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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anybody have any experience with the LC pull down from Gander Mtn? Looks like it was rebuilt by Crow Shooting Supply.

I already have a crate of ADI 92 brass to reload, but wouldn't mind adding some LC brass into the mix as well.
 

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Hmmmm. This is the first I have heard of Pull Down Brass. Had to look up what it was.
No help from me. Sorry man.
I am very curious. There must be a reason LC pulled the bullet, kept the powder, and sold the brass.

Dutch
 
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Just thought of this....
LC may have put the wrong powder in the cases...or the wrong bullet...then said (b/c of their QC) we can't use this cause we worked it already. Ahhhh, idk...I give up. Lol
I am thinking about calling someone. Yes, this might be a bit extreme. Wait, who would I call.

Dutch
 

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My experience with the Wideners still primed pull down was the observation that it was pulled down because the necks were hinky. About 5% unusable and another 5 or so percent were usable but oversize(thick).
It could have pulled down for any number of reasons. Most likely because it wasn't good enough for our troops.
 

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My experience with the Wideners still primed pull down was the observation that it was pulled down because the necks were hinky. About 5% unusable and another 5 or so percent were usable but oversize(thick).
It could have pulled down for any number of reasons. Most likely because it wasn't good enough for our troops.
I've been working with the Widener's pull downs. They were "0" fired LC cases. LC03, and LC11's. They all had primers intact with sealer, and residual sealer inside the necks. I tried xylene, acetone on the neck sealer but it was a mess, and I was worried about spoiling the primers with fumes from these solvents.

Trim length was a problem. I sorted into two piles, one with TL between 2.003 and 2.007, one with TL outside of 2.003 to 2.007. The pile with TL outside went through the power trimmer set to 2.000. The pile with the between TL were used as is. All neck mouths were chamfered.

Neck tension was a problem, since the necks had seen one bullet inserted and removed. After a vigorous scrubbing in a vibratory cleaner with walnut hull and Flitz, I ran a bore brush through the necks and used the neck tension as is without resizing. To assure things stayed together after avoiding resizing, I rolled crimped the necks into a bullet picked out with a cannelure.

No, these are not match grade, but make nice plinkers. No FTF / FTE problems because the cases are factory small on the order of fresh FGMM diameters and lengths.
 

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And with that....I take my leave of this brass. Sounds like Crow Shooting worked hard getting these to market.

Dutch
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the links bfoosh, that Gander link is what I ran across this morning. Looked like it was priced high, more just curious if anyone had used them.

That IMI is tempting as my ADI is getting low (according to my wife I have WAY too much ammo). My thinking is, if there's room to store it, you could always use more.
 

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I have posted this before, but apparently needs repeating. When LC was a government entity, surplus ammo was not a problem to them. You can't sue the government. But when ATK bought LC, their insurance company reminded them that they are a private company, and can be sued to hell and back for a lousy round, even if the barrel was full of dirt. So, no more surplus ammo. But what do they do with overruns? They pull it apart and sell it as components. Some company with a bazillion dollars worth of insurance reassembles it and sells it as 'surplus'.
 

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ATK is not in the surplus business they are in the new ammunition business. Ammunition produced for government contract must meet spec if it does but is overruns or if it doesn't but is safe to shoot it is released as XM. If it doesn't meet spec and is not save to shoot it is pulled down and sold as compents. Since much military ammo is loaded to a velocity spec it happens that pressure limits can be exceeded and necessitate large lots of ammo be pulled down. This also happens with commercial ammo, lots of pulldown bullets are sold.
 

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from Fort Campbell

About Me Advanced

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Comments about Lake City Pull Down Ammunition with Ammo Can, .308/7.62, 147-gr., FMJ:

Was checking around and testing various .308 rounds and stumbled across this one. At 3250FPS its one of the faster rounds i shot as well as the most accurate with my rifle. Absolutely LOVE IT!

Was this a gift?:No
Bottom Line Yes, I would recommend this to a friend

(2 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

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That MV seems a little high. Would this be out of a 24" bolt gun?
 

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I have posted this before, but apparently needs repeating. When LC was a government entity, surplus ammo was not a problem to them. You can't sue the government. But when ATK bought LC, their insurance company reminded them that they are a private company, and can be sued to hell and back for a lousy round, even if the barrel was full of dirt. So, no more surplus ammo. But what do they do with overruns? They pull it apart and sell it as components. Some company with a bazillion dollars worth of insurance reassembles it and sells it as 'surplus'.

Just to clarify... ATK was awarded the contract to man and operate the LC plant, they did not buy LC. LC has been operated by numerous other ammo companies over the years.
It is my understanding that they are allowed to use ( for lack of better knowledge or verbiage ) "overruns" of components. Hence the XM line using LC headstamped brass . Winchester , when they ran it was allowed to do the same thing ... this was their "USA" line.

And as for the surplus USGI ammo... I thought Clinton was the one that stopped the sale of fully assembled ammo.... it had to be broke down into components and then reassembled by the purchaser. Heck the purchaser might be the one that "disassembles" it in the same plant that "reassembles" it..... Lol.. why wouldn't that surprise me... Leave it to the Gov.
 

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That MV seems a little high. Would this be out of a 24" bolt gun?
That velocity is way out of line... remember not all internet people are as smart as us M14'ers...
 

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I have used pulled LC brass from Wideners on two occasions. The first batch of 1,000 had about 10% - 15% culls due to necks such as those shown in the picture.



The batch of 1,000 I am loading at this time had only one bad neck but did have about 5% non-LC headstamps.

I have loaded some as they came with no problems.
 

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I've been working with the Widener's pull downs. They were "0" fired LC cases. LC03, and LC11's. They all had primers intact with sealer, and residual sealer inside the necks. I tried xylene, acetone on the neck sealer but it was a mess, and I was worried about spoiling the primers with fumes from these solvents.

Trim length was a problem. I sorted into two piles, one with TL between 2.003 and 2.007, one with TL outside of 2.003 to 2.007. The pile with TL outside went through the power trimmer set to 2.000. The pile with the between TL were used as is. All neck mouths were chamfered.

Neck tension was a problem, since the necks had seen one bullet inserted and removed. After a vigorous scrubbing in a vibratory cleaner with walnut hull and Flitz, I ran a bore brush through the necks and used the neck tension as is without resizing. To assure things stayed together after avoiding resizing, I rolled crimped the necks into a bullet picked out with a cannelure.

No, these are not match grade, but make nice plinkers. No FTF / FTE problems because the cases are factory small on the order of fresh FGMM diameters and lengths.
I bought the same brass from Wideners, and had about 5-6 rejects per hundred. The rejects were obvious and easy to spot. I didn't worry about the tar in the necks, I just sized the necks and shoulders with a Forster Bump die, and never touched the inside of the necks with an expander, cotton swab, etc. After sizing, they were trimmed on my Giraud, and off to loading they went. Very nice grouping in my M1A and Rem 5-R. Good deal any very little prep, if you process them that way!
 
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