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Discussion Starter #1
Just bought a M14S Poly Tech. I've only seen pictures of it but I believe I will keep this one barring any serious problems.

This what I am thinking of buying also:

Go/no-go gauges - 7.62 Nato ---- I see them for $25 + at Brownells, are there any less expensive ones out there??

Different Bolt --- Depending on how the headspacing goes, I may replace the bolt but its going to have to be seriously out of spec before I do that. I would consider a 762MM bolt but can find no reviews of them...any thoughts???

Magazines from 44 Mag ---- 10 or 12 of them.

Flash hider with bayonet lug ---- if it can be installed on the rifle. I hope I have this right - if I have the original Castle nut, I can replace the Poly "thing" on the end of the barrel with a USGI spec one. If that's not right please let me know.

USGI Stock from Fred's --- but I have heard that the delivery time used to be pretty long from him. Is that still the case??

I would geatly appreciate answers, comments, thoughts on what I am thinking of buying..GI2

And Yes, I failed spelling in school.....
 

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Polytech/Norinco receivers are forged. They tend to be a little softer than USGI, but not enough to cause any problems. Some gunsmiths want them reheat treated if they work on them or do a rebuild. But, there are thousands out there that have never had that done, and are doing just fine.

Potential problem areas for the M14S are these. Potential because not all of them have problems, but you can expect them.
#1. Sight knobs may be soft, and won't hold zero. Fix: Replace. You can replace with USGI M14 or M1A knobs, or with USGI Garand knobs. Difference between M14/M1A knobs and Garand knobs are that M14 knobs are in meters and Garand knobs are in yards. Note also, that ALL Chinese made knobs are marked WCE. But not all WCE marked knobs are Chinese. When the Chinese reverse engineered the M14, the copied the knob markings as well. You don't want to spend the money to replace your Chinese WCE knobs with other Chinese made WCE knobs. I did use one WCE knob on mine, but it is marked in Yards(Garand) so it is okay. BM59 sight knobs will work also.
#2. Trigger and hammer may be soft. Fix: Replace with USGI M14 or commerical M1A, or with USGI Garand parts. Garand sear is shaped differently, as the M14S uses the sear designed for full auto use. But the Garand unit works just fine.
#3. Replace the op rod recoil spring. Chinese made units tend to be a bit smaller in diameter and slightly shorter in length.
#4. Stock. Stock is made from some ugly Chinese wood called "chu" wood. Only advantage is resistance to mildew. But they are soft. Fix: Replace with USGI or Commercial. However, if you do, check the connector lock pin(holds the op rod spring guide in place). USGI stocks are cut for the disconnector lever and the longer USGI pin. Many Chinese pins are shorter, and with the length difference there is a gap that allows them to work/walk out. Which can cause malfunctions. Fix: Put some form of epoxy release on the pin and the receiver and but a dab of epoxy on the inside of the stock where the pin is at. That will prevent the pin from walking out. The CMP is selling surplus USGI M14 stocks now at a decent price, and you can usually find them all over eBay. See pics below.

As for the muzzle threads. When you change the flash hider, you don't have to change any parts, but the FH itself. The muzzle threads are metric, but you will be reusing the castle nut anyway, so there is not need to change that. Reportedly, a USGI castle nut will work. threads are close enough that a USGI will thread on if done slowly, and it will act as a thread chaser and reform the threads to USGI. I haven't tried this, so I cannot comment on how well it works. Just reuse your old castle nut.

As for the bolt. Chinese guns tend to run long in headspace. They are actually set to NATO specs which is longer than commercial SAAMI specs. The bolts can be soft, but they are usually still hard enough to function properly. Their biggest problem is the lugs are miss machined to the wrong geometry. This can cause increased wear.
A bolt change is not hard, but you have to know what you are doing. HRA and Win made bolts tend to be easier to install than TRW made bolts.
Having said that, many, many people have Polys and Norincos with the original bolts and they have no problems with them.
But stick with Mil Surp ammo and you should be good to go.
Chinese barrels are good quality and also chrome lined for added life, something the M1A does not have.
 

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I agree with the last poster very well said, CMP stocks are $35 very good price for some nice wood.. I shot the heck out of my Chinese gun. I did replace the FS and rear sight..but just because I thought it was a good idea not for any reason. I'd keep the original bolt unless there is a head Space problem.. that will save you a good amount of $$.. so you can get extra mags with it or ammo.. B2B
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the excellent information...The more I've thought about it, the more I'm inclined to just buy the no-go gauge and see how it headspaces before I sink money into parts that I may not need yet. From all I've read here, there is about a zero chance that the headspace it too short.

I just ordered a stock from CMP. That is a good price.

Thanks again :ARM34:
Hank
 

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No one has mentioned this. Ammunition Lots of Ammunition
My friend has several Polys and they are all good to go all work Flawlessly
 

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I have one and the stock broke, the top clean kit hole was 1/4" high and 3/4" too long. I got a USGI walnut stock at the gun show for $25 and a USGI fiberglass from Gun parts for $45 painted it brown. I plan to shoot it alot and keep a close eye on wear.
 

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The receivers in late import guns are not soft, but the bolt may be. If your headspace is out of milspec (too long) have the bolt hardness tested by a competent machine shop that has a Rockwell tester and knows how to use it. Chances are it might be too soft. If that's the case a USGI or one of the new aftermarket bolts will be necessary. Use caution on who you allow to do the job. Unfortunately there are some butchers out there that get by on BS. Use an armorer who comes highly recommended by those in the know.

Also, the late imports (at least the Polys) came with real walnut stocks that were of very good quality. Don't ASS-U-ME that your Poly will have a "chu wood" stock. Have a good look at yours when you get it into your hands. If it's walnut it's a keeper. You might not need that USGI stock that you ordered, but there's nothing wrong with having a spare hangin' around.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I knew there was something else I needed..GI6

I reload so I plan on buying enough MilSurp to get me started with brass and go from there. I've got a couple hundred rounds of Federal AE but I've read that the brass is junk so I'm going to shoot and load it a couple times and toss it.

I'm retired now and looking forward to doing a little shooting (some bullets; some bull).

From the pictures, it looks like the nice yellow colored wood that I've seen on Chinese SKS's and AK's but if it's a light walnut that would be a big plus..
 

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If the stock has that yellow color so common to the other Chinese rifles it's chu wood. The walnut stock found on all of the Poly's of that variety that I've seen (including the one that I used to own) had a regular medium brown walnut color.
 

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my Poly is heel marked with s/n 014XX, so I'm guessing it's one of the early ones? The stock on is VERY dark brown/reddish color, with a rubber butt pad. Walnut, maybe?
 

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I have a couple of heel maked polytechs, the stocks they came with had been shortened and aa recoil pad installed. These stocks seem to be of a harder wood than the later chu wood stocks, at least hard enough that my thumb nail will not easily dent them.
 
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