this many pigs means I would have to buy and store 55 gal barrels of sauce ... some just might think it is water in all those barrels but noooo it is sweet and thick and tangy to slather all over that fire roasted pork now I have to have BBQ baked beans and some cornbread....lol..... boy you gents sure know how to torture a fat BBQ addicted ******* just like the chickens that dont survive the heat well I think I have the answer for that a little breading and some hot oil ... now I rate fried chicken up there with BBQ so now I am double dipped and it is not even lunch time .....YET !!!

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